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Graduate Opportunities

titles marked (MS) are for students seeking a master's degree, (PhD) are for students seeking a doctoral degree,
not marked are open to students seeking either master's or doctoral degrees
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Assistantships and Fellowships | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses

Featured Positions

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Location Title Closes Posted
University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras Large-scale Dynamics of Tropical Mountains mediated by Landsliding 1/30/17 1/16/17
Northern Arizona University Ecosystem Ecology (up to 4 positions) 1/15/17 9/26/16

All Positions

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Location Title Closes Posted
Lund University (Sweden) Herbivory & ecosystem/soil science (2 PhD positions) 7/20/17 5/23/17
Universität für Bodenkultur (Austria) Leaf ecophysiology (PhD) 7/15/17 5/31/17
Lincoln University (New Zealand) Invasive Plant Genetics (PhD) 6/24/17 6/7/17
Colorado State University Understanding Brown Treesnake Movement (PhD) 6/16/17 6/7/17
University of Rhode Island Eco-evolutionary dynamics in the plankton (PhD) 6/15/17 5/23/17
University of Bayreuth (Germany) Global Change Ecology (MS) 6/15/17 4/3/17
Boise State University Genomic adaptations enabling plants to perform photosynthesis during periods of past aridification (PhD) 6/10/17 5/12/17
University of Memphis Fungal and Microbial Ecology (PhD)  6/9/17 6/9/17
North Dakota State University Restoration of Highly Degraded Landscapes  6/7/17 6/7/17
Antioch University New England Environmental Studies 6/1/17 4/3/17
University of South Florida St. Petersburg Conservation Biology (MS) 6/1/17 3/27/17
Plymouth State University Forest Micrometeorology (MS)  5/31/17 5/31/17
Wright State University Plant–insect interactions (PhD)  5/31/17 5/31/17
North Carolina State University Forest Soil Ecology (MS)  5/31/17 5/31/17
Old Dominion University Behavioral ecology of acorn woodpeckers (PhD)  5/31/17 5/31/17
University of California Irvine Modeling microbial processes under environmental change  5/31/17 5/31/17
University of Melbourne (Australia) Biocontrol of the Vegetable Leafminer  5/31/17 5/31/17
University of New Brunswick (Canada) Marine Ecophysiology 5/31/17 5/5/17
Florida International University Plant Community Ecology (PhD) 5/31/17 5/1/17
University of Western Australia Rehabilitating landscapes by restoring digging mammals (PhD) 5/31/17 3/27/17
National University of Singapore Sustainability of SE Asian rubber plantations (PhD) 5/26/17 5/12/17
Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) Fisheries Science (MS)  5/23/17 5/23/17
Portland State University Environmental Science (3 MS positions)  5/23/17 5/23/17
University of Vermont Catchment Hydrology and Stormwater Management (PhD)  5/23/17 5/23/17
Louisiana State University Forested Wetland Ecology (PhD) 5/15/17 5/1/17
Louisiana State University Coastal Wetland Ecology (PhD) 5/15/17 5/1/17
University of Würzburg (Germany) Earth Observation and Geoanalysis of the Living Environment (MS) 5/15/17 4/3/17
Montana State University Antarctic Aquatic Ecosystems (PhD)  5/12/17 5/12/17
Washington State University Entomology - acoustic communication by psyllid pests  5/12/17 5/12/17
University of Florida Invasion risk of non-native plants (MS)  5/12/17 5/12/17
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Management of weed-seed predation (PhD) 5/10/17 5/1/17
Utah State University Solitary bee research (MS)  5/9/17 5/9/17
Ohio State University Species Interactions and Food-Web Structure in Rivers  5/9/17 5/9/17
Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi Environmental Science or Chemistry  5/5/17 5/5/17
University of Arizona Soil Carbon Storage and Soil Health (PhD) 5/5/17 3/27/17
West Virginia University Hydrology, pathogens and suspended sediment relationships (PhD)  5/1/17 5/1/17
University of Idaho Microbial Ecology (MS)  5/1/17 5/1/17
University of South Florida St. Petersburg Historical Ecology/Conservation Biology (MS)  5/1/17 5/1/17
Washington State University Vancouver Watershed Biogeochemistry and the Food-Energy-Water Nexus (PhD)  5/1/17 5/1/17
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Soil phosphorus and carbon cycling in hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities (PhD)  5/1/17 5/1/17
University of Bayreuth (Germany) Biogeographic Modelling (PhD) 5/1/17 4/5/17
University of Arkansas at Monticello Effects of genetics and stress on forest tree function and cellulose quality (MS)  4/20/17 4/20/17
University of Wisconsin-Madison Soil Microbiology (PhD) 4/15/17 4/3/17
University of North Carolina Wilmington Environmental Studies (MS) 4/15/17 4/3/17
University of Southern Mississippi Use of turtlegrass beds as habitat by nekton (PhD) 4/15/17 3/27/17
University of Florida Bats as pest controllers (MS) 4/15/17 3/27/17
South Dakota State University Soil and Hydrology Response to Disturbance (MS) 4/15/17 3/20/17
Utah State University Wetland ecosystem services and restoration 4/14/17 4/3/17
University of Florida Fungal pathogen ecology and epidemiology (PhD) 4/14/17 3/27/17
Macquarie University (Australia) Behavioural and Physiological Ecology (4 PhD positions) 4/7/17 3/27/17
West Virginia University Forest Restoration and Modelling (PhD) 4/7/17 3/20/17
University of Southern Mississippi Modeling the impact of sea-level rise on coastal wetlands (MS)  4/5/17 4/5/17
Boise State University Impacts of changes in climate, land use and biodiversity on ecosystem processes that drive the global carbon cycle (PhD)  4/3/17 4/3/17
Colorado State University Pollinator Biodiversity (PhD)  4/3/17 4/3/17
Utah State University Watershed Sciences (MS)  4/3/17 4/3/17
North Dakota State University Soils or Entomology (2 MS/PhD positions) 4/1/17 1/19/17
Guangxi University (China) Plant Ecophysiology and Evolution, Conservation Biology, and Forest Dynamics (7 positions) 3/31/17 11/23/16
University of Illinois Restoration Ecology (MS)  3/27/17 3/27/17
University of Notre Dame Genomics of ecological adaptation and speciation in insects  3/27/17 3/27/17
Colorado State University Forest Ecology (PhD)  3/27/17 3/27/17
University of Vermont Climate Statistics (PhD)  3/27/17 3/27/17
University of Alberta (Canada) Boreal Soil Carbon (PhD)  3/27/17 3/27/17
Université du Québec en Outaouais (Canada) Forest Ecology (MS) 3/25/17 1/23/17
Auburn University Evolutionary biodiversity of plant-eating insects (2 MS/PhD positions) 3/24/17 3/6/17
Colorado State University Plant Ecophysiology (PhD)  3/20/17 3/20/17
West Virginia University Nitrogen Cycling in an Appalachian Hardwood Forest (MS)  3/20/17 3/20/17
University of Georgia Coastal Wetland Landscape Ecology and Remote Sensing (2 PhD, 1 MS)  3/20/17 3/20/17
University of New Hampshire Soil Biogeochemistry/Microbial Ecology  3/20/17 3/20/17
University of South Bohemia/Czech Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Tropical Plant-Insect Food Webs (PhD) 3/20/17 2/6/17
Purdue University Mycorrhizae and evolutionary game theory  3/14/17 3/14/17
University of Montana Antarctic Aquatic Ecosystems (PhD)  3/7/17 3/7/17
Louisiana State University Soybean Entomology (MS)  3/7/17 3/7/17
University of Vermont Using climate change projections to simulate forest dynamics (PhD)  3/7/17 3/7/17
Netherlands Institute of Ecology Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolutionary biology (3 MS positions)  3/7/17 3/7/17
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Freshwater evolutionary ecology (PhD)  3/6/17 3/6/17
University of Florida Temperate and tropical canopy science (PhD)  3/6/17 3/6/17
Mississippi State University Elk and Brown Bear Habitat Relationships, Alaska (PhD)  3/6/17 3/6/17
University of Regina (Canada) Forest Ecology (MS)  3/2/17 3/2/17
University of Central Arkansas Energetics of insect-plant interactions (MS) 3/1/17 2/6/17
University of Wisconsin - Madison Mammalian Ecology (PhD) 3/1/17 1/16/17
Georgia Southern University Fish biomechanics/ecology (MS) 3/1/17 1/11/17
Georgia Southern University Plant traits and climate change (MS) 3/1/17 12/15/16
Oregon State University Vegetation Management / Ecophysiology (PhD) 3/1/17 12/12/16
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Ecology: Greener infrastructure and wetland restoration/bird diversity (2 PhD positions) 2/27/17 2/8/17
University of New Brunswick Saint John (Canada) Population and/or community ecology (PhD)  2/22/17 2/22/17
University of Bayreuth (Germany) Plant Physiological Ecology (PhD)  2/22/17 2/22/17
Mississippi State University Forest Ecophysiology (MS) 2/20/17 2/9/17
Virginia Tech Plant-stress interactions (PhD)  2/15/17 2/15/17
Murray State University Aquatic Ecology (MS) 2/15/17 1/31/17
Oklahoma State University Quail Behavioral Ecology (PhD) 2/15/17 1/31/17
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Stockholm University Ecohydrology/Biogeochemical Modelling (3 PhD postitions) 2/15/17 1/26/17
West Virginia University Environmental Microbiology (PhD) 2/15/17 1/16/17
East Carolina University Socioeconomic-ecological systems modeling (MS) 2/15/17 1/16/17
North Carolina State University Human Dimensions of the Environment 2/15/17 12/13/16
Montclair State University Soil Ecology (PhD) 2/15/17 12/13/16
West Virginia University Microbial ecology and soil carbon cycling (PhD)  2/14/17 2/14/17
Utah State University Large animal food web ecology (PhD) 2/10/17 1/26/17
Clemson University Land-atmosphere interactions in forests (PhD)  2/9/17 2/9/17
Michigan Technological University Aquatic ecology, limnology and ecotoxicology (2 MS positions)  2/9/17 2/9/17
University of Maryland Urban Forest Ecology  2/8/17 2/8/17
University of Georgia Forest Sustainability (PhD)  2/8/17 2/8/17
North Carolina State University Watershed Ecology (PhD)  2/6/17 2/6/17
University of Florida Plant diversity, landscape complexity, and trophic interactions in residential landscapes  2/6/17 2/6/17
University of Connecticut Coastal Wetland Ecology (PhD) 2/3/17 12/23/16
Old Dominion University Marine Biomechanics (PhD) 2/1/17 1/17/17
University of Connecticut Applied Forest Ecology (PhD) 2/1/17 1/11/17
Michigan State University Socioecological carbon production in managed agricultural-forest landscapes (PhD) 2/1/17 1/8/17
Michigan State University Deer Movement and Chronic Wasting Disease (PhD) 2/1/17 1/8/17
Michigan State University Chronic Wasting Disease Modeling in Deer (PhD) 2/1/17 1/8/17
Mississippi State University Forest Hydrology (MS) 2/1/17 1/7/17
University of Colorado Colorado Springs Plant-Herbivore Interactions (MS) 2/1/17 1/7/17
California Polytechnic State University Wildlife Sensory Environments (MS) 2/1/17 1/3/17
Florida International University Coastal Fish Ecology - Everglades (PhD) 2/1/17 1/3/17
Southern Illinois University Animal Physiology and Community Ecology (PhD)  1/31/17 1/31/17
University of Hong Kong Wildlife Trade (PhD) 1/31/17 1/8/17
South Dakota State University Pheasant Ecology (PhD) 1/31/17 12/13/16
Heriot-Watt University (Scotland) Energy Geoscience/Carbon Capture and Storage (2 PhD positions) 1/31/17 11/29/16
University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras Large-scale Dynamics of Tropical Mountains mediated by Landsliding 1/30/17 1/16/17
University of Maine Small mammal seed predation ecology (MS) 1/30/17 1/7/17
California State University, Bakersfield Plant Physiological Ecology (MS)  1/26/17 1/26/17
University of Northern Colorado Plant Conservation Genetics and Community Ecology  1/23/17 1/23/17
Queen's University (Canada) Ecology and genetics of adaptation and range limits in plants, California  1/23/17 1/23/17
West Virginia University Multi-species dynamics of Appalachian bird communities 1/23/17 1/10/17
Monash University Marine Evolutionary Ecology (2 PhD positions) 1/22/17 1/3/17
Boise State University Soil burial and the persistence of soil organic carbon (PhD) 1/20/17 1/3/17
University of Tübingen (Germany) Plant Ecology (PhD) 1/20/17 12/23/16
Imperial College London (UK) Quantitative and Modelling Skills in Ecology and Evolution (12 PhD positions) 1/19/17 12/12/16
University of Wyoming Plant Ecology (PhD)  1/16/17 1/16/17
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry (2 positions)  1/16/17 1/16/17
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Cumulative impacts and the resilience of coastal ecosystems (PhD)  1/16/17 1/16/17
Boise State University Human-Environment Systems  1/16/17 1/16/17
University of Florida Large Mammal Ecology and Conservation  1/16/17 1/16/17
Czech Academy of Sciences Experimental Community Ecology, Host-Parasitoid Food Webs (PhD) 1/16/17 12/13/16
SUNY-ESF Landscape Beaver Habitat Modeling (MS) 1/15/17 1/11/17
SUNY-ESF Riparian Forest Ecology and Tree-Ring Research in Arid-land River Basins (PhD) 1/15/17 1/11/17
Ohio State University Predator-Prey Aquatic Ecology 1/15/17 1/3/17
Iowa State University Ecosystem Ecology and Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling (PhD) 1/15/17 1/3/17
Boise State University Sensory stimuli and wildlife (PhD) 1/15/17 1/3/17
Universitat de Valencia (Spain) Biotic interactions shaping plant communities (PhD) 1/15/17 1/3/17
Tulane University Tropical Rainforest Evolutionary Ecology (PhD) 1/15/17 12/23/16
Northern Arizona University Coupled Natural-Human Systems (MS) 1/15/17 12/23/16
University of Connecticut Phylogenomics, host-symbiont diversification (PhD) 1/15/17 12/13/16
University of Nevada, Reno Climate-Land Use-Species Distribution Nexus (PhD) 1/15/17 12/13/16
University of Konstanz (Germany) Root traits and plant functional diversity (PhD) 1/15/17 12/13/16
University of Florida Bayesian models applied to ecology (PhD) 1/15/17 12/12/16
University of Rhode Island Spatial ecology and habitat use of American Woodcock 1/15/17 12/8/16
University of Alaska Fairbanks Shrub effects on C and N cycling in arctic tundra (2 positions) 1/15/17 12/8/16
University of Wuerzburg (Germany) Bee-Plant-Microbe Interactions (2 PhD positions) 1/15/17 12/8/16
University of Oklahoma Fish Biodiversity 1/15/17 11/29/16
University of Mississippi Synthetic Ecology and the Evolution of Symbiosis 1/15/17 11/21/16
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology (Germany) Bird Evolution (2 PhD positions) 1/15/17 11/17/16
University of Wyoming Plant-Insect Interactions (PhD) 1/15/17 11/8/16
University of Toronto (Canada) Remote sensing and forest ecology (PhD) 1/15/17 10/11/16
Virginia Commonwealth University Coastal Plant Ecology (MS) 1/15/17 9/26/16
Northern Arizona University Ecosystem Ecology (up to 4 positions) 1/15/17 9/26/16
Tulane University Plant-Microbe Interactions (PhD) 1/15/17 9/21/16
University of Wyoming Landscape Genomics (PhD) 1/13/17 1/7/17
University of Southern Mississippi Microbial Ecology (PhD)  1/11/17 1/11/17
Virginia Commonwealth University Ecology 1/10/17 10/12/16
University of Konstanz (Germany) Responses to biotic and abiotic changes, Resilience and Reversibility of lake ecosystems (15 PhD positions) 1/9/17 12/12/16
University of Mississippi Aquatic Ecology  1/8/17 1/8/17
University of Texas at El Paso Arctic Ecosystem/Community Ecology (PhD)  1/8/17 1/8/17
University of Connecticut Stream Carbon Dynamics (PhD)  1/8/17 1/8/17
University of Helsinki (Finland) Plant Ecophysiology (PhD) 1/7/17 12/14/16
Ohio State University Ecological Restoration 1/7/17 12/13/16
University of Arkansas Environmental Flows (2 PhD positions) 1/6/17 12/24/16
University of Washington Predator-Prey Dynamics (PhD) 1/6/17 12/12/16
Bangor University (UK) Tropical Forest Ecology (PhD) 1/6/17 11/6/16
Montana State University Plant Ecophysiology (MS)  1/5/17 1/5/17
University of Alaska Fairbanks Insect Ecology (MS)  1/3/17 1/3/17
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Hawaiian Drosophila Behavioral Genomics (PhD)  1/3/17 1/3/17
Virginia Tech Metacommunities in River Networks (PhD)  1/3/17 1/3/17
University of Utah Physiological Ecology of Western US Mountain Forests (PhD) 1/3/17 11/6/16
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Biodiversity Research (8 PhD positions) 1/1/17 12/12/16
Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald (Germany) Experimental Plant Ecology (PhD) 1/1/17 12/12/16
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Microbial Community Ecology (PhD) 1/1/17 11/29/16
University of Texas at El Paso Population & Evolutionary Genetics (PhD) 1/1/17 11/15/16
University of British Columbia (Canada) Plant Ecology (PhD) 1/1/17 10/12/16
University of Kentucky Quantitative Evolution & Ecology (PhD) 1/1/17 8/23/16
University of Washington Seattle Interactions Among Carnivores and Ungulates (2 PhD positions) 12/31/16 12/19/16
University of Hawaii at Manoa Modeling Zero-Deforestation Commitments in South America 12/31/16 12/14/16
Rice University Coral Reef Virology 12/31/16 11/15/16
Utah State University Restoration/rangeland ecology 12/31/16 11/8/16
Virginia Commonwealth University Insect behavior and insect parasitoid multi-trophic interactions (MS) 12/31/16 9/23/16
Syracuse University Functional ecology of grasslands 12/31/16 9/13/16
Louisiana State University Mississippi River sediment transport, channel morphology, and deltaic development (PhD)  12/24/16 12/24/16
University of Akron Effects of Pollination Biology on the Evolution of Plant Mating Systems (PhD)  12/23/16 12/23/16
Boston University Urban Biogeochemical Research (PhD)  12/23/16 12/23/16
Texas Tech University Plant Ecological Genetics (PhD)  12/23/16 12/23/16
Ohio State University Food webs, biodiversity, and landscape change in river-riparian ecosystems 12/23/16 12/12/16
University College Dublin Analysis of Biological Records (PhD) 12/21/16 11/29/16
Utah State University Watershed Sciences (PhD)  12/19/16 12/19/16
University of California Riverside Nitrogen Cycling in High Temperature Agroecosystems (PhD) 12/19/16 11/15/16
South Dakota State University Pesticides in northern Great Plains grasslands - distribution and environmental impact 12/16/16 11/17/16
Georgia Institute of Technology Community Ecology 12/16/16 11/15/16
University of South Dakota Sustainability - Ecosystem Services & Visioning 12/16/16 11/14/16
Texas A&M University Social insect molecular ecology and phylogenomics (2 PhD positions)  12/15/16 12/15/16
University of Montana, University of Idaho, University of Wyoming, and Kansas State University Causes and consequences of wildfire in subalpine forests (2 MS, 2 PhD positions)  12/15/16 12/15/16
University of Idaho Natural Resources (several positions)  12/15/16 12/15/16
Northeastern University Impacts of Past & Future Global Change on Marine Calcifiers (PhD) 12/15/16 11/29/16
Montana State University Interactions among food, water, and energy systems (5 PhD, 1 MS position) 12/15/16 11/17/16
Purdue University Fish and Aquatic Ecology 12/15/16 11/14/16
University of British Columbia Plant-Insect Interactions 12/15/16 11/10/16
Oregon State University Forest Ecophysiology (PhD) 12/15/16 11/6/16
University of Alaska Anchorage Physiological Ecology (MS) 12/15/16 11/1/16
University of California, Davis Agro-ecology and/or Conservation Science (PhD) 12/15/16 10/11/16
Utah State University Plant Ecology 12/15/16 10/4/16
East Carolina University Rock pool food webs  12/14/16 12/14/16
University of Illinois Plant Traits and Biogeochemical Cycling (PhD)  12/13/16 12/13/16
University of Alabama, University of Georgia, University of Connecticut, Virginia Tech, and Coastal Carolina University Temperature effects on stream network carbon processing (5 positions)  12/13/16 12/13/16
North Dakota State University Blackbird Eco-physiology  12/13/16 12/13/16
Auburn University Evolutionary Physiology (2 PhD positions)  12/13/16 12/13/16
University of Southern Mississippi Coastal Sciences  12/13/16 12/13/16
University of Montana Food-Energy-Water Nexus  12/13/16 12/13/16
Western Washington University Benthic community structure and sediment geochemistry (MS)  12/13/16 12/13/16
Boston University Forecasting Ticks, Small Mammals, Phenology, Carbon Cycle (3-4 PhD positions)  12/13/16 12/13/16
North Carolina State University Coastal Wetland Biogeochemistry (PhD)  12/12/16 12/12/16
University of Florida Geospatial analysis and spatial ecology, sustainable/resilient land use (PhD)  12/12/16 12/12/16
South Dakota State University Invasive Tree Distribution and Ecological Impact (PhD) 12/9/16 11/16/16
University of Florida Ambrosia beetles and their symbiotic fungi (PhD) 12/9/16 11/9/16
Boston University Ecosystem Ecology & Biogeochemistry (PhD) 12/7/16 11/9/16
Humboldt State University Dendroecology (2-3 MS positions)  12/6/16 12/6/16
University of California Riverside Ecological Genomics (PhD) 12/4/16 11/29/16
Ohio State University Species Traits and Food-Web Structure (PhD) 12/1/16 11/15/16
Purdue University Plant-Insect Chemical Ecology 12/1/16 11/14/16
University of Georgia Savanna Tree Dynamics, Tanzania 12/1/16 11/10/16
University of California Riverside Quantitative population and community ecology (PhD) 12/1/16 11/9/16
University of Texas at El Paso Wetland Ecology and Education (PhD) 12/1/16 11/8/16
Utah State University Field Insect Ecology and Public Outreach 12/1/16 11/6/16
Ohio State University Aquatic Biogeochemistry 12/1/16 11/6/16
George Washington University Plant/microbe ecology/evolution (PhD) 12/1/16 10/28/16
University of Notre Dame Ecosystem Consequences of Evolutionary Change (PhD) 12/1/16 10/28/16
Utah State University Landscape Ecology of Beneficial Insects 12/1/16 10/27/16
Michigan Technological University Ecology and management of hardwood forests affected by beech bark disease (PhD) 12/1/16 10/27/16
Purdue University Forest structure and carbon cycling (PhD) 12/1/16 10/22/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Influence of Climate Change on the Health of Breeding Shorebirds (MS) 12/1/16 10/22/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Ecotoxicology, migratory shorebirds (MS) 12/1/16 10/22/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Importance of wetlands for offsetting adverse effects of agricultural intensification to birds (PhD) 12/1/16 10/22/16
University of Georgia Freshwater Conservation and Management (MS) 12/1/16 10/13/16
Stony Brook University/Brookhaven National Laboratory Tropical Plant Ecophysiology (PhD) 12/1/16 10/13/16
Texas Tech University Landscape Ecology 12/1/16 10/12/16
Northwestern University/Chicago Botanic Garden Plant Biology & Conservation 12/1/16 10/11/16
Utah State University Plant-Insect Interactions and Insect Pathology (MS) 12/1/16 10/11/16
University of California Berkeley Tropical Forests and Global Change (2 PhD positions) 12/1/16 10/5/16
University of Texas at Austin Plant Ecology (PhD) 12/1/16 10/5/16
Baylor University Avian Macroecology (PhD) 12/1/16 9/28/16
University of Oregon Ecology and Evolution (PhD) 12/1/16 9/28/16
University of Kansas Aquatic Microbial Biogeochemistry 12/1/16 9/14/16
Dartmouth College Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems, and Society (PhD) 12/1/16 9/13/16
University of California Riverside Plant community ecology (2 PhD positions) 12/1/16 7/25/16
Binghamton University Species interactions and invasion ecology 11/30/16 11/6/16
Portland State University Landscape genetics, plant dispersal  11/29/16 11/29/16
Ohio State University Aquatic Physiological Ecology 11/25/16 11/8/16
University of Tokyo (Japan) Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics and Evolutionary Ecology 11/25/16 10/28/16
Florida International University Restoration Ecology (PhD)  11/21/16 11/21/16
Kansas State University Microbial Interactions  11/21/16 11/21/16
New Mexico State University Plant Invasion Ecology and Soil Microbial Ecology (PhD) 11/20/16 9/23/16
University of Florida Wildlife spatial ecology and conservation (MS) 11/18/16 10/27/16
University of California Riverside Community Ecology (2 PhD positions) 11/17/16 9/13/16
University of South Dakota Avian Biodiversity (PhD)  11/16/16 11/16/16
Trent University (Canada) Ecology of Lake and River Ecosystems  11/15/16 11/15/16
Pennsylvania State University Fuels, Fire Effects, and Fire Ecology in Mid-Atlantic Forests  11/15/16 11/15/16
University of Florida Fire Ecology (PhD)  11/15/16 11/15/16
University of Florida/IFAS Soil microbial ecology (PhD)  11/15/16 11/15/16
University of Hong Kong Climate Change Ecology – Hong Kong and South Africa 11/15/16 11/6/16
Memorial University of Newfoundland Mathematical biology 11/15/16 10/27/16
Central Michigan University Fish Behavioral Ecology (1 MS, 1 PhD position) 11/15/16 10/26/16
University of Geneva Limnology (PhD) 11/15/16 10/13/16
Purdue University Forest Entomology 11/15/16 10/11/16
Utah State University Ecological/Evolutionary Modelling and Plant Ecology (2 PhD positions) 11/15/16 9/14/16
Clemson University Plant and Environmental Sciences (2 PhD positions) 11/15/16 7/11/16
University of Louisville Plant chemical and molecular ecology (2 PhD positions) 12/1/16 11/16/16
Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi Quantitative community and spatial ecology (PhD)  11/10/16 11/10/16
University of Montana Modeling predator-prey dynamics (PhD)  11/10/16 11/10/16
University of Maine Intertidal Food-Web Ecology 11/10/16 10/28/16
University of Idaho Fire Ecology  11/8/16 11/8/16
University of Rhode Island Plant-Insect Ecology  11/8/16 11/8/16
Washington State University, Vancouver Evolutionary ecology of plant-microbe symbiosis  11/8/16 11/8/16
Southern Illinois University Animal Physiological Ecology (PhD)  11/8/16 11/8/16
University of Alaska Fairbanks Vertebrate Physiological Ecology  11/8/16 11/8/16
University of New Mexico Forest and disturbance ecology (PhD) 11/7/16 10/11/16
Virginia Tech Invasive Plant Ecology (PhD)  11/6/16 11/6/16
North Carolina State University Plant Conservation Biology (MS)  11/6/16 11/6/16
North Carolina State University Microbial ecology of caviar and fish eggs  11/6/16 11/6/16
Oregon State University Plant hydraulic traits and soil moisture dynamics (PhD)  11/6/16 11/6/16
University of New Hampshire Emerald ash borer parasitoid ecology  11/6/16 11/6/16
Murray State University Ecology of Xerohydric Flatwoods in KY (MS) 11/4/16 9/27/16
Auburn University Plant-eating insect evolution 11/1/16 10/13/16
University of Hawaii at Manoa Ecological-Economic Modeling (PhD) 11/1/16 10/12/16
Michigan State University Human Dimensions of Natural Resources 11/1/16 10/10/16
University of Central Florida Evolution, Systematics and Biogeography of Squamates (PhD) 11/1/16 9/28/16
University of Texas Marine Science Institute Marine Community Ecology 11/1/16 9/26/16
University of Montana Ecology & Conservation, Wildlife (2 PhD positions) 11/1/16 9/26/16
University of Alabama Bumble bee population genomics across spatial and environmental gradients 11/1/16 9/26/16
University of Alabama Community and Ecosystem Ecology (2 PhD positions) 11/1/16 9/26/16
University of Connecticut Applied Forest Ecology (PhD) 11/1/16 9/23/16
Michigan State University Plant-insect ecology 11/1/16 9/22/16
University of Connecticut Wetland Ecology (MS) 11/1/16 9/20/16
Michigan State University Chronic Wasting Disease (PhD) 11/1/16 9/14/16
Auburn University Aquatic ecology/limnology 11/1/16 9/13/16
Oregon State University Forest Disturbance and Recovery Dynamics (PhD) 11/1/16 8/30/16
Clemson University Ecology (2 PhD positions) 10/30/16 9/29/16
University of Massachusetts—Amherst Organic Matter Mineralization and Metal Cycling During Flood Plain Evolution (PhD)  10/28/16 10/28/16
University of Central Florida Aquatic Biogeochemistry (1 MS, 1 PhD position)  10/28/16 10/28/16
West Virginia University Forest Biogeochemistry  10/28/16 10/28/16
University of Georgia Gopher Tortoise Conservation 10/28/16 9/20/16
Texas A&M University Wetland Avian Ecophysiology (PhD)  10/27/16 10/27/16
University of Nevada, Reno Mountain Ecohydrology (PhD)  10/27/16 10/27/16
University of Nevada, Reno Evolutionary Endocrinology and Urban Physiology  10/27/16 10/27/16
California State University, Northridge Community Ecology and Evolution (MS)  10/27/16 10/27/16
University of Florida Community Ecology 10/24/16 10/11/16
Oregon State University Spatial/temporal patterns of ungulate grazing ecology (PhD)  10/22/16 10/22/16
University of Alberta (Canada) Plant-Water Relations (PhD)  10/22/16 10/22/16
Technische Universität München (Germany) Rhizosphere as driver of subsoil organic matter dynamics (PhD) 10/20/16 9/28/16
Iowa State University Bird and pollinator use of prairie reconstructions on commercial farms (PhD) 10/20/16 9/26/16
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Ecology of crop protection against insect pests in agriculture (PhD) 10/20/16 9/26/16
University of Connecticut Human dimensions; black bear management strategies (MS) 10/20/16 9/20/16
Southern Cross University (Australia) Seagrass denitrification (PhD) 10/15/16 9/29/16
University of Southern Mississippi Aquatic Insect Ecology (2 positions) 10/15/16 9/14/16
University of Oklahoma Coupled Natural-Human Systems (MS) 10/15/16 9/23/16
Purdue University Plant plasticity and evolutionary game theory 10/15/16 9/2/16
Ohio State University Molecular Basis for Coevolution between Venomous Snakes and their Prey (PhD) 10/15/16 8/30/16
University of Vermont Soils/watershed biogeochemistry  10/14/16 10/14/16
Washington State University Sustainability Modeling at the Food-Energy-Water Nexus  10/13/16 10/13/16
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Ecological genomics of trees (PhD)  10/13/16 10/13/16
Utah State University Watershed Sciences (MS)  10/13/16 10/13/16
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Lake and Terrestrial Paleoecology (2 PhD positions)  10/13/16 10/13/16
University of Maryland Forest Ecology (PhD)  10/13/16 10/13/16
Bethune-Cookman University Coastal Resilience (MS)  10/13/16 10/13/16
University of Illinois at Chicago Ecological-evolutionary processes in soil food webs (PhD)  10/13/16 10/13/16
Mississippi State University Coastal wetlands in Puerto Rico (2 MS, 1 PhD position)  10/13/16 10/13/16
Georgetown University Ecology, evolution and behavior (7 positions)  10/13/16 10/13/16
University of Northern British Columbia (Canada) Forest-climate interactions (2 MS positions)  10/13/16 10/13/16
Ohio University Plant ecology and climate change impacts  10/12/16 10/12/16
Purdue University Pollinator conservation  10/12/16 10/12/16
University of South Dakota Impacts of bioenergy economy for the Upper Missouri River Basin (3 PhD positions)  10/12/16 10/12/16
Purdue University Applied Ecology of Urban Landscapes  10/11/16 10/11/16
Temple University Deep-Sea Community Ecology (PhD)  10/11/16 10/11/16
Bar-Ilan University (Israel) Animal Social Networks (2 positions)  10/11/16 10/11/16
University of California Irvine Microbes in a Changing Environment (3 positions)  10/11/16 10/11/16
Virginia Tech Soil ecology and biogeochemistry  10/11/16 10/11/16
Lincoln University (New Zealand) Freshwater plant invasions (PhD) 10/10/16 9/13/16
University of Missouri Movement ecology of white-fronted geese in Europe and North America (MS) 10/7/16 9/14/16
Clemson University Impact of emerging infectious disease on animal community dynamics (PhD) 10/5/16 9/14/16
University of Canterbury (New Zealand) Plant Ecophysiology and Molecular Biology (PhD) 10/3/16 9/6/16
Auburn University Ecological drivers of mosquito-borne diseases (MS) 10/1/16 9/21/16
University of Maryland Urban Forest Ecology, Data Synthesis 10/1/16 9/20/16
University of Illinois Desert mammals & shrub encroachment (PhD) 10/1/16 8/30/16
Georgia Southern University Fish Ecology (MS) 9/30/16 9/20/16
James Cook University (Australia) Ecology of feral cats and chital deer in Australian wet tropics (2 PhD positions) 9/30/16 9/14/16
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Blue carbon under changing environmental conditions (PhD) 9/30/16 9/6/16
University of Rhode Island Ecology and evolution in marine phytoplankton (2 PhD positions) 9/30/16 8/23/16
University of Southern Mississippi Models of carbon dynamics/impact of sea level rise in coastal wetlands (MS)  9/28/16 9/28/16
University of North Dakota Earth System Science and Policy  9/28/16 9/28/16
University of Kansas Biogeochemical puzzles in terrestrial ecosystem ecology (PhD)  9/27/16 9/27/16
University of Southern Mississippi Evolutionary ecology  9/26/16 9/26/16
Utah State University Plant-soil interactions and soil biogeochemistry  9/26/16 9/26/16
Stephen F. Austin State University Biology or Biotechnology (MS)  9/23/16 9/23/16
University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (Canada) Forest Ecology (MS)  9/23/16 9/23/16
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Interactions between food production and global environmental change (PhD)  9/23/16 9/23/16
University of Arkansas Conservation biogeography of regional endemic dragonflies (MS)  9/23/16 9/23/16
University of Georgia Integrative Conservation (PhD)  9/21/16 9/21/16
Baylor University Microbial Ecology (PhD)  9/21/16 9/21/16
Iowa State University Entomology (PhD)  9/20/16 9/20/16
John Carroll University Terrestrial Ecology, Amphibians (MS)  9/15/16 9/15/16
Pennsylvania State University Stress Physiology/Susceptibility of Elk to Chronic Wasting Disease (MS) 9/15/16 8/30/16
Purdue University Effects of Fire on Residual Timber Quality 9/15/16 8/15/16
Texas Tech University Small Mammal Ecology (MS)  9/14/16 9/14/16
Texas Tech University Wetland Ecology (PhD)  9/14/16 9/14/16
Wilfrid Laurier University (Canada) Biological responses to environmental stressors in lakes (2 MS positions)  9/14/16 9/14/16
Humboldt State University Fisheries Biology (2 MS positions)  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Idaho Forest regeneration (MS)  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Washington Forest/Disturbance/Landscape Ecology  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Maryland Urban Ecosystems  9/14/16 9/14/16
Iowa State University Soil carbon cycling (PhD)  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Connecticut Plant-arthropod interactions and global change  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Maine Arthropod-Borne Disease Ecology (MS)  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Arkansas at Monticello Use of prescribed burning to restore and maintain forest health (MS)  9/14/16 9/14/16
University of Florida Geospatial Analysis/Sustainable and Resilient Land Use (PhD)  9/13/16 9/13/16
Florida State University Ecological, behavioral genetics and genomics  9/13/16 9/13/16
Virginia Commonwealth University Physiological ecology, insect-plant interactions (PhD)  9/13/16 9/13/16
Northern Illinois University Ecosystem Restoration & Functional/Community Ecology (PhD) 9/9/16 8/23/16
University of Utah Global change ecology (PhD)  9/7/16 9/7/16
University of Maine Ecology and Evolution of Diseases (PhD) 9/4/16 8/30/16
Oklahoma State University Urban Ecology of Ticks, Tick-borne Diseases, and Bird & Mammal Hosts (MS) 9/2/16 7/25/16
University of Illinois Pocket gopher ecology & genetics (PhD) 9/1/16 8/2/16
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Social-Ecological Systems (MS) 9/1/16 6/2/16
University of Georgia Physiological ecology of trees and forest ecosystem processes (PhD)  8/31/16 8/31/16
North Dakota State University Evolutionary and ecological plant conservation genetics (MS)  8/30/16 8/30/16
University of Idaho Modeling Forest Disturbances (PhD)  8/30/16 8/30/16
Wesleyan University Effects of forest fragmentation on tri-trophic interactions (PhD)  8/30/16 8/30/16
South Dakota State University Arctic Systems Ecology (2 MS positions)  8/30/16 8/30/16
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Community and/or ecosystem ecology (2 positions)  8/30/16 8/30/16
Michigan State University Fire Ecology (PhD)  8/30/16 8/30/16
Virginia Tech Stream Ecology & Biogeochemistry  8/23/16 8/23/16
Ohio State University Urban Soil Ecology (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of Central Florida Plant Evolutionary Ecophysiology (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
Cornell University Host-Microbe Interactions (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of New Hampshire Population Ecology of Arctic Rodents (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Agroecosystem Micromet Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Fluxes  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Ecological Genomics of Trees (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
Temple University Biodiversity Science (PhD)  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of Groningen (The Netherlands) Evolutionary Life Sciences (12 PhD positions)  8/23/16 8/23/16
University of Wyoming Animal-plant interactions, Kenya (PhD) 8/20/16 7/29/16
University of Auckland (New Zealand) Drought-induced forest mortality (PhD) 8/19/16 7/22/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Root traits and root-soil interactions in contrasting crop genotypes (1 MS, 1 PhD)  8/15/16 8/15/16
International Max Planck Research School Exploration of Ecological Interactions with Molecular and Chemical Techniques (4 PhD positions) 8/19/16 7/11/16
University of South Bohemia/Czech Academy of Sciences Community Ecology, host-parasitoid food webs (PhD) 8/8/16 7/18/16
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Biodiversity Synthesis (PhD) 8/1/16 7/12/16
Central Michigan University Spatial Ecology and Reproductive Ecology of Native Freshwater Mussels (2 MS positions) 7/22/16 7/7/16
South Dakota State University Environmental impacts of neonicotinoids in grasslands (PhD)  7/18/16 7/18/16
University of Arkansas Monarch butterfly habitat modeling (PhD)  7/18/16 7/18/16
University of Arkansas Hydropedological modeling (MS)  7/18/16 7/18/16
West Virginia University Black Duck Wintering Ecology  7/18/16 7/18/16
Oregon State University Cattle grazing systems and recovery of riparian ecosystems (PhD)  7/18/16 7/18/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Toxicology, vegetation management of Rights-of-Way (MS)  7/12/16 7/12/16
North Dakota State University Distribution and abundance of pollinators (PhD)  7/12/16 7/12/16
York University (Canada) Plant-animal interactions in the deserts of California  6/23/16 6/23/16
University of Saskatchewan (Canada) Energetics of Life History Variation in a Hibernating Mammal (PhD)  6/22/16 6/22/16

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Top | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses

Assistantship and Fellowships:

Antioch University New England: We are offering Graduate Student Assistantships through centers and research programs in the Environmental Studies Department. These assistantships place the student at the intersection of scholarship and practice as they develop their professional skills as part of our Master’s or PhD programs in Environmental Studies. Assistantships are currently available in: - Forest Ecology and Management - Wildlife Ecology: turtle conservation - Applications in GIS - Climate Change Preparedness - Environmental Education - Food Justice and Community Gardening - US Progressive Caucus Fellowship - Social Justice: Livable Wage Initiative. Students interested are encouraged to apply as part of their application for admission to the Master’s Degree in Environmental Studies. We encourage prospective students to contact us if they have any questions about the assistantships or the degree programs. Application materials will be accepted until June 1, 2017. For admission info, contact, Sarah Wilson, swilson@antioch.edu For assistantship info contact, Professor Peter A. Palmiotto, ppalmiotto@antioch.edu. Posted: 4/3/17.

Auburn University: Nate Hardy is looking for two graduate students (either PhD or MS) to join his research group to work on the evolutionary biodiversity of sap-sucking bugs. He needs help with two projects: 1) Estimating the aphid phylogeny and using it to figure out what drives speciation in plant-eating insects. 2) Conducting selection experiments and gene expression analyses to figure out how plant-eating insects evolve their diets. Please see the Hardy Lab website for a more detailed overview of the research program. Students with an interest in any of the following subjects are encouraged to apply: speciation, species diversity, phylogenomics, comparative phylogenetics, evolutionary ecology, experimental evolution, and transcriptomics. Four years of support are available for PhD students and two years for MS students, through graduate research fellowships that include a tuition waiver, health benefits and a competitive stipend. The start date for both positions is August 18, the beginning of the 2017 Fall Semester. If you are interested, please send a CV and a short statement of your research interests (less than 500 words) to Nate Hardy, n8@auburn.edu. Feel free to contact him by email for further information. Please also apply to the Auburn Graduate School. Review will start on March 24. Dr Nate B Hardy, Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849, n8@auburn.edu. Posted: 3/6/17.

Auburn University: The Hood lab is looking to recruit 2 grad students (Ph.D. preferred) for fall 2017 to work on an NSF-funded project to evaluate the role that mitochondria play in variation in the reproductive fitness and longevity of animals. Students may work on our wild-derived house mouse model or alternate species. Interested applicants should review our webpage, linked above, and send an email to Dr. Wendy Hood at wrhood@auburn.edu. In the email, please include a description of prior research experience, your training in evolutionary biology, physiology, and cell biology. If available, please also include an unofficial copy of your undergraduate and graduate institution transcripts (if post-masters), GPA and GRE scores, an example of your scientific writing, and the email address for 1-2 references. Please contact Dr. Hood ASAP if you would like to be considered for invitation to our graduate student recruitment day in January. You can learn more about Biological Sciences at Auburn and our grad program page. Posted: 12/13/16.

Auburn University: Nate Hardy is looking for two graduate students (either PhD or MS) to join his research group and work on the evolutionary biodiversity of sap-sucking bugs. He needs help with two projects: 1) Estimating the North American aphid phylogeny and using it to figure out what drives speciation in plant-eating insects. 2) Conducting selection experiments and comparative genomic analyses to figure out how plant-eating insects evolve new diets. Students with an interest in phylogenomics, comparative phylogenetics, evolutionary ecology, experimental evolution, epigenetics, and transcriptomics are encouraged to apply. A background in any of these areas would be great, but is not required. Four years of support are available for PhD students and two years for MS students, through graduate research fellowships that include a tuition waiver, health benefits and a competitive stipend. There are two possible start dates: January 11, which is the beginning of the 2017 Spring Semester, and August 18, the start of the 2017 Fall Semester. If you are interested, please send a CV and a short statement of your research interests (less than 500 words) to Nate Hardy, n8@auburn.edu. Feel free to contact him by email for further information. Review will start in the first week of November 2016. Posted: 10/13/16.

Auburn University: The Disease Ecology lab is looking to fill a MSc position with an enthusiastic student interested in disease ecology and medical entomology. This student will conduct research on the ecological drivers of mosquito-borne diseases. Understanding and predicting the impact of land-use change on mosquito ecology is critical for the development of vector control and management efforts. As part of an on-going project, the selected student will play an integral role in a project assessing the role of land-use change on vector distribution and host-feeding preferences in mosquitoes along the Gulf Coast. Qualifications: Applicants must have completed a BSc degree by start date and have a strong interest in medical/veterinary entomology. Student must be a team player willing to work under harsh field conditions (rain or shine, sometimes in extreme heat), have exceptional writing and quantitative skills, and some field and/or laboratory experience. Start date: Jan 2017, although research can begin as early as Nov 2016. To Apply: Please send a letter describing your background and interest in the topic, CV, and names of three references to zohdy@auburn.edu. Review of applications will begin Oct 1. Posted: 9/21/16.

Auburn University: Two graduate research assistantships (Ph.D. or M.S.) in aquatic ecology/limnology are available in Alan Wilson’s lab. Current lab research projects take advantage of our large field station that includes hundreds of ponds and nearby reservoirs where we answer basic and applied questions associated with understanding the ecological, evolutionary, and limnological mechanisms controlling the structure and function of freshwater plankton communities with an emphasis on harmful algal blooms. My students are welcome to participate on existing projects but are strongly encouraged to develop their own projects in addition to applying for external grants and fellowships. Ideal candidates will be hard-working, honest, motivated, team-oriented, and excited about studying freshwater communities using lab and field-based approaches. Prior coursework in ecology and statistics, a strong interest in mentoring undergraduates and participating in outreach, and relevant research experiences (including analytical skills, such GC-MS, HPLC, ELISA) are desirable. Interested students are encouraged to email Alan Wilson (wilson@auburn.edu) describing why the lab is a good fit for you by 1 November 2016 for full consideration. In addition, please include your resume, GRE scores, copies of transcripts, and contact information for three references. Posted: 9/13/16.

Bangor University: PhD studentship in Tropical Forest Ecology. A call is now open for excellent UK and EU students to apply for an ENVISION studentship and to join our exciting new Panama-based project: ‘Assessing the role of fungus-mediated plant-soil feedbacks during secondary succession of tropical forests’. More information? Apply now? Check it out: · ENVISION · FindAPhD. Application deadline: 6 January 2017. If there are questions, please email Dr Lars Markesteijn: (l.markesteijn@bangor.ac.uk). Posted: 11/6/16.

Bar-Ilan University: Two MSc/PhD positions are available at a new lab in Bar-Ilan University, Israel: 1. Studying the effect of fear on social networks in a wild rock hyrax population. The goal of this project is to learn how social networks change in response to perceived elevation in predation risk. We will use a range of methods to simulate high predation risk, and will record the effect on the social network using proximity sensors. Requirements: - Behavioral ecology background. - Experience in fieldwork, preferably with mammals in warm climate. - Willingness to spend 5 months every year in a field station in Ein Gedi Nature Reserve, Israel. - Excellent data analysis skills, preferably using R. 2. Fitness consequences of social network dynamics. This is a theoretical project that is aimed at extending previous work (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms12084) on the fundamental structure of social networks. We will simulate social network dynamics to identify how several factors such as environmental effects and individual traits affect social structure; and how in turn the social structure contributes to variation in survival and reproductive success. Requirements: - Background in computational biology. - Proficiency in at least one programming language. The start date of both positions is flexible. Applicants should send the following to Dr. Amiyaal Ilany at amiyaal@gmail.com : - Cover letter - CV - Names and email addresses of 2 references Please note the position you are applying to. Posted: 10/11/16.

Baylor University: Avian Macroecology. PhD students are sought to study the influences of habitat connectivity, landscape phenology, climate, or land-cover transitions on North American bird populations and communities. Possible directions of research include but are not limited to interaction or cumulative effects of broad-scale ecological conditions and human dimensions (e.g., social, economic, cultural, or demographic factors). Students will have considerable latitude and assistance with developing the direction of their work. National and regional databases will be available for analysis and will enable unique perspectives and new syntheses regarding the macroecological drivers of avian population and community dynamics. The overarching goals of this work are to improve understanding of the broad-scale ecological and human factors that drive short and long-term flux in bird populations and communities, and to use this knowledge to inform avian conservation policy, planning, and implementation. Applications are invited for positions that will start in the fall of 2017 in the Department of Biology at Baylor in Waco, Texas. Qualifications: Applicants must have a Master of Science degree in a relevant field. Training and experience with GIS and statistical methods, through prior coursework or research activities, are essential. Students should have a strong interest in developing additional expertise in GIS and quantitative methods. Preference will be given to those who have published quantitative ecological research, who have presented research at scientific meetings, and who have some experience working with large databases. Competitive applicants will have undergraduate and graduate GPAs of 3.5 or higher, verbal and quantitative GRE scores at or above the 70th percentile, and a GRE analytical writing score of 5.0 or greater. Students with some but not all of these credentials will be considered and are encouraged to submit an application. Compensation: For up to 5 years, and depending on qualifications, each position will include teaching-assistantship funding ($22-30k/12 months), tuition remission (up to 20 credits/12 months), health insurance benefits (80% of cost of premium covered), and funding for travel to professional meetings. Support for a research assistantship may replace some of the TA funding during the course of the student’s program. To apply, create a single pdf that includes: a letter of interest that describes your career goals and that explicitly addresses the position requirements; a resume; unofficial undergraduate and graduate transcripts; unofficial general GRE scores (no more than 5 years old by mid-February 2017) including percentile information; and a list of three references and their institution, email address, and phone number. Before submitting an application, carefully consider the requirements for a PhD degree by examining the Department of Biology Graduate Student Handbook. Email your pdf to Professor Kevin Gutzwiller (kevin_gutzwiller@baylor.edu), and contact him with questions about the positions. The deadline for applications is 1 December 2016. After a review of applications, Professor Gutzwiller will invite the most qualified applicants to apply formally to the Ph.D. Program in Biology. An all-expenses paid campus visit will be offered to the applicants in the departmental pool that are the most qualified. Final decisions about admission and an offer of an assistantship will be made by the Baylor Graduate School and the Biology Graduate Committee. Posted: 9/28/16.

Baylor University: The Microbial Ecology Lab is seeking applicants for one or two PhD graduate assistantships starting Fall 2017. Research in my lab focuses on the diversity and dynamics of microbiome along with the environmental gradients such as biogeochemical parameters, anthropogenic perturbation (climate change, antimicrobial agents etc) and spatial distribution. Research in my lab will involve field work (sampling and survey), lab work (genomic, transcriptomic and geochemical analyses) and computational work (multivariate statistics, geostatistics and statistical modeling). The student will have flexibility to explore questions that fall within the broad framework. The student is expected to have strong interests in ecology, microbiology, biogeochemistry and statistics. Applicants should be able to work independently, but also cooperatively with other members of the lab. An MS degree in biology, ecology, microbiology, or related field is preferred, though applicants without an MS degree, but with relevant research experience, will be considered. We offer a very competitive stipend with health insurance coverage and a full tuition waiver. Baylor affords outstanding research and teaching facilities. The Aquatic Ecology Lab is housed in the 500,000 sq. ft Baylor Sciences Building and recently moved into new expansion space to accommodate growth of the lab. Student offices are situated adjacent to the lab and other aquatic teaching and research labs, most notably the Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research, an analytical laboratory supporting a suite of water, soil, and tissue chemical analyses. A stable-isotope mass spectrometer lab is also down just down the hall, one of several multi-user shared facilities offering state-of-the-art instrumentation. Off campus, the 180-acre Lake Waco Wetlands supports our new Baylor Experimental Aquatic Research (BEAR) outdoor stream facility, one of the largest and most realistic experimental stream facilities in North America. Please review additional departmental admission guidelines for more information. If interested, please contact me with your research interests and CV at Sanghoon_Kang@baylor.edu. Posted: 9/21/16.

Bethune-Cookman University: The Integrated Environmental Science MS program is offering graduate fellowship awards to selected applicants. The funding is from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); and successful M.S. students will be affiliated to the Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems (CCME). Successful candidates will receive competitive financial supports for 4 semesters and are expected to conduct MS research in the fields of Coastal Resilience, Coastal Intelligence, and/or Place-base Conservation. Requirements: US Citizen, B.S. in a NOAA-related discipline, Bachelor's GPA of 3.3 or higher, Must be admitted to the MS IES program, Interested in coastal science, Committed to complete thesis research within 4 semesters. Preferred background: Successfully passed GIS and remote sensing courses with a grade of B or higher, Undergraduate research experiences. NOAA fellows will receive the following benefits while they are registered full-time in the MSIES program and maintain a GPA of 3.2 or above: Tuition scholarships for 4 semesters, Stipends of $1500/mo for 24 months, Center-wide competency course (mandatory), Networking with NOAA laboratories and scientists, Networking with CCME faculty and students. Interested applicant can contact: Hyun Jung ("J.") Cho, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Integrated Environmental Science, Bethune-Cookman University, 640 Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114. 386 481 2793, choh@cookman.edu. Posted: 10/13/16.

Binghamton University: The Prior lab conducts research on community ecology, antagonistic and mutualistic interactions (especially with insects and plants), environmental change (primarily invasive species), and conservation. I am seeking graduate students (PhD or MS) to join the lab. Students will be based at Binghamton University in NY, with opportunities to travel to field sites in the Pacific Northwest or Southern Ontario. BU also houses a 600-acre Nature Preserve that provides excellent opportunities to conduct research locally. I am looking for students to start in August 2017, but there is also potential to start as a graduate student in January 2017 or in the lab as a paid technician (Spring/Summer 2017). Qualified students with a BS or MS in Biology with background and interests in the ecology and evolution of species interactions, community ecology, and environmental change are encouraged to apply. I am seeking highly motivated students, who are excited about asking ecological questions and conducting research in the field. Research in my lab has a strong basis in experimental field ecology, but I am interested in students who want to integrate complementary approaches to address research questions. Students with substantial field experience who have worked as a part of a field team, are proficient in statistics, have proven scientific writing and communication skills, and are self-motived and independent will be the most competitive. Desirable qualifications also include experience with nutrient and chemical analysis, population genetics, modeling, identifying plants and insects, insect behavioral assays, or GIS/spatial statistics. I am especially interested in students who want to work on projects related to: 1) the role of tri-trophic interactions (host plant susceptibility and parasitoids) in facilitating the success of an invasive insect (field work in the Pacific Northwest), 2) parasitoid community assembly on novel/introduced insect hosts along invasion fronts (also in the PNW and other locations), 3) how traits of seed-dispersing ants (including an invasive ant) influence forest plant communities (fieldwork local and/or in southern Ontario at Koffler Scientific Reserve. There is also the potential to develop other project ideas related to species interactions and invasion ecology. Students will be supported by teaching assistantships (including waived tuition) through the Department or Biological Sciences and be a part of the EEB (Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior) group. Please send a cover letter stating why you would like the position and that highlights your qualifications and relevant skills. Also send a CV, GPA, GRE scores, and PDF reprints (if any) to Dr. Kirsten Prior (kprior@binghamton.edu). Please put “Graduate Assistantship” in the subject line of the email. Please contact me by November 30th. Qualified applicants will be invited to send in a formal application by January 15th to the Graduate School. Posted: 8/30/16, revised: 11/6/16.

Boise State University: Ph.D. Assistantship - A comparative phylogenomic and genes expression approach to investigate the evolution of CAM photosynthesis in dry-adapted plants, Boise State University, Idaho. GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP (Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior) - at Boise State University. A position is available for a motivated Ph.D. student to study the origin of genomic adaptations enabling plants to perform photosynthesis during periods of past aridification. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants use sunlight to synthesize nutrients from CO2 and water releasing oxygen as a by-product. Through this unique specificity, plants are actively involved in biogeochemical cycles, especially controlling the water, carbon and oxygen cycles and are supplying the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. However, photosynthesis is among the first processes to be affected by drought. Climatic studies predicted that global warming would impact water availability worldwide before the end of the century therefore threatening ecosystems’ functioning. In this context, it is paramount to investigate how plants sustained their photosynthetic processes during periods of past aridification. Such knowledge will allow developing models underpinning accurate predictions of the response of vegetation to droughts and design conservation programs. In addition, drought is responsible for the majority of global crop loss, so under­standing the mechanisms that plants have evolved to survive water stress is vital for engineering drought tolerance in crops. About 7% of flowering plants (ca. 16,000 species) have developed a type of photosynthesis (Crassulacean acid metabolism; CAM) allowing coping with droughts by minimizing evapotranspiration. Although the morphological and physiological features of CAM photosynthesis are well documented, the genomic processes triggering its emergence are still poorly known. The PhD candidate will investigate this question by using a multi-disciplinary approach combining gene expression patterns with phylogenomic tools using a group of dry-adapted terrestrial orchids as model. The student will have the opportunity to travel for fieldwork with collaborators. This position includes support in the form of research and teaching assistantships, tuition and fee waiver, and health insurance. We are seeking someone who 1) possess quantitative and programming skills (or a passion for developing these skills), 2) has field experience in collecting plants in tropical regions, 3) has an enthusiasm for studying evolution and genomics, and 4) enjoys working independently and as part of a team. Master’s degree, a background in analyzing next-generation sequencing data and interest in tropical botany is preferred but not necessary. Please address your qualification for each of these points in your cover letter. The position starts 14 August 2017. The Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior PhD is a new and modern graduate program. To Apply: send via email in a single file attachment (include your last name in the file name): a cover letter that states qualifications and career goals, a CV with the names and contacts for 3 references, copies of transcripts (unofficial are O.K.) and GRE scores and percentiles (not combined) to Sven Buerki (svenbuerki@boisestate.edu). Applications will be reviewed as they are received until 10 June 2017. If you do not have GRE scores by the deadline your application cannot be considered. Posted: 5/12/17.

Boise State University: The de Graaff lab is seeking a highly motivated doctoral student to start in the fall of 2017.The student will join the newly established Ecology, Evolution and Behavior PhD program in the Department of Biological Sciences. Research in the de Graaff lab broadly focuses how changes in climate and land-use affect ecosystem processes that drive the global carbon cycle. We are especially interested in understanding how plant root traits affect soil microbial function and biogeochemical cycles, how changes in litter input affect soil carbon stocks, and how changes in above-and belowground diversity impact ecosystem function. We work in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems located across the US using several established field sites and research centers such as the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) (ID), Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) experiments (located in ID and AZ), and the Sustainable Bioenergy Crop Research Facility at Fermilab National Environmental Research Park in northeastern IL. Minimum Qualifications: - B.S. Degree in Biology, Environmental Science, Soil Science or a related field - Highly self-motivated, independent, and creative thinkers that are enthusiastic about pursuing a career in ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. Boise State and the de Graaff lab are highly committed to diversity and access to research opportunities for underrepresented groups, including women. Thus, individuals from these groups are especially encouraged to apply. Interested students should contact Dr. Marie-Anne de Graaff by email (marie-annedegraaff@boisestate.edu) with a CV (including GPA and GRE scores) and a short discussion of research interests. Formal applications will be submitted through the Ecology, Evolution and Behavior graduate program. Posted: 4/3/17.

Boise State University: The Hillis lab in the Human-Environment Systems Center (HES) is recruiting graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the social dynamics and sustainability of human-environment systems. Students can work on any of a range of specific projects ongoing in the lab. Successful students will have a strong background in the computational / quantitative social sciences or ecology, or a desire to work hard to gain these skills. Based on their interest, students can apply to various degree programs including Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Anthropology, and Public Policy. Two years (pending adequate performance) of NSF-funded support are currently available and additional funding can be obtained through external grants or internal teaching and research assistantships. The position includes a competitive stipend, tuition waiver and health insurance. Interested students should send a brief cover letter expressing their research interests and relevant experience and a CV to vickenhillis@boisestate.edu. Posted: 1/16/17.

Boise State University: The de Graaff lab is seeking a highly motivated PhD student to start in the summer/fall of 2017. Research in the de Graaff lab broadly focuses on how changes in climate and land-use affect ecosystem processes that drive the global carbon cycle. The student will work on an NSF funded project that aims to understand how soil burial contributes to the persistence of soil organic carbon, and whether exposure to surface conditions can trigger the decomposition of ancient carbon. Understanding the source of organic carbon in deep soil horizons and the processes influencing its turnover is critical for predicting the response of this large carbon reservoir to environmental change and feedbacks to climate. The student will join the Ecology, Evolution and Behavior PhD program in the Department of Biological Sciences. The research will be conducted in collaboration with a team of supportive scientists from the University of WI-Madison, and the University of CA-Merced. Minimum Qualifications: a B.S. or M.S. degree in Biology, Environmental Science, Soil Science or a related field. We seek highly self-motivated, independent, and creative thinkers that are enthusiastic about pursuing a career in ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. To apply, please by email Dr. Marie-Anne de Graaff (marie-annedegraaff@boisestate.edu) a single PDF containing (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, (3) undergraduate and graduate school transcripts (unofficial copies are OK at this point); and (4) contact information for three references. The successful candidate will be invited to formally apply to the Ecology, Evolution and Behavior graduate program before January 20th 2017. Posted: 1/3/17.

Boise State University: The Carter and Barber labs seek applications for a Ph.D. graduate student to participate in a project titled “Using NASA resources to better inform wildlife conservation in the Anthropocene: Spatially predicting impacts of anthropogenic nightlight and noise on wildlife habitat integrity across the contiguous United States” funded by NASA’s Applied Sciences program. Student funding will be provided by both Research and Teaching Assistantships. The student will primarily be advised by Dr. Neil Carter (Human-Environment Systems) and co-advised by Dr. Jesse Barber (Biology) and work closely with both labs. The PhD student will be in the new Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior degree program. The student will help develop quantitative information to help explain how anthropogenic nightlight and noise alter wildlife habitat quality and connectivity over large spatial extents relevant to conservation planners. This new knowledge will help direct research and management toward those wildlife species and habitat corridors that are most vulnerable to anthropogenic sensory stimuli. The multi-institution project will enable the student to directly engage with other researchers from Boise State University, California State Polytechnic University, Utah State University, NASA, as well as the National Park Service. Minimum qualifications: • Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biology, Conservation, Ecology, Geography, or related field. • Strong quantitative skills, including proficiency using R and ArcGIS, or other statistical and GIS software. Preferred qualifications: • Master of Science (M.S.) in Biology, Conservation, Ecology, Geography, or related field • Experience modeling wildlife behavior, movement, and habitat. • Experience collecting, compiling, and analyzing large datasets. • Demonstrated research success through peer reviewed publications • Experience working in collaborative teams. Application: Please submit a cover letter indicating your interest and qualifications for this position. Attach a Curriculum Vitae that includes employment history (including dates of employment) and three professional references with contact information. Required documents should be emailed to: neilcarter@boisestate.edu. Review of documents will begin January 15, 2017. Posted: 1/3/17.

Boston University: Post-doc and graduate student positions in urban biogeochemical research are available in Lucy Hutyra’s lab in the Department of Earth & Environment. I am seeking a post-doc to start as soon as possible and PhD student(s) to start Fall 2017. Specific projects will focus on changes in carbon and nitrogen cycling with urban development and forest fragmentation using a combination of field observation, remote sensing, atmospheric measurements, and numeric models. Experience with satellite retrievals, GIS, and field observations required for the post-doctoral position, preferred for the student position(s). The Hutyra Lab investigates carbon dynamics in forest systems and urban areas, studying a range of topics including forest ecology, urban carbon and nitrogen cycling, land use change impact on ecosystem productivity, fossil fuel emission patterns and determinants, and climatic controls on ecosystem carbon exchange. The Department of Earth & Environment is highly interdisciplinary with particular strengths in remote sensing, environmental economics, and biogeochemistry. If interested, please send a letter with your research interests and a CV to Dr. Lucy Hutyra. Posted: 12/23/16.

Boston University: The Dietze lab is looking to recruit a number of grad students (PhD) for Fall 2017 working in a diverse range of systems to develop socially-useful ecological forecasts and address basic questions about the predictability of ecological systems. * I will be co-advising a student with Shannon LaDeau (Cary Institute) looking at forecasting ticks, tick-borne disease, and small mammal population dynamics. Student’s affiliation would be Boston Univ. but there is an opportunity to work both in Boston and at Cary. * I will be advising a student looking at forecasting plant phenology and land surface fluxes (carbon, water, energy). This project offers RA support on a new NSF Macrosystems project. Students will work together, and with students being advised by Co-PIs Jenny Talbot (BU, soil microbiome) and Kathleen Weathers (Cary Institute, GLEON, aquatic productivity and harmful algal blooms), to develop a common set of tools and compare analyses across these different systems. Analyses will focus on a regional to national scale using a combination of community data and early NEON data. * I will also be advising 1-2 students looking at leveraging a wide range of data about the terrestrial carbon cycle (field observations and experiments, monitoring networks, remote sensing, etc) to constrain global earth system models. This project offers RA support through existing NSF informatics projects, PEcAn and Brown Dog as well as considerable flexibility to tackle a wide range of potential questions using cutting edge statistical and informatics tools. More information is available on my lab webpage, linked above. Mike Dietze, Earth & Environment, Boston University, dietze@bu.edu. Posted: 12/13/16.

Boston University: Ph.D. Opportunity in Ecosystem Ecology & Biogeochemistry. I invite applications for doctoral work in my lab beginning fall 2017 in the areas of biogeochemistry, forest ecology, global change biology and related fields. Applicants should be independent and highly motivated with academic research and/or field experience in plant ecology, soil ecology or nutrient cycling. Funding is available to work on a project at Hubbard Brook examining the effects of climate change on forest productivity and nutrient dynamics in northern hardwood forests. This NSF-funded project aims to better understand how climate change affects biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen, carbon and water. Research in our lab covers a broad range of topics including human impacts on the global nitrogen cycle, the effects of urbanization on nitrogen and carbon cycling, nutrient inputs from fog to coastal forest ecosystems, and the role of disturbances in nutrient uptake by trees. Students in our lab participate in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Biogeoscience, which spans many departments including Biology, Earth & Environment, and Archaeology. The Graduate School at Boston University guarantees five years of salary for Ph.D. students. I encourage prospective students to contact me (ptempler@bu.edu) to discuss potential projects. Please use “Prospective Graduate Student” in the subject line. Formal review of applications will begin in our department December 7, 2016, but interested applicants should contact me any time. Pamela Templer, PhD. Posted: 11/9/16.

California Polytechnic State University: A MS position is be available in the Francis Lab to participate in multi-institution project funded by NASA’s Applied Sciences Program. The project is titled “Using NASA resources to better inform wildlife conservation in the Anthropocene: Spatially predicting impacts of anthropogenic nightlight and noise on wildlife habitat integrity across the contiguous United States.” The graduate student will participate in and lead various activities including: developing novel databases of sensitivities of avian species to anthropogenic nightlight and noise, creating and analyzing spatially-explicit maps of risks from those sensory stimuli to birds, and conducting local-level multivariate analyses of avian habitat quality. The graduate student will work with other researchers on the project from Boise State University, Utah State University, NASA, as well as the National Park Service. Cal Poly is located in San Luis Obispo on the Central Coast of California. Coursework will begin in the Biological Sciences Department in September 2017. A research assistantship, tuition waiver, summer salary and, possibly, teaching assistantship for 1-2 quarters, will support the selected applicant. Strong candidates will be self-motivated, have a bachelor’s degree in Biology, Conservation or a closely related field, a strong interest in quantitative analyses and the ability to work independently and with large collaborative teams. Individuals that can demonstrate strong writing and communication skills, possess experience using R and/or ArcGIS and working with large datasets and have evidence of success in previous projects, including publications and/or professional presentations will be given priority. Interested applicants should email the following items to Dr. Francis (cdfranci (at) calpoly.edu) as soon as possible for guidance on whether to formally apply: 1) A brief statement detailing the candidate’s (a) interest in obtaining a graduate degree focused on understanding and predicting avian sensitivities to anthropogenic sensory stimuli, (b) past research experience, and (c) professional goals; 2) CV or resume (including GRE scores) and 3) unofficial transcripts. Formal applications to Cal Poly’s MS program are due on Feb. 1, 2017. Posted: 1/3/17.

California State University, Bakersfield: Graduate research assistantship (MS in Biology) in plant physiological ecology to study plant water relations and hydraulics in the context of the ongoing drought in California. Work will examine plant hydraulics and water relations of key dominant woody plants along an elevation gradient in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The project will involve both strenuous field sampling and lab sampling. Experience in water relations is not essential, but a plus. The successful applicant will be part of a multidisciplinary NSF funded research grant studying drought and climate change in southern California. This awardee with receive a $28k scholarship per year guaranteed for one year, and pending satisfactory progress, can be extended to a second year. The awardee will be a fellow of our NSF funded Center for Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) that comes with travel support to at least one meeting annually as well as other support for travel and research equipment/supplies. This is a full time position and is ideally suited to students who wish to complete an MS prior to pursuing a PhD. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Brandon Pratt (rpratt@csub.edu) and be sure to put CREST Fellow in the subject line. To apply visit the CREST website. Posted: 1/26/17.

California State University, Northridge: Eco-Evo Lab is seeking outstanding candidates for the M.S. program in Biology. Research in our lab focuses on the interface between ecological and evolutionary processes. As community ecologists, we are interested in how species interactions affect species and genetic diversity in communities. In particular, we are interested in how rapid evolution affects species interactions, such as predation, competition, and mutualism. Moreover, as evolutionary biologists, we are interested in how interactions among multiple species in natural communities affect selection on traits and evolutionary trajectories. Our research combines theoretical and empirical approaches to tackle these questions. Current research projects in the lab focus on (1) how evolution affects the diversity and stability of bacteria and protozoa communities that live inside carnivorous pitcher plants, (2) genetic variation and evolution of symbiotic algae living on coral reefs, and (3) genetic diversity in invasive species in California grasslands. Students are encouraged to develop independent research projects in any of these systems. Northridge is located in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles and provides access to many different natural habitats. The location is within a short commute of Santa Monica and Hollywood. The Biology program at CSUN has a reputation of turning out excellent Master’s students who often continue on to top-tier Ph.D. programs. CSUN was recently recognized by Nature as one of the top 25 Rising Institutions for Research in North America. Our interactive group combines faculty and students from the Ecology & Evolution program and Marine Biology program. The ideal candidate will have previous research experience, familiarity with the R programming language, and a passion for science. Interested students should contact Casey terHorst (casey.terhorst@csun.edu). In your email, please describe your research interests, any previous research experience, and your career goals. Include a CV, if possible. Formal applications are due on February 15, but interested students should contact me well before then. Members of under-represented groups in ecology are especially encouraged to apply. Posted: 10/27/16.

Central Michigan University: Graduate student (1 Ph.D. and 1 M.S.) positions available in cichlid behavior and evolution in Dr. Dijkstra’s lab at Central Michigan University starting Fall 2017. Our current projects combine behavioral experiments and molecular biology to address the physiological basis of color signaling in cichlid fish. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Peter D. Dijkstra (dijks1p@cmich.edu). More for details and application instructions. Review of applicants will start Nov 15, 2016. Posted: 10/26/16.

Central Michigan University: Funded MS Positions (2), Biology Department, Institute for Great Lakes Research: Spatial Ecology and Reproductive Ecology of Native Freshwater Mussels. The Woolnough Lab will be accepting applications for 2 new MS students to begin Fall 2016. The two positions will both focus on the conservation of rare freshwater mussels. Responsibilities: The successful applicants will conduct a two-year, grant and TA supported research project on rare unionids in the Great Lakes Region. The MS students will combine field and laboratory techniques to assist in understanding the ecology of rare freshwater mussels. The successful applicants will work with Dr. Daelyn Woolnough at Central Michigan University to answer questions about the conservation of mussel species and communities, ultimately leading to a comprehensive thesis. Stipend support in the form of Research Assistantship and Teaching Assistantships (for top quality candidates) will be available through the school year. Graduate students in Biology receive full tuition waivers. MS Position #1: Will focus on fragmentation and relocation effects on endangered freshwater mussels. MS Position #2: Will focus on the reproduction ecology of rare freshwater mussels. Qualifications: The successful applicant should be highly motivated and have a B.S. in biology, zoology, ecology, aquaculture, fisheries or closely related field. Prior field experience (e.g., boats, snorkeling, SCUBA), interests in conservation biology, and working with aquatic invertebrates and/or unionid mussels, are assets. For MS Position #2 a background in microscopy with SEM experience is a requirement. Minimum academic qualifications for a position in the Woolnough Lab include 3.2 GPA (on a 4.0 system) and completion of GRE. Salary: ~$18k + tuition waiver. Closing Date: July 22nd, 2016 or earlier if competitive candidates apply. The candidate will be expected to begin August 29, 2016 for the Fall 2016 semester. Letters of interest and information described below should be emailed to Dr. Woolnough by July 22, 2016 or earlier. Please do not apply to the CMU Graduate School/ Biology Department without first contacting Dr. Woolnough. Send the following by email with the subject ‘FRESHWATER MUSSEL MS’ to Dr. Woolnough (wooln1d@cmich.edu) with all of the following information: 1) a cover letter explaining your interest, qualifications, and position interested in (#1, #2 or both) 2) a resume (CV) 3) copies of transcripts (unofficial ok) and GRE grades (unofficial OK- report grades in cover letter). 4) names and contact information for three academic references. Posted: 7/7/16.

Clemson University: The O'Halloran lab in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation currently has an opening for a Ph.D. student starting in summer or fall of 2017. We seek an enthusiastic and inquisitive student who is interested in understanding mechanisms of land-atmosphere interactions with particular focus on forests. Potential broad research topics include: environmental controls on managed forest productivity, coastal carbon cycling, aerosol new particle formation, albedo radiative forcing, and coastal forest disturbance ecology. The student will have the opportunity to work at two AmeriFlux sites in Virginia (switchgrass and loblolly pine) where Dr. O'Halloran is co-PI, as well as take a leading role in developing new flux tower sites in coastal South Carolina, where potential host ecosystems include longleaf pine forest, baldcypress-tupelo wetland forest, and saltwater marsh. A student with sufficient incoming transfer credits will spend one year completing coursework on main campus and then relocate to the Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology and Forest Science to join the lab group and complete their fieldwork and writing. A full research assistantship (including stipend and tuition waver) is available for three years, but students will also be encouraged to seek their own funding through national fellowships (e.g. USDA, NASA, NSF). The Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology and Forest Science is located just outside of historic Georgetown, SC. Under a long-term agreement with the Belle W. Baruch Foundation, the Institute is located on the 16,000-acre Hobcaw Barony at the southern end of the Waccamaw Neck and is just 35 miles south of Myrtle Beach and 60 miles north of Charleston. Hobcaw Barony is located on the Atlantic Ocean, bordered by Winyah Bay and North Inlet Estuary. The Institute is housed in a new 12,000 sq. ft. LEED-certified office building with an adjoining 7,000 sq. ft. laboratory and support facility. Temporary housing is available on site for visiting scientists and students in a new 10-bed cottage. Required Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in forestry, ecology, atmospheric science or other closely related environmental science. Strong quantitative abilities, self-motivation and desire to do field work in coastal South Carolina, where the work is physically demanding in a hot, humid environment. Preferred: M.S. degree (highly preferred) in forestry, ecology, atmospheric science or other closely related environmental science. Programming experience in MATLAB or R. Fieldwork experience in ecology or forestry. To apply, send a CV, unofficial GRE and TOEFL scores (if available) and a cover letter stating your previous experience, interest in this specific position, and future goals to Dr. O'Halloran. Review of applicants begins immediately. The official university deadline to apply for summer entry is March 15. Contact info and more details at the lab website, linked above. Posted: 2/9/17.

Clemson University: The Barrett Lab is accepting applications for two PhD positions to start August 2017. Applicants should be self-motivated and also capable of working as part of a team. The ideal applicant will have substantial experience in ecology or conservation biology, as well as competencies in statistical analysis, technical writing, and GIS. Applicants with M.S. degrees (or degrees that will be completed by the start date) are preferred. The projects associated with these positions are flexible, but will likely focus on the vulnerability of amphibians and reptiles to large-scale stressors such as land use change, climate change, or invasive species. These positions could be based in either Biological Sciences or Forestry and Environmental Conservation, depending upon funding availability and the student’s background. The students will be supported predominately by a Teaching Assistantship, so prior teaching experience is desired. To apply please submit (1) a cover letter explaining your interest in the position, your qualifications, and any specific research areas you hope to pursue at Clemson, and (2) a CV. Please be sure to include your GPA (undergrad and graduate), GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references somewhere within your CV. Documents should be submitted via email to Kyle Barrett (rbarre2@clemson.edu) as a single PDF file with the subject heading “PhD application”. Applications must be received by October 30, 2016 to receive full consideration. Posted: 9/29/16.

Clemson University: The Wildlife Ecology and Restoration Lab is currently looking to fill a PhD position that will focus on the impact of emerging infectious disease on animal community dynamics. While the student will be allowed some flexibility to develop questions of interest, it is expected that a major component of the identified student’s research will investigate the community-level response of bat communities across eastern North America in response to white-nose syndrome. Specifically, this project will build from recently completed research in New York which revealed altered spatial and temporal niche partitioning in sympatric bat species following the arrival of white-nose syndrome, and will evaluate the extent to which similar or divergent patterns exist across other assemblages and habitats in the eastern US. To address these questions, the student will both conduct field surveys and collaborate with managers and scientists (US FWS, USGS, Virginia Tech, and others) to compile and analyze existing datasets. The student will be based at Clemson, and jointly advised by Dr. David Jachowski and Dr. Susan Loeb. Field research costs are covered through existing grant support, and funding for the salary of the PhD student is secured for 4 years through a combination of research and teaching assistantships. Applicants must possess (or are expected to possess by start date) an MS degree in ecology, wildlife biology, or related field. Applicants should also have an interest in working with relatively large datasets to address questions in disease and community ecology, and conducting field work involving acoustical detection of bats. Priority will be given to applicants with advanced writing and quantitative skill sets that are evidenced by past peer-reviewed publications. To apply, please send a single PDF file with the subject line “Disease PhD Assistantship” containing (1) a cover letter outlining your interests, experience, and contact information, (2) a resume or CV, (3) GRE scores, (4) undergraduate/graduate transcripts, and (5) contact information for 3 references to Dr. David Jachowski at djachow@clemson.edu. Deadline for applications is October 5, 2016. Posted: 9/14/16.

Clemson University: Two Ph.D. graduate student assistantships are available for motivated students in the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at Clemson University, Clemson SC. One of the projects is on agricultural sustainability and focuses on the knowledge-based recapture and reuse of nitrogen and phosphorous in plant and animal byproducts. The primary emphasize of the project is to employ various plant-based amendments to tailor the nutrient release rates from these spent-waste materials, so as to match the nutrient demand of the crops. The applicants should have a good background in agronomy/soil ecology/soil fertility, and a strong aptitude to learn analytical and molecular techniques as required by the project. The second project would investigate factors contributing to honey bee colony losses and decline in bee abundance and diversity, focusing on neonicotinoids. The project will develop organ-level uptake and decay curves of neonicotinoid residue for model plants using pesticides of varying degrees of mobility, and correlational matrices will be constructed to predict the bioavailability of pesticides in pollen and nectar. The applicants should have a good background in ecology/plant physiology/entomology/toxicology. Candidates with knowledge and experience in operating chromatography-mass spectrometry platforms are preferred. For both positions, candidates with a Master degree in related fields are preferred. Candidates should be able to work independently as well as collaboratively as a part of a multidisciplinary team. Both positions are available starting immediately (Fall 2016 or Spring 2017) and offer tuition coverage and a competitive research assistantship stipend. Through a core analytical facility at Clemson University, the selected candidates will be provided additional professional development opportunities including training on advanced ultra-high resolution mass spectrometers, and in metabolomics and proteomics research. Interested applicants should email i) a cover letter explaining interest and experience, ii) an updated CV with GRE scores, and iii) an unofficial transcript to Nishanth Tharayil (ntharay@clemson.edu). Successful candidates that are identified will formally apply through Clemson University Graduate School. Close date 11/15/2016. Posted: 7/11/16.

Colorado State University: This project seeks to understand Brown Treesnake movement and invasibility in novel habitats using state-of-the-art telemetry techniques and modern statistical modeling. The resulting research is critical for ongoing management and conservation efforts in Pacific island ecosystems. More information. Last date to apply: June 16, 2017. Posted: 6/7/17.

Colorado State University: A PhD opportunity in the Forest Health lab is available in the Dept. of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. Research associated with this position will focus on building a comprehensive evaluation of wild pollinator biodiversity in rangeland and grassland habitats of Colorado, evaluating linkages between plant and pollinator functional traits, and assessing the effects of biotic and abiotic disturbances on pollinator abundance and functional diversity. Project data will be used to develop research publications, guide ecosystem management, and develop online calculator tools for natural resource managers. The successful candidate will have strong quantitative, writing, and field skills. Field work for this project is set to begin July 2017 with formal coursework beginning in fall semester 2017, so interested students are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. Applicants with MS-level research experience and/or experience in pollinator identification or Python programming are preferred. Interested candidates please send a CV and statement of interest to Seth Davis (Seth.Davis@colostate.edu). Posted: 4/3/17.

Colorado State University: A PhD opportunity is available in the Dept. of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. Research associated with this position will combine silvicultural and ecophysiological approaches to understand stand development and aboveground biomass accumulation in Gambel oak woodlands. This research will directly support management efforts related to fuel hazard management, ecosystem restoration, and C accounting. This position is available starting fall semester, 2017. Funding is provided for three years, and consists of a competitive stipend plus six semesters of in-state tuition. Successful applicants will have demonstrated the ability to organize and manage field research efforts at the graduate level, have strong quantitative and writing skills, and be proficient with analytical software such as SAS/R, ArcGIS, etc. Applicants with MS-level research experience in forest or woodland ecology, plant physiology, forest growth and yield study, or a closely related discipline are preferred. If interested, please send a CV and statement of interest to Seth Ex (seth.ex@colostate.edu). Posted: 3/27/17.

Colorado State University: I am seeking a PhD student for this summer/fall to begin work investigating the mechanisms of grass survival during extended drought. Recent research focused on drought-induced mortality of plants has focused on woody species and measurements have been made primarily on aboveground tissue. Perennial grasses, however, can resprout from belowground bud banks that can survive extreme conditions during drought, but an explanation for how these tissues can survive drought is unknown. I am looking for a student with a masters degree in plant ecophysiology, or related subject, and strong quantitative skills to work on this project and develop techniques to measure physiological processes on belowground plant tissue. If you are interested in this PhD opportunity,please send your CV and a brief statement of your background and interest to me at troy.ocheltree@colostate.edu. Posted: 3/20/17.

Cornell University: The Hendry lab is recruiting Ph.D. students to study host-microbe interactions. Specific research projects are flexible and dependent on the student’s interest. The Hendry lab uses comparative genomics, molecular evolutionary analysis, and ecological studies to understand bacteria-host interactions in a variety of systems. Much of the current work in the lab is focused on the interaction of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and hemipteran insects such as aphids. P. syringae is a common plant-associated bacterium and is also frequently found in numerous other habitats such as in precipitation and lakes and rivers. In addition to occupying diverse environmental niches, these bacteria can infect and kill a number of hemipteran insects. We are interested in understanding the mechanisms underlying this interaction, as well as the evolutionary and ecological outcomes for both the bacteria and insects, and the ecological and population dynamics of these partners in complex interspecific interactions and across habitats. Other ongoing projects include understanding genome reduction and the evolution of obligate host dependence in the luminous symbionts of marine fish, and investigating transmission and function of insect microbiomes. The lab is located in the Department of Microbiology and interacts with researchers across Cornell, particularly those working on symbiosis, insect-microbe interactions, and plant-pathogen interactions. Cornell has a vibrant and diverse community of researchers in the biological sciences, with particular strengths in microbiology, insect-microbe and insect-plant interactions, and host-microbe interactions more generally. Interested applicants can consider applying to the lab through the graduate fields of Microbiology or Entomology. Please email Dr. Hendry (th572@cornell.edu) for more information or to discuss research ideas! Posted: 8/23/16.

Czech Academy of Sciences: A four year PhD Studentship is available for a highly motivated candidate to explore how the environment and biotic factors structure host-parasitoid food webs. This collaborative project utilizes a novel food web model system of wild Drosophila species and their parasitoids from tropical Australia. The student will be involved in obtaining live Drosophila and parasitoid lines from the field and will use laboratory microcosm experiments to study how food web structure responds to changes in temperature and species composition. The experimental food webs will be surveyed using rearing and DNA metabarcoding. There will also be opportunities to develop the project in a direction of the student’s own choosing. The successful applicant will join the Laboratory of Experimental Ecology at the Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre, Czech Academy of Sciences, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic, under the supervision of Dr Jan Hrcek. The laboratory is part of the Department of Ecology, a dynamic multinational centre for interaction network research with regular publications in leading journals [ http://www.plantanimalinteractions.com ]. The student will be co-supervised by Prof. Owen Lewis (University of Oxford) and will be in regular contact with the Community Ecology group at Oxford. The deadline for applications is January 16th 2017, with possible start date from mid February 2017 onwards. The student will receive a salary which comfortably covers living expenses in the Czech Republic. The salary will be composed of stipend from the University of South Bohemia and part time employment at Biology Centre CAS. The working language is English and applicants from all countries are eligible. Required: · A master’s degree (non-negotiable requirement for PhD study in the Czech Republic) · A strong educational track record in biological sciences · Very good written and spoken English · Interest in community ecology. Desirable: · Research experience with laboratory experiments, insect ecology or molecular ecology · Driving licence and fieldwork experience · Experience in ecological statistics or bioinformatics · Experience with molecular laboratory work. To apply please send one document with your CV, contact details for two references, and cover letter stating qualifications, previous work and motivation to Jan Hrcek [ janhrcek@gmail.com ]. Posted: 12/13/16.

Dartmouth College: The doctoral program in Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems, and Society seeks applicants for a graduate fellowship focusing on the ecology, economics, and governance of ecosystem services to begin in the Fall of 2017. Potential research topics might include the science and policy of carbon storage in temperate forests, the use of deliberative multicriteria analysis in managing forests and watersheds, and the bioeconomics of forest insect pests. The ideal candidate will have an interdisciplinary background that includes aspects of environmental science and economics plus demonstrated capability in research. The EEES graduate program offers a cross-cutting intellectual environment, ample resources for graduate students, and a committed faculty. To initiate an application, please e-mail a CV and statement of interest to Richard Howarth (RBHowarth@Dartmouth.edu). Applications should be completed by 1 December 2016. Posted: 9/13/16.

East Carolina University: A MS graduate student assistantship is available in the area of socioeconomic-ecological systems modeling. The student will work on an EPA-funded interdisciplinary project led by Dr. Jacob Hochard (Dept. of Economics & Institute for Coastal Science and Policy) in collaboration with Drs. Randall Etheridge (Dept. of Engineering & Center for Sustainability) and Ariane Peralta (Dept. of Biology). The MS student will work closely with economics, biology and engineering faculty at ECU, as well as a PhD student in Coastal Resources Management. The qualified candidate will have strong undergraduate training in ecology, biogeochemistry, or environmental science. Ideally, the student will have some knowledge of GIS, hydrology, and biogeochemical processes. Candidates with an interest in interdisciplinary research and a familiarity or willingness to learn social-ecological modeling approaches are encouraged to apply. The project will be focused on modeling relationships between biophysical factors and water and air quality on human health outcomes to understand how natural capital can contribute to nutrient pollution mitigation in coastal watersheds. Visit www.peraltalab.com for more information. To apply, please contact Drs. Ariane Peralta (peraltaa@ecu.edu) and Randall Etheridge (etheridgej15@ecu.edu) with your CV, unofficial transcript(s), GRE scores, and a short statement describing prior research experience and interests. Review of full applications to the MS biology program will begin on February 15, 2017. Posted: 1/16/17.

East Carolina University: The McCoy lab in the Department of Biology invites applications from prospective PhD students for Fall 2017 to collaborate on an NSF-funded project on rock pool food webs. Changes in predator diversity via extinction and invasion are increasingly widespread, often with dramatic ecological and socio-economic consequences. However, we still lack the ability to predict how changes in predator diversity cascade through foodwebs and affect ecosystem functions. The funded project integrates natural history, ecological theory, field surveys, experiments, and development of new statistical tools to advance our understanding of the relationship between predator biodiversity, prey populations, and ecosystem function and services. The research will be centered on river rock pools which serve as a tractable natural model system found throughout the Southeastern USA. The collaborative research team includes myself (Mike McCoy), and Ben Bolker, James Vonesh, and Jeremy Wojdak. Graduate students will develop independent research projects that fit within the larger framework of the grant. The ECU Biology raduate program offers competitive stipends, tuition waivers, and there will be ample support for fieldwork available. Successful candidates will have prior research experience, a strong interest in developing quantitative skills, and be highly self-motivated. Prospective students should review my website for additional information and then contact me with a letter of interest, and CV. Posted: 9/21/16, revised: 12/14/16.

Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald: we seek a scientist (65%) (PhD-position) within the joint research project „Wetscapes“ (matter and nutrient cycling in wet organic soils as basis for land use, climate response and water protection) at the working group „Experimental Plant Ecology“ with Prof. Dr. Jürgen Kreyling, at the Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität in Greifswald, Germany. You will quantify production and decomposition of above- and below-ground biomass at different mire sites by field monitoring and experimental analyses in an interdisciplinary team and analyse and publish the resulting data. Desirable is a focus on plant ecology and biogeochemistry and expertise in mire or wetlands ecology. The preparation of a PhD-theses within the project is expected (the PhD thesis should be submitted in English as a collection of peer-reviewed papers, i.e. a “cumulative thesis”). The position starts 1 March 2017 and is limited to three years and four months. Please apply no later than January 1st, 2017, at www.wetscapes.uni-rostock.de/en/positions/. Posted: 12/12/16.

Florida International University: The Department of Earth and the Environment has a Ph.D. assistantship available for a student interested in plant community ecology. The ideal candidate will have some experience in vegetation ecology, vegetation-environment relationships, and geographic information systems (GIS). The research will focus on ecological processes involved in vegetation responses to change in hydrologic and fire regimes in both short- and long-hydroperiod ecosystems in the Florida Everglades. Assistantship covers stipend of $23k and tuition. To be eligible for the position, students must meet FIU graduate admission requirements (select Earth Systems Science). The deadline for the graduate (PhD) application for Spring 2018 admission in the Department of Earth & Environment is Aug 1st, 2017. To be considered for Spring 2018 admission with PhD Research Assistantship, please reply by May 31st, 2017 to Dr. Jay Sah (sahj@fiu.edu) with a CV and statement of interest. For information about our past and ongoing projects, see the South Florida Terrestrial Ecosystems Lab homepage. Posted: 5/1/17.

Florida International University: The Rehage lab is seeking a Ph.D. student interested in the ecology of coastal fishes for Fall 2017. Dates: Desired start date is Fall 2017 (application deadline is February 1, 2017). We seek a motivated student with a passion for fish, ecology/fisheries and scientific inquiry. The research will focus on understanding the ecology of coastal fishes in the Everglades, including key recreational species such as common snook, tarpon, Florida largemouth bass, their prey, and how these species respond to hydroclimatic variation, particularly the balance of ecosystem restoration and climate change. The position is associated with Everglades restoration, providing an opportunity for the research to be directly linked to management decisions and restoration efforts, and for outreach and collaboration with recreational anglers. The ideal candidate will have a passion and experience in fish ecology and/or fisheries, excellent writing and quantitative skills, previous fish/fisheries field experience and an interest in interdisciplinary collaborations and local partnerships with recreational anglers and fishing guides. Boating and angling experience are highly desired. To apply: please contact Dr. Jenn Rehage at rehagej@fiu.edu. In your email please tell us about yourself (research interests and experience, fit to our lab, long term career goals, and your numbers-undergraduate GPA and GRE scores). Please attach a 1) CV with references, 2) unofficial copies of college transcripts, and 3) GRE scores (preferably as a single PDF). Please title your email ‘PhD applicant Fall 2017 + your name.’ Our graduate program deadline is February 1, 2017. Posted: 1/3/17.

Florida International University: A Ph.D. fellowship is available in the Department of Earth and Environment to conduct research at the Cultural and Ecological Field Station at the Deering Estate, Miami, FL, beginning Fall 2017. The position is affiliated with the Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research program and will include integrative field and experimental research approaches and public outreach. FIU is a public research university in Miami with a highly diverse, vibrant, and growing student body located near the eastern boundary of the Everglades. The Department of Earth and Environment is dedicated to understanding the natural world and its interactions with human systems to build the skills and understanding needed for sustainable societies. The FCE LTER student organization, based at FIU, is a very active community of over 70 students from multiple departments and institutions who conduct integrative, multidisciplinary, long-term research. To be eligible for positions, students must meet FIU graduate admission requirements and successfully compete for a teaching assistantship (see below) to match existing research assistantship support. Highly qualified candidates may be eligible for fully funded Presidential Fellowships. The deadline for graduate applications is January 5, 2017, but earlier submission is encouraged. The Cultural and Ecological Field Station is a new, innovative station located at the Deering Estate in Miami, FL. The station includes representative patches of all of South Florida’s unique habitats and includes a demonstration project for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan that explores the process of rehydrating Everglades wetlands and estuaries. The selected student will explore the political ecology of the ongoing restoration of the urban watershed within the Deering Estate, using historical sources, and developing and applying an integrated socio-ecological approach. Candidates should have a strong academic background in ecology, environmental studies and/or geography, and interests in landscape ecology, restoration ecology, environmental policy, and/or political ecology. Students will be co-advised by Michael Ross and Gail Hollander in the Departments of Earth and Environment and Global & Sociocultural Studies, respectively. Interested applicants should contact us at rossm@fiu.edu or hollande@fiu.edu and visit our lab websites (softel.fiu.edu and http://miamiultra.fiu.edu/). To apply, provide a CV and letter of interest. Full applications must be received by January 5, 2017. The selected candidate will join an existing collaborative team of graduate students, FIU faculty, as well as other scientists working at the Deering Estate, with a shared goal of understanding and forecasting community and ecosystem changes in coastal wetland ecosystems exposed to sea-level rise and large-scale freshwater restoration. Posted: 11/21/16.

Florida State University: The Hughes lab is recruiting new graduate students in Fall 2017. The lab is broadly interested in evolutionary, ecological and behavioral genetics and genomics. Our goal is to understand how natural selection, mediated by the physical, biological, and social environment, interacts with other evolutionary processes to maintain genetic diversity in ecologically important traits. We want to know how much of the ubiquitous genetic diversity in natural populations is adaptive and how much is non-adaptive, and we are interested in the consequences of both kinds of variation for individuals, populations, and species. We work mainly with natural populations of poeciliid fish and fruit flies, but are open to students who wish to study other organisms. We use techniques that include field studies, lab and field experiments, and genetic, genomic and behavioral analysis. Students are encouraged to develop their own projects within this broad framework. Current student projects include investigating the interaction of inheritance and social environment in determining alternative male life histories in mollies, the genetic and genomic consequences of sexual selection and mate preference in guppies; genetic, social, and physiological modifiers of aggression and dominance in mosquitofish, and the genetics and evolution of immunity and aging in fruit flies. The Ecology and Evolution Graduate Program at FSU has a long history of excellence in student training and research, and includes many faculty with overlapping interests at the interface of ecology, evolution, and genetics. Graduate students are provided with teaching or research assistantships which supply a stipend, and with tuition waivers and health insurance. FSU also offers competitive graduate Fellowships, which have an early deadline for application. The Tallahassee area is a hotspot for biodiversity and offers access to diverse habitats including terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Interested students should contact Kim Hughes (kahughes@bio.fsu.edu) prior to applying to the graduate program and to discuss application procedures. Posted: 9/13/16.

George Washington University: We are looking for a graduate student to join our research group beginning in fall semester 2017. The student would develop an independent research focus in line with ongoing lab projects. We are exploring how plant traits relate to community structure and function of fungi (e.g., decomposition, pathenogenisis) using culturing and next generation sequencing techniques and the consequences of these interactions for the forest carbon cycle in locations around the globe as climate changes. Additionally, we are looking at the evolution, ecology and physiology of plants across environmental gradients in various locations around the globe. The student would join an interactive lab group that broadly focuses on plant and microbe structure and function (anatomy and physiological ecology), community ecology, and evolutionary ecology, both in the temperate and tropical areas. The graduate work will be completed at George Washington University. Washington, DC is a dynamic city with a wealth of ecologists and evolutionary biologists. We have strong links to area institutions, including the Smithsonian. George Washington University is located in the heart of DC, with easy access to numerous science, conservation, and policy based institutions. If you are interested in working with us, please send an email to me (Amy Zanne: aezanne@gmail.com) with brief details about your GPA, GRE, research interests, experience, and why you want to go to graduate school. For information about applying to the program, go to the Department of Biological Sciences website. The application deadline is 1 December 2016. I am also happy to answer any further questions you might have. Posted: 10/28/16.

Georgetown University: The Department of Biology has multiple opportunities for doctoral study in ecology, evolution and behavior (EEB). Georgetown faculty are dedicated to the development of doctoral candidates into insightful and skilled scientists, scholars and teachers. Funding for graduate study is supported by a combination of assistantships, teaching fellowships and research grant support. Our program and institution welcomes students of all racial, ethnic and religious backgrounds. Students interested in any of the opportunities listed below are strongly encouraged to contact the relevant faculty member(s) via email. See Department of Biology graduate program and graduate school application procedures and deadlines. Molecular basis of adaptation: Dr. Peter Armbruster seeks a highly motivated PhD student to join his laboratory’s research program on the molecular basis of adaptation in natural populations. The Armbruster lab is currently focusing on the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus. This mosquito invaded the US in 1985 and spread rapidly over approximately 15 degrees of latitude. A major focus of work in the Armbruster lab is the use of transcriptome sequencing and genomics approaches to elucidate the genetic basis and molecular physiology of photoperiodic diapause in Ae. albopictus. Interested students should contact Dr. Peter Armbruster (paa9@georgetown.edu). Ecological interactions, behavior & learning: Research in Dr. Martha Weiss’s lab focuses on ecological interactions (between plants and animals, as well as predator and prey), with an emphasis on behavior and learning. Ongoing or recent projects include investigations of the ecological factors supporting shifts in host plant usage, butterfly and caterpillar learning, retention of memory across complete metamorphosis, and the ecological context of defecation behavior. We are also working on development of hands-on science curricular materials, mostly related to plants and insects, for use in K-12 classrooms. We seek an outstanding graduate student interested in these or related projects. Butterfly responses to climate change: Dr. Leslie Ries is seeking a PhD student interested in field, laboratory and data-intensive approaches to ecology to join her lab’s research program on butterfly responses to climate change. The Ries lab uses both experimental approaches, measuring thermal tolerances of caterpillars in the lab and data-intensive approaches, exploring large-scale spatiotemporal patterns using data sets mostly derived from citizen science monitoring programs. Students with previous independent research experience and/or excellent quantitative or computational skills will be given precedence. In addition, the ability to start work during the summer of 2017 would be highly advantageous. Interested students should contact Dr. Leslie Ries (Leslie.Ries@georgetown.edu). Disease ecology and network epidemiology: Dr. Shweta Bansal is seeking outstanding PhD students to collaborate on mathematical modeling projects for infectious disease dynamics. The Bansal Lab focuses on the feedback between host behavior and disease transmission using tools from network theory, statistical modeling, and computer science. Current study systems include influenza in humans, pathogen spread in ant colonies, and foot and mouth disease in cattle, with support from the NIH and NSF. Interested students should contact Dr. Bansal (shweta.bansal@georgetown.edu) with a description of their research interests. Behavioral ecology, development, reproduction & life history of Bottlenose Dolphins: Professor Mann is seeking outstanding PhD students in 2016-17 to collaborate on one or both of her field studies: (1) a 30 year study of wild bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia or (2) a new study initiated in 2015 focusing on wild bottlenose dolphins in the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. Although members of her lab focus on a variety research questions related to behavioral development, life history, female reproduction, social networks, conservation, human impacts, and spatial ecology, we have two central foci: (1) maternal effects on offspring social, ecological and behavioral development (with Dr. Frère); and (2) information and disease transmission in wild populations. Dr. Mann collaborates extensively with Dr. Lisa Singh in Computer Science and Dr. Shweta Bansal in Biology. She also has a long-term collaboration with Dr. Celine Frère at University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia focused on examining genetic and non-genetic sources of variation in dolphin behavior, ecology and life history. Biodiversity in a Changing World: The Wimp lab seeks to understand the natural forces that structure population and community diversity, and the human factors that erode diversity and alter ecosystem function. We use experimental field and greenhouse approaches as well as observational studies to examine: the impacts of human nutrient inputs and habitat fragmentation on multi-trophic interactions, how biotic and abiotic factors interact to affect food web structure and ecosystem processes, and how landscape features affect population genetic diversity and species interactions. Our research focuses on intertidal salt marshes, where land development, agricultural runoff and sea level rise are currently jeopardizing coastal wetlands at an alarming rate. These habitats provide critical buffer communities, feeding areas for birds, nurseries for invertebrates, and play a key role in the geology of wave-protected shorelines and in global carbon sequestration. Understanding how human alterations to salt marshes affect population, food web, community, and ecosystem processes is therefore important at local as well as global scales, and has both ecological and economic implications. Interested students should contact Dr. Gina Wimp (gmw22@georgetown.edu). Population genetics and molecular evolution: Dr. Matthew B. Hamilton is seeking students interested in using genetic marker data to test fundamental hypotheses in population genetics and molecular evolution. On-going empirical projects include using transcriptome-scale data to infer possible causes of molecular clock variation in plants, studying temporal variation in striped bass genetic effective population size, and testing for the ecological causes of changes in genetic variation in salt marsh insects. The lab also develops software for estimation of population genetic parameters, and carries out simulation studies to better predict population genetic patterns. The ideal project in the Hamilton lab would combine empirical genetic marker data collection with mathematical or computer simulation work to develop novel expectations or hypothesis tests. Interested students should contact Dr. Hamilton (hamiltm1@georgetown.edu). Posted: 10/13/16.

Georgia Institute of Technology: I am seeking at least one Ph.D. student to join my lab in the School of Biological Sciences in fall 2017. Research in my lab focuses on community ecology, with current work involving biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, community assembly, phylogenetic community ecology, and experimental evolution. Students who are interested in any aspects of community ecology will be considered. The successful applicants will have the opportunity to work in the lab (e.g., microcosm-based research) and/or in the field (e.g., studying plant and insect biodiversity on the Thousand-Island-Lake islands in China), and will have much freedom to develop their own research projects. Ph.D. students in our department are provided with competitive stipends, in the forms of fellowships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships. Please feel free to contact me (lin.jiang@biology.gatech.edu) if you have any questions. See our graduate application website. Application deadline is December 16, 2016. Posted: 11/15/16.

Georgia Southern University: I am recruiting 1-2 Masters students to start in the Biology Department in Fall of 2017! I am looking for self-motivated students with an interest in functional morphology, biomechanics, ecology, and evolution of fishes. Current work in the lab is examining the coordination, or integration, between locomotion and feeding during prey capture in fishes. Master's student(s) will participate in a project examining local adaptation and performance in local Centrarchid fishes, including characterizing the habitat of sampling sites. However, I also encourage students to develop their own interests within this scope. Tuition and stipend support will primarily be in the form of teaching assistantships, but other opportunities are available, including a summer supplement. Partial support for research and travel will also be available. I expect students to apply for external funding to supplement these funds. I encourage interaction with both scientists and non-scientists through collaboration, conference attendance, publications, online media, and outreach events. I support student creativity in these efforts. GSU is part of the University System of Georgia and is located in Statesboro, about 1 hour west of Savannah. The Biology Department consists of approximately 40 faculty with interests ranging from cell and molecular biology to ecology and evolution. Resources that would be available to graduate students include a new LEED certified research and teaching building, animal housing facilities, microscopes, boats, a museum collection with regional fishes, and collaborations with field stations throughout Georgia. Interested students should make sure they meet the admission requirements and contact Dr. Emily Kane at ekane@georgiasouthern.edu with a statement of interest and CV. The application deadline for Fall 2017 admission is March 1, 2017. More information on the graduate program: http://bit.ly/GSU_BioGradProgram | http://bit.ly/GSU_MSBiology. Posted: 1/11/17.

Georgia Southern University: Plant traits and climate change (MS). The Sendall lab in the Department of Biology invites applications for a Masters Degree in plant ecology and physiology to begin in Fall 2017. Students should be interested in answering questions such as the following: - How do plant functional traits respond to changes in temperature and precipitation? - Do distinct ecotypes from throughout species’ ranges differ in their ability to respond to altered climatic conditions with respect to morphological and physiological traits? A degree in ecology, environmental science, etc. is encouraged for applicants, as is prior field experience measuring plant traits. Other desirable qualifications are the ability to work well independently and effectively as part of team, excellent written and oral communication skills, and a desire to conduct field-based research. Prospective students should email Dr. Kerrie Sendall (ksendall@georgiasouthern.edu) a short summary of their research interests and a CV that includes GRE scores (if taken) prior to submitting an application. We offer multiple teaching assistantships each semester that are awarded on a competitive basis, and funding may also be available from research assistantships and fellowships. More information about the biology graduate program. Additional questions about the GSU graduate program can be directed to Dr. Checo Colon-Gaud (jccolongaud@georgiasouthern.edu). The application deadline is March 1st, 2017 for full consideration. Posted: 12/15/16.

Georgia Southern University: A Masters assistantship is available in the Department of Biology, with an intended start date in January 2017. In collaboration with university and agency investigators, the student will be expected to contribute to two ongoing research projects, and develop a thesis project within one of these research themes: (1) Development of monitoring approaches to assess spawning success of Robust redhorse populations; and (2) Understanding relationships between anthropogenic stressors, stream hydrology, and the ecology of fishes on the Atlantic coastal plain. The assistantship includes a tuition waiver and stipend for two years, to be funded through a combination of teaching and research duties. The student also will assist in the field and lab activities of other members of the Roberts lab. Along with course work and a completed thesis, these activities will lead to the completion of M.S. degree in Biology. More information about the graduate program. Required qualifications include (1) a B.S. in Fisheries, Ecology and Evolution, Biology, or a related field, (2) excellent interpersonal, written, and oral communication skills, and (3) strong self-motivation and ability to work well independently and with a team. Preferred qualifications include (1) previous field research experiences in aquatic systems, (2) strong analytical skills, including experience conducting statistical analyses of ecological or fisheries datasets, and (3) demonstrated scientific writing ability, such as authorship of a scientific publication, report, or senior thesis. Persons interested in the position should contact Dr. Jamie Roberts (jhroberts@georgiasouthern.edu; 912-478-4687). To apply, email the following as a single pdf file: (1) statement of research background and interests, (2) curriculum vitae or resume, (3) names and contact information for three academic or professional references, (4) GRE scores, and (5) an unofficial copy of your college transcript. Review of applications will begin on 30 September 2016. Posted: 9/20/16.

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research: The German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) is currently seeking a large number of Postdoctoral (9) and PhD (8) scientists as part of its ‘Flexpool’ mechanism. Positions are based in different research groups (typically in Leipzig, Jena or Halle) and will collaborate with scientists from across the iDiv consortium. For more information on how to apply, see: Flexpool positions. Applications are due January 1. Let me (jonathan.chase@idiv.de) or any of the sponsoring scientists know if you have any questions. Postdoc positions: -Socio-economics of biodiversity conservation -Community ecology of butterflies -Forest ecology -Land-use impacts -Science-policy interface -Ecosystem functioning study through remote-sensing data -Multiplex sequencing methodology -Plant system study and soil ecology -Microbial and chemical diversity synthesis PhD positions: -Evolution of viruses within host communities -Social-ecological systems, biodiversity and ecosystem services -Bioinformatics of plant communities -Science education -Soil microbial ecology -Microbial community ecology -Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning -Biodiversity conservation. Posted: 12/12/16.

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research: We have a position opening for a PhD student interested in testing the influence of temperature on co-existence and community stability using theoretical and microbial model systems approaches. More information and application instructions (pdf). Supervisors: Antonis Chatzinotas, Susanne Dunker, Stanley Harpole, Jes Hines, Ellen Latz, Björn Rall. Deadline: 1 January 2017. Posted: 11/29/16.

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research: There is a PhD position open in my group at iDiv in Halle-Jena-Leipzig. This position would be ideal for someone interested in combining biological and computational approaches towards achieving synthesis in our understanding of biodiversity patterns/processes. The specific PhD project will lead efforts towards synthesizing species-energy relationships (aka productivity-diversity relationships) and the processes underlying this fundamental biodiversity gradient by applying tools we are developing that allow the dissection of species richness into its constituent parts and across scales. The project will include a combination of meta-analysis of published data, analyses of global datasets (using marine fishes and/or trees), analyses of continental/regional and island datasets (using trees, birds, and/or freshwater organisms), and/or field work using globally distributed grassland vegetation plots. Opportunities also exist for getting involved in related collaborative projects, as well as participating in international working groups to achieve synthesis (i.e., through sDiv, the synthesis centre of iDiv). More details on the position, application procedure, etc. (pdf). Deadline: August 1, 2016. Posted: 7/12/16.

Guangxi University: The Plant Ecophysiology and Evolution Group, Conservation Biology Group and Forest Dynamics Research Laboratory at Guangxi University (Nanning, China) are seeking highly motivated and productive International MSc and PhD students to engage in 3-4 year projects, starting in 2017, in the following research fields: (1) Plant Ecophysiology -A: Plant Physiological Ecology including water relations -B: Functional Plant Anatomy -C: Photosynthesis and Photoprotection -D: Functional traits and community assembly of subtropical forests Projects are supervised by Prof. Kun-Fang Cao (kunfang.cao@gxu.edu.cn or caokf@xtbg.ac.cn) and Associate Prof. Shidan Zhu (zhushidan@gxu.edu.cn) . (2) Biodiversity Genomics -A: Plant Genomics and Evolutionary Diversification -B: Molecular Systematics and Plant Taxonomy -C: Historical Plant Biogeography and Biome Assembly Projects are supervised by Associate Prof. Joeri S. Strijk (jsstrijk@gxu.edu.cn). More information: http://www.asianfagaceae.com/. (3) Genetics -A: Ecological Genomics. -B: Conservation Genetics. Projects are supervised by Associate Prof. Alison Wee (alisonwks@gmail.com). (4) Seed Ecophysiology -A: Seed Ecology and Physiology Projects are supervised by Associate Prof. Uromi Goodale (uromi.goodale@outlook.com). (5) Ecophysiology and Coevolution -A: Plant Ecophysiology of Mangroves. -B: Phylogenetics and Coevolution in Gymnosperms. Projects are supervised by Dr. Jiang Guofeng (gfjiang@gxu.edu.cn). (6) Ecology -A: Animal Behaviour. -B: Breeding and Nesting Ecology. -C: Ecotoxicology. -D: Social and Economic Influences on Conservation Species Interaction Networks. -E: Urban Ecology. Projects are supervised by Faculty members of the Conservation Biology Group (Prof. Eben Goodale (eben.goodale@outlook.com), Dr. Aiwu Jiang, Dr. Christos Mammides, Dr. Myung-bok Lee, Dr. Ari Martinez). (7) Tropical Forest Botany and Ecology -A: Biodiversity Monitoring Forest Plots in Guangxi Province. -B: Distribution and composition of the Philippine Island Flora: phylogenetics, ecological features, plant functional and reproductive traits. Projects are supervised by Prof James V. LaFrankie of the Forest Dynamics Research Laboratory. The International Graduate Program at the College of Forestry offers fully funded MSc and PhD Fellowships for 3-4-year projects, with complete waivers for tuition fees and housing fees. Housing is provided in the International Student dormitories of the campus in Nanning. The first year will consist of orientation and study of Chinese language through courses in combination with introductory courses taught by faculty members of the three research groups. The other three years will be filled with fieldwork, professional courses and the research project. Project applications are now invited for starting dates of projects in September 2017. The application deadline is March 31, 2017. More details. To apply for any of these positions, please email a statement of research interests and goals, a curriculum vitae, and the email addresses of three references directly to the individual project leaders. Posted: 11/23/16.

Heriot-Watt University: two PhD positions in energy geoscience at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. 1. Role of the world's deepest living marine algae in the global carbon cycle 2. Quantifying the biological effects of leakage from Carbon Capture and Storage sites to optimize early warning indicators for CO2 leakage (pdf). Closing Date: 31st January 2017. Posted: 11/29/16.

Humboldt State University: Dr. Harold Zald (hsz16@humboldt.edu) is seeking 2-3 highly motivated MS students to join the recently created Forest Measurements and Ecology Lab to use dendrochronology (tree-rings) to quantify forest responses to drought stress in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath Ecoregions of California. Two projects in the Southern Sierra Nevada will collect and analyze tree-ring data to quantify how restoration treatments (thinning and prescribed burning) influence tree growth, determine if treatments alter tree growth responses to drought stress, and characterize growth patterns between trees that have lived and died during the current California drought. Additionally, one of the projects in the Sierra Nevada will use carbon stable isotopes to understand fundamental physiological responses of trees to treatments and drought stress. The third project will occur in the Klamath Ecoregion of Northern California, integrating tree-ring data collected in old-growth forests with satellite imagery to validate and map changes in forest productivity over the past three decades. For additional information about the projects and how to apply, please see the opportunities page. Applicants are being considered to begin field work in June 2017 and enroll in graduate school Fall semester of 2017. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until 2-3 potential students have been selected. Posted: 12/6/16.

Humboldt State University: The USGS California Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research unit is seeking two highly motivated students to join our lab in the Fisheries Biology department at Humboldt State University. Candidates with interests in marine ecology, community ecology, fisheries management, and ecological modeling are especially encouraged to apply. One project will use acoustic methods to quantify the density of potential salmonid predators in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. This study is part of a larger project that seeks to assess juvenile chinook salmon mortality due to predation during their outmigration. Primary duties will include fieldwork to measure predator densities with hydroacoustics and electroshocking, processing of the acoustic data, statistical analysis, and manuscript preparation. The other student will study the impacts of aquaculture on the benthic and epibenthic invertebrate community in Humboldt Bay. This research will be used to inform ecosystem models under development to inform management decisions regarding aquaculture practices. Primary duties will include fieldwork to collect invertebrate samples, laboratory sorting and identification of invertebrates, statistical analysis, and manuscript preparation. Both positions require a B.S. in biology, ecology, marine science, or related field and have an anticipated start date of January 2017. The salary for both assistantships is $18k per year for 2 years and include some tuition assistance. To apply, please submit a brief description of interests, CV, and transcripts to Dr. Mark Henderson (mark.henderson@humboldt.edu). Posted: 9/14/16.

Imperial College London: The Quantitative and Modelling Skills in Ecology and Evolution (QMEE) CDT is pleased to announce 8 NERC-funded PhD studentships plus 4 institutional PhDs starting in October 2017. The QMEE CDT will train a cohort of researchers in Ecology and Evolution with the quantitative and modelling skills to solve real-world problems by connecting theory, data, and practice. To view example projects, instructions on how to apply and information on eligibility please visit our website, linked above. The deadline for applications is 19th January 2017. For any questions, please contact Ibi Wallbank, Departmental Manager, at qmee.cdt@imperial.ac.uk. Posted: 12/12/16.

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis: The Ecohydrology and Biogeochemistry lab at IUPUI seeks two motivated students interested in pursuing a MS or PhD (Applied Earth Sciences) degree in the Department of Earth Sciences. Two federal funded projects are available to support the students’ endeavors. One NSF funded project is on the effects of non-rainfall water input on plant-soil water interactions in drylands with fieldwork in Namibia. Another project investigates the drought effects on forest water use (USDA-funded) with fieldwork in Indiana. The positions are available from Fall 2017, and will be supported through research and teaching assistantships that provide a competitive stipend, tuition remission and health insurance. The student(s) will be advised by Dr. Lixin Wang. Applicants must hold a BS degree in earth sciences, hydrology, soil science, environmental sciences or related disciplines, and have strong oral and written communication skills. Stable isotope background is preferred for both positions. The department of Earth Sciences has a wide variety of analytical facilities including LGR and Picarro water isotope analyzers, IRMS facility for 13C, 15N and 34S measurements, CN analyzer, and wet chemistry laboratories equipped for soil, water and plant analysis. To apply, please send a copy of your application materials (statement of interest, resume, unofficial transcripts, GRE score, TOEFL score if applicable, and contact information of three referees) to Dr. Lixin Wang (lxwang@iupui.edu). Posted: 1/16/17.

International Max Planck Research School: The IMPRS "The Exploration of Ecological Interactions with Molecular and Chemical Techniques" in Jena, Germany, invites applications for 4 PhD positions beginning in January 2017. The overarching research topic is the use of molecular, chemical and neuroethological techniques to experimentally explore ecological interactions under natural conditions. The main focus is on the relationship between plants, microbes and herbivores, and their environment, as well as the evolutionary and behavioral consequences of these interactions. We offer 6 exciting projects focusing on different organisms and approaches. We are looking for enthusiastic PhD students with strong interests in the above-described central topic. Applicants should have a firm background in one of the following fields: ecology, bioinformatics, analytical chemistry, entomology, neurobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, plant physiology and genetics. All our projects are highly integrative and require willingness to closely collaborate with researchers of different backgrounds. The Research School is a joint initiative of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Friedrich Schiller University, and the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology Jena. We offer state-of-the art equipment, an excellent research environment, supervision by a thesis committee and a structured training program including scientific courses, training in transferable skills and internal conferences. Successful candidates will receive a Max Planck support contract. There are no tuition fees and the working language is English. The application portal will close on August 19, 2016. For detailed information on the IMPRS, projects offered, application requirements, and to apply please visit http://imprs.ice.mpg.de/. Posted: 7/11/16.

Iowa State University: PhD graduate student assistantships in Ecosystem Ecology and Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling are available in the department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology. We invite highly motivated graduate students with interest in investigating cutting-edge ecological questions in a coupled human and natural system. Our research integrates ground/satellite observations into process-based ecosystem modeling framework to examine biogeochemical and hydrological cycles, land-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O), and land-coastal linkage at multiple scales from watershed, regional, continental to global in the context of multifactor global change (e.g., climate change, air pollution, land use and management, etc.). The student will work on one or two of these research areas by developing large-scale dataset, improving and calibrating terrestrial ecosystem/Land surface models, and analyzing simulation results. There are plenty of opportunities to work with a group of ecologists with different expertise, and socioeconomists. We expect that these new graduate students will join the lab in Fall 2017. The applicants should possess a degree in ecology/biology, hydrology, meteorology, geography, earth system science, forestry, agronomy, or soil science. Quantitative skills and experience in terrestrial ecosystem/land surface modeling, remote sensing, geospatial and/or statistical analysis are preferable. I will recruit students through the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Graduate Program and the Environmental Science Graduate Program (application due January 15, 2017). Please contact me in advance for more details. Interested applicants should send a cover letter (outlining their qualifications and research interest), resume, and copies of transcripts, TOFEL, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to Dr. Chaoqun Lu (clu@iastate.edu). Posted: 1/3/17.

Iowa State University: This PhD assistantship is associated with the STRIPS Project. The successful candidate will conduct research on bird and pollinator use of prairie reconstructions on commercial farms in Iowa and Missouri. Required qualifications: A strong academic background in a life science (e.g., biology, entomology, wildlife ecology), previous field research experience, ability to accurately identify Midwestern birds by sight and sound, demonstrated communication skills, interest in learning to identify pollinators with a focus on native bees, and ability to work in a collaborative environment. Preferred qualifications: An M.S. degree, ability to identify insects to the ordinary level, experience working in an agricultural setting, and demonstrated quantitative, scientific writing, and leadership skills. Start date: Negotiable between January and May 2017. To receive full consideration, submit applications by October 20, 2016. Email the following materials to Dr. Lisa Schulte Moore, lschulte@iastate.edu: (1) letter of interest stating professional goals, research interests, and qualifications for the position, (2) a resume, (3) transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial copies acceptable at this point), and (4) the names, affiliations, email addresses, and phone numbers of three references. A beginning Graduate Assistantship at ISU includes a stipend of $24k per year, plus tuition and benefits. Funding for this position has been secured through the US Fish and Wildlife Service and ISU. For further information contact: Dr. Lisa Schulte Moore, ISU Natural Resource Ecology & Management; 339 Science II, Ames, IA 50011; Phone: 515-294-7339; lschulte@iastate.edu; Dr. Matt O’Neal, ISU Entomology; 339 Science II, Ames, IA 50011; Phone: 515-294-8622; oneal@iastate.edu. Posted: 9/26/16.

Iowa State University: A graduate assistantship for a Ph.D. candidate is available in the Department of Entomology to conduct research with Aaron Gassmann. Research within this laboratory group is focused broadly in three areas: 1) the evolution of insecticide resistance, 2) the management of agricultural pest insects, and 3) interactions among plants, insects and entomopathogens. This assistantship will cover tuition, stipend and health insurance. If you are interested in this assistantship, please contact Aaron Gassmann (aaronjg@iastate.edu). Posted: 9/20/16.

Iowa State University: Steven Hall's lab in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology is seeking a PhD student with broad interests in soil organic matter dynamics in natural and agricultural ecosystems. We are seeking a student with interests in applying high-frequency stable isotope measurements in the lab and field to tackle cutting-edge questions in soil carbon cycling. There is a unique funding opportunity for a well-qualified student who would begin study in January 2017. We are seeking a creative and hard-working student with significant prior research experience. Prospective students should have a background in ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, microbial ecology, and/or soil science. Interested students should send a cover letter describing their interests, along with a CV, to stevenjh@iastate.edu. Students from backgrounds that are under-represented in higher education are highly encouraged to apply. Posted: 9/14/16.

James Cook University: I am seeking 2 highly motivated PhD students at James Cook University, Townsville to study: (1) the ecology of feral cats. The goal of this project is to determine the abundance and distribution of feral cats in the Queensland wet tropics region, and understand the ecological role of feral cats in relation to native prey species and introduced predators (dingoes). The main project will involve extensive camera trapping in the Townsville/Cairns region. Future work may include using GPS collars on feral cats to better understand their behavior and movement ecology. The scale of the project is somewhat large, and students will be encouraged to focus on a particular part of the project as well as develop their own studies within the larger project umbrella. Previous field work experience is required, and advanced analytical skills (computer programing, GIS, advanced stats experience) may be helpful. (2) ecology and population dynamics of chital deer The goal of this project is to understand the population ecology of an expanding chital deer population in Northern Queensland. This project will focus on determining how two key factors (predation and access to water) affect survivorship of chital deer, and use this information to understand population dynamics and potential control methods. Both: Project support will be provided, and students will be expected to apply for an APA (Australian Postgraduate Award) or other similar scholarship. Students will need a competitive resume (typically an honours degree, masters degree and/or scientific publications) for a successful scholarship application. Final applications are due 31, October 2016, but students should contact ben.hirsch@jcu.edu.au by 31, September to discuss their application. Posted: 9/14/16.

John Carroll University: The laboratory of Carl D. Anthony and Cari-Ann M. Hickerson anticipates one or two openings beginning in fall of 2017. Funded teaching assistantships include a full tuition waiver and a stipend of $11,600/year for 2 years. Drs. Anthony and Hickerson have two distinct research areas: 1) We are interested in how ecological factors such as mate choice, aggression, territoriality, and diet interact in the divergence of sympatric populations. We use polymorphic (striped, unstriped) populations of the Eastern Red-backed Salamander as a model system for this work. 2) We are also interested in how terrestrial amphibians interact with large invertebrates (e.g. centipedes, spiders, earthworms) in temperate forest floor food webs. If you are interested in applying, please contact Carl Anthony (canthony@jcu.edu) and Cari Hickerson (chickerson@jcu.edu) directly, and as soon as possible. Please include your interests, relevant experience and classes you have had, and your biology GPA in your email. Applications to the graduate school and for teaching assistantships are due 1 February 2017. More information can be found on the JCU Department of Biology webpage. Posted: 9/15/16.

Kansas State University: The Platt lab is recruiting PhD or MS graduate students interested in the evolution and population dynamics of bacterial pathogens. Our current research projects focus on the evolution and ecology of cooperative pathogenesis, the impact of quorum sensing and plasmid dynamics on bacterial competition, and interspecific interactions occurring within rhizosphere microbiomes. We integrate theoretical and quantitative ecology and evolution with microbial genetics using the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Funds are available for partial support of a Graduate Research Assistant working on an NSF-funded grant to develop a high-throughput platform to identify interactions within microbiomes. Our lab is in KSU’s Division of Biology, which houses the Ecological Genomics Institute and the Konza Prairie Biological Station. Information about graduate studies. We offer competitive research assistantships and fellowships that cover stipend, tuition, and medical insurance. If interested please contact Tom Platt (tgplatt@ksu.edu) with a brief statement of your research interests and experiences and your CV. Posted: 11/21/16.

Lincoln University: The Bio-Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University, New Zealand is offering a fully funded PhD studentship addressing the contemporary evolution of invasive weeds. This is a fantastic opportunity for a student wanting to bridge the disciplines of ecology and bioinformatics using cutting-edge molecular techniques with real world applications. The student will become a key member of a national research team undertaking an integrated project examining phenotypic variation, niche shifts and local adaptation in invasive plant species using globally-distributed weeds in the genus Rumex (dock) as a study system. More details. Deadline: 24 June 2017. Posted: 6/7/17.

Lincoln University: The Bio-Protection Research Centre is offering a fully funded PhD fellowship. These are truly fantastic opportunities for a student wanting to learn cutting-edge modelling techniques with real world applications. The student will become an integral member of a national research team undertaking an integrated project. The PhDs aim to develop network models for plant pests in the freshwater recreational user network in New Zealand and then use these models to evaluate opportunities for mitigation. This will be achieved by mapping the likely pathways on a map of the resources at risk and the suitability for pest establishment. Further details. The scholarships provide an annual stipend of NZD$28k a year tax-free, covers full university fees and includes up to approximately NZD$5k additional support a year towards operating expenses. The duration of the scholarship is three years. It is expected the successful candidates will be based at Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand. Applicants for this project should hold a first class or high 2A honours degree, or equivalent, in a relevant area, preferably with interest in spatial ecology, modelling and/or plant biosecurity. The position is open to applicants of any nationality, provided they are fluent in English, able to obtain a student visa and eligible for admission to the PhD program at Lincoln University. Applications should include evidence of qualifications and research experience, together with a curriculum vitae and contact details of two academic referees. Applications should be supported by a cover letter that states why the candidate is interested in the PhD (applicants are welcome to choose one or more) and how their qualifications would map onto the proposed research. Please email complete applications to philip.hulme@lincoln.ac.nz. Closing date for applications is 10th October 2016. Posted: 9/13/16.

Louisiana State University: A Ph.D. assistantship beginning Fall 2017 in the School of Renewable Natural Resources at LSU is available to work on the effects of drought and altered hydrology on floodplain forest (bottomland hardwood) regeneration. Dams, channel entrenchment, levees, and other geomorphic and hydrologic modifications to rivers in the southeast have influenced groundwater and surface water processes in floodplain forests of the southeast. These modifications, along with drought and stand conditions, have in some cases resulted in acute tree mortality and altered tree species composition. Floodplain forests are integral components of large-scale conservation efforts in the southeastern U.S. and an improved understanding of hydrologic and regeneration processes in these systems is needed to insure effective conservation and management. This study would be conducted on multiple wildlife management areas in east Texas; another Ph.D. student would focus on surface and subsurface hydrologic processes. In addition, the selected student would be part of a research group working on floodplain issues in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley. The ideal candidate will have an M.S. in wildlife, forestry, ecology, or related field. An understanding of wetlands and forest ecology are highly desired. Ability to work in interdisciplinary research groups is a must as is a strong-work ethic. Field conditions can be hot and humid, thus tolerance for adverse conditions is needed. To apply, please send a CV, GRE scores, copies of transcipts, and names and contact information for 3 references to Sammy King at sking16@lsu.edu. Candidates will be selected by 15 May. Posted: 5/1/17.

Louisiana State University: The coastal wetlands of the Gulf of Mexico are important habitat for waterbirds, alligators, and other wetland-dependent wildlife. The ability of these marshes to keep up with sea-level rise is a critical focal area for current research and hinges on the balance between sea level rise, below ground plant production and decomposition, and deep subsidence. Wetland management practices (e.g., fire, drawdowns, herbicides) for waterfowl and other wildlife, affect plant production and decomposition processes and thus affects the ability of the marshes to keep up with sea level rise. We are seeking a Ph.D. student to investigate how coastal wetland management practices influence the ability of coastal marshes to keep up with sea level rise and to identify alternative management practices that can provide benefits to target wildlife while sustaining marshes over the long-term. The student must possess an M.S. degree in biology, plant ecology, wetlands, wildlife or related field. Ideally the student will have experience in wetland ecology and management. Field experience is also a plus. The student will work with several state and federal agencies and will be co-advised by Drs. Sammy King (sking16@lsu.edu) and Andy Nyman (jnyman@lsu.edu). Please send a statement of interest that includes career goals, CV, copies of transcripts, and names and contact information for 3 references to sking16@lsu.edu. Application review will begin on 15 May. Posted: 5/1/17.

Louisiana State University: M.S. Graduate Research Assistantship Available Immediately - LSU Department of Entomology. For agroecosystems to be sustainable, they must be both productive and protective. Agroecosystems must provide sufficient natural enemy diversity to help regulate pest populations. However, though insecticides are often a necessary tactic used to control insect pest populations, they disrupt the integrity of agroecosystems. We seek a highly motivated M.S. student to evaluate the effects of current insecticides meant to control stink bugs on soybean looper and natural enemies. The student will test whether insecticides cause pest resurgence and secondary pests by reducing natural enemies. Over the course of the project, the student will create and validate best management practices that integrate insecticides to control pests while preserving natural enemies and ecological partnerships. The successful student will have the opportunity to work in diverse agricultural production systems throughout Louisiana and will be expected to publish both peer-reviewed journal articles and extension publications. The student will gain valuable experience in southern field crop production, from planting to harvest, including pest scouting. This is also an exciting opportunity to gain valuable experience in systems level ecological management. A full stipend including tuition waiver for a full three years is available immediately. Requirements: A B.S. degree in Life Sciences and a valid driver’s license. Interested students should send a letter of interest including future research and professional goals and a CV including a list of references to Dr. Jeff Davis at jeffdavis@agcenter.lsu.edu. Posted: 3/7/17.

Louisiana State University: I am seeking for a Ph.D. student to participate in a research on sediment transport, channel morphology, and deltaic development of the lower Mississippi River. The research involves intensive quantitative and geospatial analysis and modeling to understand how future sea level rise will affect sedimentation and channel dynamics in the backwater zone of large alluvial rivers such as the lower Mississippi River. Applicants should have an MS degree in earth science, hydrology, physical geography, or a closely related field, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GRE of 300 (V+Q). Previous experience in river studies with GIS/Remote Sensing techniques are highly desirable. Graduate student stipend will be $22k plus full tuition waiver for a period of 2 years, with the potential to extend for another 2 years contingent upon funding availability and performance. Interested candidates should send an email describing their past experience and their motivation for pursuing a graduate degree, along with a resume, unofficial college transcripts, GRE scores, and the names and contact information for 3 references to yjxu@lsu.edu. Missing any of the above documents will not be considered. Start date is expected to be in the summer or fall semester of 2017. Y. Jun Xu, School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. Posted: 12/24/16.

Lund University: Two four year PhD positions with full salary and social benefits are available with Dr Daniel Metcalfe at Lund University, Sweden. Both positions will work within an exciting new international project funded by a recent ERC consolidator grant examining the causes and consequences of invertebrate herbivory in forests worldwide. 1) The first position entails extensive fieldwork at field sites around the world to the measure the biogeochemical consequences of herbivory. 2) The second position entails laboratory manipulations of herbivore deposits in soil mesocosms to assess the potential impacts of herbivory on soil processes under climate change. For further details of the positions, and to apply, visit the links above. The application deadline is 20th July 2017, the position start date is September 2017 but can be negotiated. We encourage applications from highly motivated and independent young scientists particularly with experience of ecological fieldwork and of biochemistry/microbiology laboratory work. Posted: 5/23/17.

Macquarie University: 4 PhD positions in Behavioural and Physiological Ecology, Sydney, Australia. We are pleased to announce multiple opportunities available for a start from mid to late 2017. 1: Adapting to a foreign climate: the reproductive ecology of the house sparrow in Australia. The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) was introduced into Australia in the 1860’s and has since become well established across a broad range of climates in both countries. This project will take advantage of this ‘experimental’ introduction to focus on behavioural and physiological adaptations to different climates through a field-based comparative approach. This research will complement our existing work on related questions in endemic Australian species and will provide insight into the capacity of avian species to adapt to changing climates. This project will involve periods of field-work in Broken Hill, Armidale and Hobart in Australia, along with a range of behavioural, molecular and physiological assays. The project will involve collaboration with other groups in Australia and the US. 2: The challenge of growing in a hot climate (in the zebra finch). In recent years we have characterised the very hot conditions in which zebra finches are raised (with nests often reaching temperatures over 40 degrees Celsius, as well as identifying adverse effects of these conditions on embryonic development, offspring growth, and adult sperm. This project is supported by an ARC funded project and will investigate the adaptations that this iconic and well-studied species has to deal with the extreme climate in which it lives. The project will take a variety of approaches including behavioural work, and assays of metabolism and physiology, and combine fieldwork and laboratory work. The project will be run in collaboration with Dr Christine Cooper (Curtin University, Western Australia), Prof. Pierre Deviche (Arizona State University, US), and Prof. Pat Monaghan (Glasgow, UK). 3: Social structuring and life-history in free-ranging domestic sheep. In this project we will examine the importance of social structure and collective intelligence to life-history trade-offs and productivity in domestic sheep in the rangelands of Australia. The project will use tools from social network theory and spatial ecology to characterise individual and group behaviour and investigate their effect on individual quality and productivity (lambs and wool) in this challenging, but economically important part of Australia. The project will be based at Fowlers Gap (near Broken Hill in the arid zone) and require field work and well-developed analytical skills. This work will be run in collaboration with partners in the pastoral industry and be jointly supervised by Dr Stephan Leu (also at Macquarie University). 4: Parasite transmission dynamics in an Australian lizard. This project will investigate the relationship between host spatial and social behaviour and bacterial transmission. It combines social network theory, spatial ecology and wildlife epidemiology to determine how different bacterial strains are transmitted through the population and how individual behaviour and consequently population social structure changes as a function of infection status. The project combines the analysis of a very comprehensive (already collected) dataset with scope for the student to develop his/her own ideas and conduct fieldwork. The student should be interested in social networks and disease modelling and have strong analytical skills. This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Stephan Leu and A/Prof Martin Whiting (both at Macquarie University). We also have strong relationships with disease modelling colleagues in the US. A Macquarie University Excellence in Research Scholarship has already been assigned to one of these projects, but there are other scholarship opportunities available to suitably competitive candidates. International candidates are welcome to apply for any of the projects listed above. The 2014 MQRES full-time stipend rate is $26k pa tax exempt for 3 years (indexed annually). In addition to external grant support for projects, there is additional internal funding (up to $17k) available to cover direct research expenses and conference travel. Applicants should ideally have a research-based MSc in a related discipline (with a minimum 50% research component), and additional relevant research experience, qualifications, and details of awards or prizes. For projects 1, 2, and 4 an ability to work in remote and harsh conditions as well as experience in capturing and handling animals is desirable. A driving licence is required for all projects. Applications should include 1) your CV, 2) a brief statement of your reasons for applying (max. 500 words) and the project you are applying to work on, 3) contact details of two academic referees, 4) your nationality (for scholarship eligibility purposes). Applications should be submitted electronically as a single PDF file. Applications for these positions (and any initial enquiries) should be emailed by 7th April 2017 to: simon.griffith@mq.edu.au Prof. Simon Griffith, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia. Posted: 3/27/17.

Max Planck Institute for Ornithology: The International Max Planck Research School for Organismal Biology is a joint cooperation between the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and the Department of Biology at the University of Konstanz. The at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen invites applications for 2 PhD positions (f/m), one on Alternative Reproductive Tactics in Birds: how to overcome a Ruff handicap with the research group Clemens Küpper, one on Heritability and microevolution of hormonal traits with the research group Evolutionary Physiology headed by Prof. Michaela Hau. Please apply exclusively on our online application portal on no later than Jan 15, 2017. Posted: 11/17/16.

Memorial University of Newfoundland: We are seeking a highly motivated student to conduct research on Newfoundland and Labrador northern shrimp fisheries. The student will pursue a M.Sc. degree in Fisheries Science at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John’s, starting in Fall 2017. The student will be supervised by Dr. Arnault Le Bris at the Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research and work on the spatiotemporal variability in northern shrimp life history traits. Student will collaborate with the researchers from Fisheries and Oceans Canada and with the industry to collect and analyse data. The project involves field work aboard large fishing vessels, laboratory work, and computer programming. Strong statistical and programming skills, including knowledge of R programming language are required. At sea experienced is a plus. Interested applicants should send a brief cover letter, CV, copies of transcripts and contact information for 2 references to Dr. Arnault Le Bris (arnault.lebris@mi.mun.ca). Posted: 5/23/17.

Memorial University of Newfoundland: I invite applicants for M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies in mathematical biology. Possible research topics include the ecology and evolution of infectious disease, animal movement models, and population biology in changing environments. A competitive salary will be offered with additional funding available for conference travel. Interdisciplinary training in biology, mathematics and/or experience in computer programming is ideal, but only proficiency in one of these areas is necessary where there is an interest to develop further skills in the other areas. Applicants should email Dr. Amy Hurford (ahurford@mun.ca). This email should include: (i) 1-2 paragraphs describing your research interests and any relevant past experience, (ii) your CV, and (iii) unofficial transcripts pertaining to your previous or ongoing studies (if possible). I will consider applications as they are received. For full consideration applicants should indicate their interest before November 15, 2016. Applicants should be able to begin their studies in May or September, 2017. Posted: 10/27/16.

Michigan State University: The Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences and Center for Global Change and Earth Observation (CGCEO) are pleased to announce at least two graduate student positions in Socioecological carbon production in managed agricultural-forest landscapes. Successful candidates will possess and demonstrate relevant interest and skills in one or more of the following topics: (1) Bottom-up scaling of landscape C fluxes from eddy covariance measurements; (2) Top-down estimates of C fluxes from a land surface model (the Community Land Model); (3) land cover remote sensing across multiple sensors; (4) socioecological analysis of managed landscapes including life cycle analysis and structural equation modeling. Successful applicants will play a significant role in research funded by the NASA Carbon Cycle Science program. This work focuses on understanding the quantitative contributions of land cover change, specific management practices, and climate changes to the social and physical C fluxes of managed ecosystems, with an initial focus on the Kalamazoo River watershed in Michigan. Strong candidates will have experience with collaborative interdisciplinary work. If you have questions about these positions please contact Dr. Jiquan Chen (jqchen@msu.edu) and/or Dr. Kyla Dahlin (kdahlin@msu.edu). For more information about our groups check out the LEES Lab and the ERSAM Lab webpages. Students will be expected to produce compelling scientific articles for publication in peer-reviewed journals. These PhD in Geography positions are fully funded for three years. This includes an annual stipend plus tuition and fees and involves collaboration with researchers at MSU in the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, the CGCEO, and the Kellogg Biological Station. The ideal candidates should be highly motivated individuals with strong interests in one or more of the above topics. The successful applicants will have the opportunity to present the results of their dissertation project at annual meetings and scientific conferences. Preferred qualifications: MSc. degree in Geography, Ecology, or a related field. Application deadline is February 1, 2017 (or until position is filled). Starting date: Fall 2017 (Classes start on August 30, 2017). See requirements and applying to the Geography program and the most recent Graduate Handbook (pdf). Posted: 1/10/17.

Michigan State University: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University invites applications for the position of Doctoral Research Assistant. The intent of this position is to investigate movement and dispersal of white-tailed deer within the Michigan Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) management zone. CWD was first observed in Michigan in 2015, and the distribution of the disease appears to be localized to an area just north of the MSU campus. This field-based project will involve three years of deer capture and radio-collaring, intensive GPS monitoring of deer movement, and statistical modeling to analyze deer movement behavior and population dynamics. The Doctoral Research Assistant will work as part of a team of doctoral students, postdoctoral research associates, faculty, and biologists with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The project has five years of financial support. Program Support: The MSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife is one of the largest programs of its kind, with 45 core faculty. The Department hosts the Boone and Crockett Quantitative Wildlife Center, whose mission is to promote wildlife conservation by applying mathematics, statistics, and computer modeling to major challenges facing wildlife management and conservation policy. Qualifications: Applicants must have a Master’s Degree in wildlife ecology or a related field, an aptitude for quantitative analysis, and excellent communication skills. Prior experience with animal capture and radiotelemetry is strongly preferred. The applicant must have the ability to work extended hours in adverse field conditions (e.g. snow, wind) during the capture season. Preference will be given to candidates with a record of experience working with government wildlife agencies. Salary and Start Date: $22k, tuition, and health benefits. Applications: Submit applications to the Departmental Research Administrator, Dr. Rose Stewart (stewa684@msu.edu), with the subject line “Deer Movement and CWD”. A single PDF file should be submitted, including: a letter of intent, CV, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, GRE scores, and a list of three references. Review of applications will begin February 1, 2017. Posted: 1/8/17.

Michigan State University: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University invites applications for the position of Doctoral Research Assistant. The intent of this position is to understand factors influencing transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer. The project will draw on field data from GPS-collared deer and deer removal efforts to evaluate risk of disease spread and efficacy of management actions to control CWD on Michigan landscapes. The Doctoral Research Assistant will work as part of a team of doctoral students, postdoctoral research associates, faculty, and biologists with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The project has five years of financial support. Program Support: The MSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife is one of the largest programs of its kind, with 45 core faculty. The Department hosts the Boone and Crockett Quantitative Wildlife Center, whose mission is to promote wildlife conservation by applying mathematics, statistics, and computer modeling to major challenges facing wildlife management and conservation policy. Qualifications: Applicants must have a Master’s Degree in wildlife ecology or a related field, a strong aptitude for quantitative analysis and modeling, and excellent communication skills. Preference will be given to candidates with a record of experience working with government wildlife agencies. Salary and Start Date: $22k, tuition, and health benefits. Applications: Submit applications to the Departmental Research Administrator, Dr. Rose Stewart (stewa684@msu.edu), with the subject line “CWD Modeling in Deer”. A single PDF file should be submitted, including: a letter of intent, CV, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, GRE scores, and a list of three references. Review of applications will begin February 1, 2017. Posted: 1/8/17.

Michigan State University: The Human Dimensions of Forestry Lab is accepting applications for an MS and a PhD assistantship position to start August 2017. Applicants should be self-motivated and also capable of working as part of a team. The ideal applicant will have experience and interest in qualitative and quantitative social science, as well an interest in modeling. Additional skills for the PhD position include statistical analysis, technical writing, and basic GIS. The projects associated with these positions are flexible, but will likely focus on 1) The effect of urban forests, green space, and agriculture on public health outcomes; 2) The role of risk and psychological distance in decision making and natural resource management; and 3) The use of ecological momentary assessments to understand environmental behavior. The graduate student can and will develop a project and associated research questions tailored to their interests and intended career path. These positions will be based in the Department of Forestry, but there are opportunities for co-advising in Fish & Wildlife, Plant Soil and Microbial Science, or the Environmental Science and Policy Program depending upon funding availability and the student’s background. The positions will be supported with a stipend (~$24k/year), and paid tuition/benefits. There are additional fellowship opportunities for graduate students at MSU, so please apply to the University’s graduate school by December 1, 2016 to be competitive for these fellowships. To apply for the assistantship, please submit (1) a cover letter explaining your interest in the position, your qualifications, and any specific research areas you hope to pursue at Michigan State, and (2) a CV. Please be sure to include your GPA (undergraduate and graduate), GRE scores (if completed), and contact information for references somewhere within your CV/Resume. Documents should be submitted via email to Dr. Emily Huff at ehuff@msu.edu as a single PDF file with the subject heading “Graduate Assistantship Application.” Applications must be received by November 1, 2016 to receive full consideration. Posted: 10/10/16.

Michigan State University: The Wetzel Lab is accepting applications from prospective PhD and MS students interested in studying how biological diversity or environmental variability influences insects and their interactions with plants and predators. The lab uses field experiments and quantitative tools to address fundamental ecological questions that are relevant to agricultural sustainability or climate change. There are currently two main lines of inquiry in the lab: 1) How does trait diversity within and among plant species influence insect herbivores and predators? We are especially focused on diversity in plant chemistry among individuals within a population. 2) How does temperature variability influence interactions among plants, insect herbivores, and predators? We are interested in understanding how the increased frequency of high temperature events associated with climate change is changing the ecology of plants and insects. I am interested in students who would like to collaborate with me on these projects as well as students who would like to develop novel projects related to the ecology of plants and insects in a variable world. Please see http://wetzellab.com for more information. I plan to take students both through the Department of Entomology and the Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program. Qualifications: Applications should have a bachelor’s degree in ecology, biology, entomology, environmental science, or related field. Preference will be given to applicants with research experience, a broad understanding of ecological principles, and knowledge of plant-insect interactions. Applicants should have strong quantitative skills or an interest in learning them. Strong written and oral communication skills are essential. A MS is not necessary for PhD applicants, but it could be helpful. The Wetzel Lab strives to be a safe space for diversity in STEM. Funding: Students in the lab receive a generous stipend, a tuition waiver, and a travel budget. This financial support comes through research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and university fellowships. Students are also encouraged to seek external fellowships through the NSF, USDA, and other sources. MSU is an exciting place to study plant-insect ecology. The university has a large and dynamic community of scientists working on cutting-edge questions about plants and insects in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Potential collaborators and colleagues can be found in the departments of Entomology, Plant Biology, and Integrative Biology, and across the Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program. The university has an extensive greenhouse facility and access to field sites on campus and at the MSU Kellogg Biological Station nearby. Prospective students should read the lab webpage ( and ) and email me, William Wetzel (wcwetzel@msu.edu) with the following: 0) "Prospective student” in subject line of email 1) Brief cover letter describing research interests and career goals 2) CV 3) Unofficial transcripts 4) Sample of scientific writing (e.g., published paper, manuscript in preparation, MS or undergraduate thesis, research paper or essay from a class) 5) Names and email addresses for 3 references Applicants who email me by November 1st will be given preference. This will allow time for us to discuss potential projects before applications are due to the graduate school on December 1st. I will schedule informal Skype interviews with the best candidates to discuss potential projects in more detail. Posted: 9/22/16.

Michigan State University: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife invites applications for the position of Doctoral Research Assistant. The intent of this position is to investigate the risk of spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), as well as design new, cost-effective surveillance and management programs in Michigan. The project will draw on statistical modeling to estimate and map risks, and incorporate characteristics of deer movement behavior and population dynamics to tailor surveillance and management efforts to Michigan landscapes. CWD was first observed in Michigan in 2015, and the distribution of the disease appears to be localized. The Doctoral Research Assistant will work as part of a team of doctoral students, postdoctoral research associates, faculty, and biologists with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The project has five years of financial support. The Department is one of the largest programs of its kind, with 45 core faculty. The Department hosts the Boone and Crockett Quantitative Wildlife Center, whose mission is to promote wildlife conservation by applying mathematics, statistics, and computer modeling to major challenges facing wildlife management and conservation policy. Qualifications: Applicants must have a Master’s Degree in wildlife ecology or a related field, an aptitude for quantitative analysis, and excellent communication skills. Preference will be given to candidates with a record of experience working with government conservation agencies. Salary and Start Date: $22k, tuition, and health benefits. Funding will be available January 1, 2017. Submit applications to the Departmental Research Administrator, Dr. Rose Stewart (stewa684@msu.edu). Applications must include: a letter of intent, resume or CV, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, GRE scores, and a list of three references. Review will begin November 1, 2016. Posted: 9/14/16.

Michigan State University: Up to two PhD student positions are available for research addressing the role of fire on ecosystem processes in fire-prone temperate conifer forests and/or barrens ecosystems, to begin in Fall 2017 (data collection may begin in Summer 2017). The student(s) will be responsible investigating soil and vegetation response to wildfire and/or prescribed fire, and will be expected to develop independent research questions related to the overall project objectives. We seek applicants with a high level of enthusiasm for research that includes field measurements as well as laboratory procedures that together contribute to understanding ecosystem processes and responses to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Strong written, verbal and computation skills are essential. Prior experience participating in or leading field research or monitoring projects is strongly desired. Successful applicants will be expected to work independently as well as collaboratively as an active member of a research group, conduct field work in variable weather conditions, and perform detailed laboratory analyses with a high level of precision. The student will be advised by Dr. Jessica Miesel and will have opportunity for close communication with (and potential co-advisorship by) Forest Service researchers. The student will be based in East Lansing, MI during the academic year, with extended summer travel to perform fieldwork in the northern Lake States region and/or California. To express interest, please email as a SINGLE PDF: (1) a statement of research interests/background and professional goals, (2) a CV, (3) a list of 3-4 professional references (names and contact information), (4) GRE scores, (5) unofficial transcripts, and (6) TOEFL scores (international students only) to Dr. Jessica Miesel at mieselje@msu.edu. Funding is available for outstanding applicants. For full consideration (and after discussing interests with Dr. Miesel), interested students should apply to the MSU Graduate School before December 1. Successful applicants will be housed in the Department of Forestry, with opportunity to participate in MSU’s interdisciplinary Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior program and/or the Environmental Science & Policy Program. Posted: 8/30/16.

Michigan Technological University: We seek two MS students with interests in aquatic ecology, limnology and ecotoxicology to pursue research projects at Michigan Technological University. Research topics include 1) The importance of overwintering on yellow perch proximate composition, persistent organic pollutant bioaccumulation and stable isotope (d13C & d15N) ecology and 2) Mapping water quality metrics in a north temperate dimictic lake over an annual growing season. Each of these projects represent a combination of laboratory and field work with sampling efforts focused in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula region. Preferred candidates will have strong backgrounds in aquatic ecology and limnology in addition to good lab techniques associated with working in a chemistry lab environment. Additional experience and background in ecotoxicology, field work, and familiarity with operating small watercraft are beneficial, however, these skills are not essential to apply. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Dr. Gord Paterson (gpaterso@mtu.edu) for specific project details and application instructions. Both of these positions are supported by graduate teaching assistantships in the Biological Sciences Department. We anticipate potential candidates to officially apply to enroll for the fall semester, starting August 2017. Posted: 2/9/17.

Michigan Technological University: The silviculture and applied forest ecology, and forest insect ecology labs are seeking a PhD student interested in the ecology and management of hardwood forests affected by beech bark disease (BBD) in northern Michigan, to start in the Spring of 2017. Research in our labs focuses on the inter-relationships among forest composition and structure, ecological processes, forest health, and the full range of ecosystem services across scales from individual trees, to stands and landscapes. The successful applicant will be primarily engaged on a project funded by the National Park Service investigating the potential for reintroducing American beech to two national lakeshores in Michigan that have been impacted by BBD. Successful applicants will be expected to collaborate as an active member of a research group, conduct fieldwork in variable weather conditions, be comfortable taking initiative and working independently, and perform detailed statistical analyses. Strong written and verbal communication, and computational skills are required. Prior experience participating in or leading field research is desired. A master’s degree or work experience in a related field is an advantage. Michigan Tech’s School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science is particularly well known for its excellence in the fields of forestry, applied ecology, forest molecular genetics, and wildlife management. We currently employ 23 tenure-track faculty, 10 research faculty, 23 research professionals, and 11 administrative/support professionals and enroll 155 undergraduate and 75 graduate students. The successful applicant will be jointly supervised by Dr. Andrew Storer and Dr. Yvette Dickinson. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Yvette Dickinson at yldickin@mtu.edu. Please include a CV, GPA, GRE scores (if available) and a written statement describing your research interests and previous research experience. Applicants should also initiate a free graduate school application. Review of applications will begin 1st December 2016. Posted: 10/27/16.

Mississippi State University: We are seeking to immediately fill a PhD Research Assistantship to understand resource selection of elk and brown bears on Afognak Island, Alaska. Afognak Island contains one of the few remaining pure-strain herds of Roosevelt elk in North America. The prospective student has the chance to join a productive team and broader group of collaborators to understand the ecology of these species in relation to forest management. Field research will take place on Afognak and Raspberry Islands in the Kodiak Archipelago, Alaska, and will involve close collaboration with state and tribal agencies. The student will be based in the Carnivore Ecology Laboratory within the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture. Salary is $23,500/year with tuition and health insurance provided. Start Date is 1 June 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter. Qualifications: MS degree in wildlife biology, ecology, or related field. Preference will be given to those with field experience with large mammals in remote areas. Strong GIS and spatial modeling skills in addition to knowledge of R and WinBUGS are preferred. Priority will be given to applicants with advanced writing skills as evidenced by recent peer-reviewed publications. To apply, please send a single PDF file with the subject line “Elk-Brown Bear PhD Assistantship” containing (1) a cover letter outlining your interests, experience, and contact information, (2) a resume or CV, (3) GRE scores, (4) undergraduate and graduate transcripts (unofficial), and (5) contact information for 3 professional references. Send applications to Jerry Belant (j.belant@msstate.edu). Posted: 3/6/17.

Mississippi State University: A masters level research assistantship is available in the Forest Ecophysiology lab of Dr. Heidi Renninger in the Department of Forestry at Mississippi State University starting August, 2017. Broadly, my lab seeks to understand how the physical environment affects plant physiological functioning in terms of productivity and water use and how environmental change will alter plant and ecosystem function in the future. Specific research projects are open and could include (but are not limited to) any of the following topics: physiological functioning of bottomland hardwood tree species in terms of the ecosystem services they provide, physiological comparison of water use in upland hardwood species in relation to mesophication and flammability of the ecosystem, physiology of poplar biofuel crops, or structure/function relationships in xylem and phloem across plant types. This two year assistantship provides financial support including a stipend, tuition waiver and health insurance. More information about the graduate school. To learn more about the position, please contact Heidi Renninger at Heidi.Renninger@msstate.edu. Interested students should submit a letter of interest that provides information on the student’s background, research interests and goals for graduate school as well as a resume/CV to Dr. Renninger. Review of applications will begin on Feb. 20th. Posted: 2/9/17.

Mississippi State University: I am seeking a highly motivated MS student to join the Forest Hydrology and Soils Lab in the College of Forest Resources. The student will conduct research in the discipline of forest hydrology with specific attention to the interface between the atmospheric environment and the forest canopy in a simulated bark beetle mortality experiment. The student will participate in extensive field research at the nearby John W. Starr Memorial Forest in addition to laboratory work in the Forest Hydrology and Soils Lab on campus. The prospective student should possess enthusiasm for field work, strong analytical and communication skills, and attention to detail. The desired start date is June 2017, but August 2017 will also be considered. Financial support is available for two years, including a stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance. If interested, please contact Dr. Courtney Siegert at courtney.siegert@msstate.edu and provide (1) a cover letter discussing interest in the research and applicable background experience; (2) a CV; and (3) unofficial transcripts and/or GREs. Review of applications will begin February 1, 2017. Details on the full application process. Posted: 1/7/17.

Mississippi State University: I am currently seeking 3 graduate students at the M.S. (2) and PhD level for a funded research project on coastal wetlands in Puerto Rico. Students interested in avian population and community ecology, movement ecology and species-habitat modeling are encouraged to apply. This project will address ecological and management questions on conservation and restoration of coastal wetland ecosystems in tropical oceanic islands at local, island and regional scales. Master’s students will address wetland bird community and nesting ecology. Results will highlight wetland restoration needs and habitat conditions for wetlands birds. Doctoral student will address movements, resource selection and survival of the West Indian Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna arborea) using GPS telemetry. Results will highlight the functional role of this species as indicator of coastal wetlands at multiple spatial scales. The Master's program in Wildlife Ecology will provide 3-years of graduate research assistantship funding, including tuition and insurance. PhD program will provide up to 4 years of support in the form of graduate research assistantship with full tuition and insurance covered. Stipend amounts are competitive on a national level. More information: Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Aquaculture. Candidates interested in applying for either MS or PhD positions are encouraged to email Dr. Francisco J. Vilella (fv1@msstate.edu, fvilella@usgs.gov) with the following information: 1) an unofficial transcript (undergraduate and/or MS, as appropriate), 2) curriculum vitae including contact information for 3 professional references, and 3) a brief personal statement describing research and career goals, and how this degree would help the student achieve these goals. Posted: 10/13/16.

Monash University: Two fully-funded PhD stipends are available to students interested in working on the evolutionary ecology of marine heterotrophs in the Centre for Geometric Biology. Prof Dustin Marshall is the director of the Centre and Prof Craig White is deputy-director, however the specifics of the project and the most appropriate supervisors from the CGB will depend on the interests of the successful students and collaboration between student and supervisor. The stipends include all course fees plus ~$26,288 AUD per annum tax-free with no teaching requirements for 3.5 years (the length of a PhD in Australia). Domestic students (Australian and New Zealand) will be eligible for ‘top up funding’ to a total stipend of $30k. Guaranteed funding of project costs and research support, including the costs of attending at least one conference per year, is included. Project start dates can be any time in 2017. To be eligible, applicants must have completed at least one year of post-graduate research in ecology and/or evolution. Successful applicants will hold a BSc H1 or equivalent (first class honours degree) and preference will be given to those with strong quantitative skills and publications in international journals. Any offers made by the CGB are subject to acceptance by Monash University. Interested students should send a CV, brief statement of interests and contact details of two referees to Liz.Morris@monash.edu Application closing date January 22nd 2017. Posted: 1/3/17.

Montana State University: The Priscu Research Group is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student to work on the aquatic systems in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo LTER project. This six-year interdisciplinary project extends 24 years of previous data collection on the permanently ice-covered lakes of the region and will focus on biogeochemical responses to changes in landscape connectivity and climate. The successful applicant will be expected to interact with technicians, graduate students and PI’s in Antarctic fieldwork. The successful applicant must also pass the medical and dental exams required by NSF for Antarctic deployment. A Master’s degree in ecosystem modeling, aquatic biogeochemistry, or microbial ecology is desirable. Interested students should contact Amy Chiuchiolo (achiuchiolo@montana.edu) and include a brief statement of interest and CV. Posted: 5/12/17.

Montana State University: We are seeking a Master’s student to work on a multi-agency funded project aimed at understanding the role of juniper encroachment on riparian hydrology. The student will be part of Dr. Jia Hu’s Plant Ecophysiology Lab, in the Ecology Department. The student will work on topics related to plant ecophysiology, such as measuring transpiration rates among different plant species, partitioning water use among plant species, and characterizing age classes of juniper trees. Other disciplines integrated into this project include dendrochronology and hydrology. We seek an enthusiastic student who is comfortable working long hours both in the field (often under inclement weather), as well as in the lab. Preferred BA/BS degrees in Biological Sciences, Ecology, Environmental Sciences, or Forestry. Students who have prior experience working with sap flow sensors (or have an interest in learning about electronics and data-logger programming) are encouraged to apply. Applicants for this position should have a strong academic record and demonstrate the ability to work independently.The position is funded for two and a half years, with three academic semesters of a TA, two academic semesters of a RA, and three summers of RA. Tuition, fees, and health insurance are also included. Position will start June 1, 2017, with some flexibility in the start date. If interested, send a CV and a short statement of interest in the position. Please send all inquiries to Dr. Jia Hu and jia.hu02@montana.edu. Posted: 1/5/17.

Montana State University: Interested in joining an interdisciplinary team examining the water-energy-food nexus as a graduate scholar? Our interdisciplinary consortium at Montana State University seeks six motivated graduate students to join our research team as graduate scholars to contribute to a new NSF-funded project on interactions among food, water, and energy systems. Specifically, our project seeks to understand the social, economic, political and environmental implications of proposed climate solutions in the Upper Missouri River Basin. Graduate scholar opportunities are available in the following departments and programs with the following associated faculty: 1. Land Resources & Environmental Sciences (Ecology and Environmental Sciences PhD Program) with Professors Jack Brookshire, Perry Miller, Paul Stoy and (NASA) Ben Poulter (three opportunities), 2. Earth Sciences (Geography PhD Program) with Dr. Julia Haggerty and the Resources & Communities Research Group, 3. Health & Human Development (Sustainable Food Systems Masters Program) with Professor Selena Ahmed of the MSU Food and Health Lab, 4. Chemical & Biological Engineering (PhD Program) with Professor Brent Peyton. Beyond their disciplinary homes and the project cohort, graduate scholars will have the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues at NASA, the University of South Dakota, the University of Wyoming, regional Tribal Colleges, industry partners, and across Montana State University including Extended University and Extension. Four years of stipend support and tuition waivers are available for five Ph.D students, and two years of stipend support and tuition waivers are available for one MS student. We seek enthusiastic students with a broad range of skills, experiences, and backgrounds in the natural and social sciences interested in one or more of the following: i) measuring and modeling nitrogen transport in terrestrial ecosystems including cropping systems, ii) the production and application of biofertilizers, iii) the climate consequences of land management, iv) human dimensions of rural land use change and/or the land use-energy policy nexus, and v) food security. MSU values diverse perspectives and is committed to supporting an inclusive and culturally diverse campus. We hope to attract applicants from diverse backgrounds and others who can foster an inclusive learning environment. If you are interested in applying, please send a CV or resume, contact information for three references, and a one-page personal statement describing your scientific interests and career objectives by December 15, 2016 in a single document to Dr. Paul Stoy at paul.stoy@montana.edu. We encourage you to visit the websites of the individual departments, programs, and faculty to learn more before applying. Outstanding candidates will then be invited to apply to individual departments at Montana State University. Start dates are flexible between January 1 and August 28, 2017. Please do not hesitate to write individual faculty with requests for additional information, and please visit jobs.montana.edu for more information about Montana State University and Bozeman, MT. Montana State University is an equal opportunity employer. Posted: 11/17/16.

Montclair State University: PhD student opportunities are available in the combined labs of Jennifer Krumins and Eric Forgoston for students interested in empirical and theoretical studies of ecosystem function and the soil micro-food web. The specific research area may be somewhat flexible depending on the interest and qualifications of the student. Experience in one or more of the following areas is necessary: soil community ecology, microbial ecology, biogeochemistry and/or applied mathematics. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Jennifer Krumins (kruminsj@mail.montclair.edu) to discuss their interests before applying. With correspondence, please plan to provide: 1) a brief description of your research interests, 2) a resume/CV highlighting any relevant coursework and experience, and 3) unofficial transcripts. Potential Ph.D. students will be directed to apply to the MSU Doctoral Program in Environmental Management. The application deadline is February 15, 2017 to be fully considered for funding. Both the Krumins and Forgoston labs are grant supported, and graduate assistantships are available through the university. MSU is a public research university in New Jersey within the New York Metropolitan region that supports an exceptionally diverse population of students and faculty. The Doctoral Program in Environmental Management is characterized by interdisciplinary research with broad goals to address environmental issues that impact sustainability. The program strives to prepare scientists who are fully primed to continue with creative, cutting-edge scientific discoveries that are grounded in basic science and mathematics. Posted: 12/13/16.

Murray State University: Graduate Research Assistant (MS) in Aquatic Ecology, Watershed Studies Institute and Department of Biological Sciences. One full-time position to begin late May 2017. Qualifications: B.S. in biology, ecology, or related discipline. Previous experience with field experiments, stream/riparian ecosystems, amphibians, fish, and/or stream invertebrate ecology highly desirable. Responsibilities: To conduct research on trophic interactions in stream and riparian food webs while completing a M.S. degree in Watershed Science. This project is fully funded, including travel to field sites in Colorado. Salary: $16,500 per year. Other benefits include housing at the Hancock Biological Station (Murray, KY) during the academic year and High Lonesome Ranch (De Beque, CO) during summers. To Apply: Email a letter of application, curriculum vitae including undergraduate GPA and GRE scores, and the names and email addresses of three references to Dr. Howard Whiteman (hwhiteman@murraystate.edu). Deadline: February 15, 2017. Posted: 10/12/16, revised: 1/31/17.

Murray State University: MS Assistantship: Ecology of Xerohydric Flatwoods in KY. Graduate research assistantship available toward a MS in Watershed Science through the Watershed Studies Institute (WSI) with Paul Gagnon. Position examines ecological and edaphic controls of tree species composition in xerohydric wetlands. Stipend is $12k per year with the opportunity to apply for complementary room at Hancock Biological Station on Kentucky Lake. The chosen applicant will work closely with USFWS and NRCS professionals. The position begins Jan 15, 2017, by which time applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in biology, environmental science, or related field with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Applicants should have a combined Verbal + Math GRE score of 300 or higher and have a demonstrated interest in field-based and/or quantitative ecological research. A valid driver’s license upon matriculation will be essential for the fieldwork. To apply, combine the following into a single PDF file and send as an email attachment to pgagnon@murraystate.edu by November 4 with the subject titled “Graduate Research Position”: 1) a letter of introduction/essay summarizing your relevant background, experience, career goals, and interest in this position, not to exceed 2-pages, 2) resume/CV, 3) unofficial transcript, 4) 3 academic references including phone numbers, email addresses, and how each reference knows the applicant, and 5) test scores from the GRE. Posted: 9/27/16.

National University of Singapore: I would like to invite applications for a PhD scholarship on modeling strategies to increase the sustainability of rubber production in Southeast Asia. Rubber is one of the main tropical crops in terms of value and extent that has experienced rapid expansion recently. Much of the available land for rubber production expansion overlaps with mega-diverse tropical forests and much of its current distribution, mostly in Southeast Asia, overlaps with the biodiversity hotspots of Sundaland, Indo-Burma, Wallacea and the Philippines. This poses a fundamental sustainability question: how to meet future rubber demand while preserving tropical biodiversity? The PhD student will study the factors that determine rubber efficiency of production and will evaluate the land-use implications of increasing rubber yields in terms of forest clearing and land sparing for biodiversity. Objectives of the research are to: (i) identify best practices and environmental factors that explain rubber plantations efficiency; (ii) understand the socioeconomic factors that explain leakage after rubber plantation intensification; and (iii) evaluate private and public interventions that could prevent leakage and attain land sparing after rubber production intensification. Successful applicants will join the BioEcon lab at the Department of Biological Sciences in the August 2017 intake of the PhD program. The Department of Biological Sciences has over 300 graduate students from 19 countries. Facilities and research support are world-class and the university, department and PhD program are highly regarded internationally. Funding: An industry partnership scholarship covering tuition fees and including a monthly stipend for 4 years would be available for the successful candidate. To apply you would have a 2.1 or above in a relevant conservation/ ecological/ environmental/ economic quantitative degree. To apply, please send an up-to-date CV to: dbsctlr@nus.edu.sg -Roman Carrasco, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore. Deadline: 26th of May, 2017. Posted: 5/12/17.

Netherlands Institute of Ecology: Interested in the state of evidence for different ecological and evolutionary patterns and processes? Want to help researchers to make use of the Open Science when answering ‘big’ questions? Have interest in terrestrial, aquatic, or animal ecology? We have 3 Master student projects to look at the current state of Meta-analysis in these three fields. Main aim: evaluate the current state of meta-analysis in terrestrial, aquatic, and animal ecology, and use these insights to suggest the best ways to improve upon the current situation The student will: evaluate the extent to which current MA follow standardized guidelines (Transparency in Ecology and Evolution guidelines); quantify the importance of these MA to advancements in the field; map the breadth of search engines and platforms MA use to locate relevant literature; quantify the extent to which the original datasets were used in these MA, and for what purpose (as an independent source of data, or to support claims from the primary articles). Why were some dataset not used?; estimate the extent to which certain studies were not used in MA because the lack of access to the datasets; use the previous findings to guide future developments for improved MA. Please contact Dr Antica Culina if interested A.Culina@nioo.knaw.nl To learn more about the overall project and Master student project (Get in touch tab) you can also visit Meta-analysis meets Open Science. Posted: 3/7/17.

New Mexico State University: We are seeking a highly motivated Ph.D. student to work on a multidisciplinary desert/rangeland ecology project that spans the fields of plant invasion ecology and soil microbial ecology. Research will be conducted in the Northern Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico at the Jornada Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site. The project will explore the abiotic and biotic drivers of Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana) invasion, as well as assess the impacts of invasion on extant plant and microbial communities. As such, the project will ask questions including: “Does altered climate affect competitive relationships between lovegrass and native species?” “How do microbial communities change under altered climate, and how do these changes impact the plant community?” “Do plant-soil feedbacks facilitate the invasion of lovegrass and the demise of native grasses?” Additional research questions by the student will be encouraged. The student would join the labs of Drs. Lehnhoff and Pietrasiak in Entomology, Plant Pathology & Weed Science and Plant & Environmental Sciences, respectively, and would also have the opportunity to interact with a dynamic group of ecologists at the Jornada LTER. Candidates should have: a minimum of a BS degree (3.3 GPA minimum) in plant ecology or soil ecology (or a closely related field) with strong quantitative and statistical skills; independent field ecology and laboratory research experience; the ability to communicate effectively both in writing and orally; and a willingness to work long days in inclement weather including extreme heat. Ideal candidates will have: a MS degree in plant ecology or soil ecology (or a closely related field); a demonstrated capacity to lead field research including experimental design, data collection, and crew management; and ability to independently perform laboratory analyses. The position will start in June 2017 (start date may be flexible), and interested candidates should apply as soon as possible, but no later than November 20, 2016. To apply, send a cover letter describing experience and interests, CV, transcripts, and GRE scores, and provide contact information only for three professional references to both: lehnhoff@nmsu.edu and npietras@nmsu.edu. Posted: 9/23/16.

North Carolina State University: An awesome opportunity exists for a student interested in a Master’s degree in Forestry and Environmental Resources within the College of Natural Resources at NC State University. The successful candidate would focus on a project evaluating the effects of coarse woody debris and forest floor removal on soil processes and aboveground productivity. The position is fully funded with opportunities to work with a forest industry partner. For more information about this position please contact Dr. Zakiya Leggett, zakiya_leggett@ncsu.edu and to apply please email CV and transcripts (unofficial). Minimum qualifications for this position include a B.S. degree in soil science, forestry, environmental science, ecology, or a related discipline. Posted: 5/31/17.

North Carolina State University: The Watershed Ecology Lab is seeking a highly qualified PhD student. The successful applicant will focus on applied questions centered around the effects of land use change, climate change, and forest management on water resources, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity using an ecosystem modelling approach. The position includes three years of tuition support, an annual stipend of $25k, and benefits. The candidate will join the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources and have opportunities to collaborate with the NC State Center for Geospatial Analytics and the USGS Southeast Climate Science Center, among others. Candidates should have a background in ecology and ecosystem science or related disciplines and demonstrated strengths in scientific writing. To apply, please send CV, GRE scores, transcripts (unofficial) and a statement of interest and career goals to: Dr. Katie Martin, katie_martin@ncsu.edu. Posted: 2/6/17.

North Carolina State University: Now recruiting PhD and/or MS students Human Dimensions of the Environment. Priority deadlines: Fall Admission: February 15th, Spring Admission: October 15. Start date: Fall 2017 or Spring 2018. Advisor: Dr. Bethany Cutts To Apply: https://www.ncsu.edu/grad/applygrad.htm. Research Area 1: Urban Environmental Equity The successful student will work with geographers, landscape ecologists, and environmental social scientists to integrate large-scale datasets with qualitative data to answer questions about the role of environmental justice in sustainability and greening initiatives that occur through changes in property management, social norms, and/or changes in policy and policy enforcement. Students will be expected to draw from a range of quantitative and qualitative methods that may include social network analysis, remote sensing, video-based interviews and/or participatory GIS. Applicants with an interest in building technological and participatory mapping expertise that aligns with the Center for Geospatial Analytics are especially welcome. Research Area 2: Social Dimensions of Restoration and Ecosystem Services The successful student will work with social scientists and ecologists to integrate social and ecological datasets to improve understanding of the social dimensions of restoration activities in diverse landscapes. Working with stakeholders, decision-makers, and collaborators in places that may include New Mexico, North Carolina, and/or California, the student will be expected to develop a research project that contributes new theoretical and applied knowledge that helps understand how people enact collective strategies to adapt to or mitigate against irreversible transitions in human-nature relations. Students will be expected to draw from a range of quantitative and qualitative methods that may include social network analysis, GIS, and immersive geospatial technologies. Applicants with an interest in building technological and participatory mapping expertise that aligns with the Center for Geospatial Analytics are especially welcome. Visit: https://faculty.cnr.ncsu.edu/bethanycutts/ to learn more. Posted: 12/13/16.

North Carolina State University: The Ardón lab invites highly qualified candidates to apply for a Ph.D. position on a project funded by the National Science Foundation. The successful candidate will study the resilience of forested coastal wetlands under a changing climate. Desired qualifications include a Master’s degree or undergraduate research experience in biogeochemistry, aquatic ecology, soil ecology, or related environmental sciences, experience with fieldwork under adverse conditions, experience in soil and/or water chemical analyses, tree ring analyses, and familiarity with environmental sensor networks. The expected starting date is Summer or Fall 2017. The position includes a competitive stipend, tuition, and health insurance. For further information or application instructions contact Dr. Marcelo Ardón (mlardons@ncsu.edu, put PhD assistantship on the subject line), Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a candidate is selected. Member of underrepresented groups in the environmental sciences are strongly encouraged to apply. Posted: 12/12/16.

North Carolina State University: Highly competitive, field-oriented students wishing to commence master's level study in conservation biology in Fall 2017 may be interested in the following opportunity. I am looking for a student to work on US Fish & Wildlife Service-funded at-risk species surveys of Nuphar sagittifolia (Nymphaeaceae) and Ludwigia ravenii (Onagraceae). The project entails mapping known and potential localities using GIS, conducting weekly monitoring and exploratory surveys during the growing season, as well as undertaking basic studies on the species, such as pollination biology or population genetics (this latter component to be determined based on the student’s major interest). Kayaking/canoeing experience is desirable, as is a background in GIS. Support is available for a graduate student stipend to support field work, as well as a technician, and mileage. In addition, students must be able to successfully compete for a department-wide teaching assistantship (this provides a stipend, health care, and tuition remission for two years). Ideally, a student would begin work on the project in May/June 2017, prior to entry into the graduate program in August 2017. Applications to the graduate program are due January 15, 2017. If interested, please email Dr. Alexander Krings (Alexander_Krings@ncsu.edu) in advance of the deadline with the following information: (1) a brief personal statement describing your professional goals and how you see the proposed project fitting into these plans, (2) an unofficial transcript, and (3) a cv. Brief background: The Department of Plant and Microbial Biology has become a major graduate training center of agency and consultancy botanist in North Carolina, successfully placing students in such varied organizations as private environmental consulting firms, the Florida Natural Areas Inventory, the Nature Conservancy, the NC Natural Heritage Program, the NC Plant Conservation Program, the NC Botanical Garden, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the US Army Corps of Engineers. NCSU Graduate School. Posted: 11/6/16.

North Carolina State University: Graduate Research Assistantship (M.S. or Ph.D), Dept of Applied Ecology. A research assistantship is available to support an exceptional, highly-motivated student who has an inquiring mind and is in pursuit of a M.S. degree or Ph.D. in Zoology, Functional Genomics, or any other relevant graduate research degree program. The successful candidate will work in a molecular biology research laboratory and may conduct field studies on fish reproduction and spawning. The project is an exciting one that bridges food science, basic ecology, and fisheries science. The research focus goal is, in part, to understand the microbial communities that live in preserved sturgeon roes (caviars) and also, more generally, to understand the microbes that live on fishes and how they might be transferred to the eggs once they are laid. The successful candidate will spearhead laboratory research experiments including metagenomics, microbial culture, and fish rearing in recirculating aquaculture systems and work among a large group of scientists interested in topics as diverse as beer ecology, deep learning algorithms, ant nest microbiomes, and the biodiversity of belly buttons. The position could start as soon as January or August 2017. This is a two-year position for M.S. students with a possible one-year extension depending on funding and performance. The time frame will be longer for Ph.D. students and will allow for adequate time to complete the degree requirements. Questions should be directed to Dr. Benjamin Reading (bjreadin@unity.ncsu.edu). See Microbial ecology of caviar and fish eggs for more information and how to apply. Posted: 11/6/16.

North Dakota State University: PhD or MS Graduate Assistantship – Restoration of Highly Degraded Landscapes. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Ryan Limb, Assistant Professor – Range Science. Location: Range Program, School of Natural Resource Sciences. We are seeking multiple PhD or MS students to be part of an inter-disciplinary team investigating reclamation strategies for severely degraded landscapes in Northern Great Plains ecosystems. Energy exploration and development is a consistent disturbance on private and public grasslands throughout the Great Plains. However, within the Northern Great Plains invasive species and altered disturbance regimes that historically shaped and maintained these grasslands have been altered or completely removed. This student will have the opportunity to investigate soil and vegetation properties on reference and degraded landscapes to better understand mechanisms both facilitating and limiting successful reclamation. Research findings will be used to formulate best management practices and policy recommendations for private companies and government agencies on how to better restore their lands to promote diversity and ecosystem services. Qualifications include a desire to conduct ecological research and a strong academic background. The student will be expected to work well independently and with an interdisciplinary team. This student will interact with other graduate students on the project and will be required to supervise a minimum of one technician annually. Evidence of excellent written and analytical skills are strongly desired. Experience in vegetation sampling is necessary and the most competitive applicants will have experience working with plants and soils. Familiarity and experience with programs PC-ord, and R is preferred. The assistantship will commence in either Fall 2017 or Spring 2018. The successful candidate will be provided will be paid a competitive stipend and full tuition waiver. In order to be considered for this position, the following application materials must be submitted to Dr. Limb (ryan.limb@ndsu.edu): 1. A letter of interest (1 page maximum) 2. Undergraduate and graduate transcripts 3. GRE scores 4. A curriculum vitae 5. An example of your writing 6. Names of 3 individuals who will provide you with references. Posted: 6/7/17.

North Dakota State University: Soils or Entomology. Two graduate research assistantships (MS or PhD) are available in the Department of Entomology in the School of Natural Resource Sciences. Students will be part of an inter-disciplinary team looking at various aspects of managing soil salinity with cover crops in a corn-soybean rotation. Soil salinity is a persistent problem in North Dakota and many agroecosystems, and we will evaluate cereal rye as a mitigation tool. Specifically, we will address how this management approach impacts the system’s plants, soil, and insects, and we want to add students with interest in one or more of these areas. For more information: https://www.ndsu.edu/snrs/assistantship/ Closes: 4/1/17. Posted: 1/19/17.

North Dakota State University: The Greives lab in the Department of Biological Sciences, in collaboration with Dr. Page Klug and the USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services National Wildlife Research Center, is seeking a graduate student (M.S. or Ph.D.) interested in participating in research projects aimed at understanding the influence of cross-seasonal interactions on timing of life-history transitions and reproductive success (e.g. influence of overwintering habitat on reproductive timing and success) in Red-winged Blackbirds. This is a unique opportunity for individuals interested in the interface of ecological and evolutionary physiology, animal behavior, and wildlife management in agroecosystems. Specific projects can vary based on research interests but may include investigations on the influence of overwinter habitat on pre-migratory and reproductive endocrine function or the use of stable isotopes to uncover a link between overwinter habitat and seasonal reproductive timing and output. The student may either earn their degree in Biological Sciences or through the Environmental and Conservation Sciences graduate program at NDSU. Year-round funding (full tuition waiver and stipend) is available as a Graduate Research Assistant in the Biological Sciences Department at NDSU through a cooperative agreement with the USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services National Wildlife Research Center. Additional funding is available to support research and to attend conferences and training opportunities. Expected start date is August 2017. If you are interested in this position please contact Dr. Tim Greives at timothy[dot]greives[at]ndsu[dot]edu. Please include in your email your research background and interests as well as your GPA and GRE scores. Posted: 12/13/16.

North Dakota State University: A MSc position in evolutionary and ecological conservation genetics is available to study local adaptation of the perennial native prairie plant, Prairie Smoke with Jill Hamilton in the Department of Biological Sciences. Identifying the appropriate seed sources for restoration efforts can be challenging, particularly for geographically isolated populations where historical isolation or contemporary fragmentation may have contributed to differentiation in adaptive traits across a species range. In this project we are investigating the genetic basis of adaptation in Prairie Smoke (Geum triflorum) plant populations. Prairie Smoke is an herbaceous perennial that has a wide geographic distribution spanning much of contemporarily fragmented midwestern prairies, but it is also common to disjunct alvar habitats around the Great Lakes region. Alvar habitats are characterized by thin layers of soil over limestone that harbor unique assemblages of plants that are largely isolated from the core of their continuous range. The ideal MS student will be prepared to conduct field-based research in a common garden experiment that has been established in Minnesota, with an opportunity to expand locations. There is plenty of room to pursue particular interests in adaptive trait variation depending on the interest and experience of the candidate. The student will also be involved in outreach activities associated with the project engaging local state and NGO stakeholders in applied research. Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Hamilton (jill.hamilton@ndsu.edu). Please include a brief description of your research interests and experience and a CV in your email. Funding options are available for both US students and international students. Posted: 8/30/16.

North Dakota State University: A graduate research assistantship (PhD) investigating the distribution and abundance of pollinator species across North Dakota is available in the School of Natural Resource Sciences. The student will join an inter-disciplinary team of researchers and will have the opportunity to collaborate with other graduate students and faculty. Annual stipend will be $23,500 (3% cost of living increases annually) plus a full tuition-waiver. Preferred Qualifications: Candidates must have a Master of Science degree from an accredited university and a valid driver’s license. The most competitive applicants will have multiple years of field experience including previous work with pollinators and grassland plant species identification. Students will be expected to work well independently and with a team and should have experience using some or all of the following programs: ArcGIS, program MARK, PRESENCE, Distance, and program R. To apply: Submit 1 document (.pdf) that includes a 1) cover letter discussing your qualifications, ambitions, and future aspirations, 2) curriculum vitae, 3)transcripts (unofficial), and 4) three professional references to torre.hovick@gmail.com. Any questions please email Dr. Torre Hovick at torre.hovick@gmail.com. Posted: 7/12/16.

Northeastern University: The Ries Lab in the Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences at Northeastern University’s Marine Science Center (MSC) seeks a graduate student interested in conducting federally funded research on the impact of past and future ocean acidification and warming on the process of calcareous biomineralization, to begin summer/fall 2017. Research will include employing a multi-disciplinary approach (scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, isotope geochemistry, microelectrode analysis, metatranscriptomics, proteomics, biomechanical analysis) to investigate the impact of past and future ocean acidification and warming on shell production, mineralogy, elemental chemistry, structure, function, and calcifying fluid chemistry. This opportunity affords access to newly acquired state-of-the-art analytical equipment at the MSC, including a laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer for trace element analysis, a powder x-ray diffractometer for mineralogical characterization, an environmental scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometry and electron backscatter diffraction for micro-imaging and elemental/mineralogical mapping of skeletal ultrastructure, and a 72-tank array for conducting ocean acidification/warming experiments. The selected graduate student will receive interdisciplinary training in global change research, carbonate biogeochemistry, invertebrate biomineralization, isotope geochemistry, and deployment of pH microelectrodes and pH-sensitive dyes for quantifying calcifying fluid chemistry. The graduate student will be based at MSC, located on the shores of Massachusetts Bay on the Nahant tombolo (13 miles north of downtown Boston). The renovated MSC features a state-of-the-art flow through seawater facility, direct access to classic New England rocky shore intertidal study sites, an in-house SCUBA program, and small-craft research vessels. Highly motivated and creative individuals with strong writing and analytical skills are encouraged to apply. Interested individuals should apply to Northeastern’s Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences’ Ph.D. program in Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology. Although applications will be accepted through December 15, 2016, earlier submission is strongly encouraged. Please direct specific inquiries to Prof. Justin Ries (j.ries@northeastern.edu). Posted: 11/29/16.

Northern Arizona University: Applications are invited for a student to join the M.S. program in Environmental Science and Policy (ES&P) in the School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Sustainability. The student will work on a NSF-funded Coupled Natural-Human Systems project to study connectivity between protected areas and surrounding socio-ecological systems. The successful applicant will lead the ecological field data collection component of this project, working closely with an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional group of PIs as well as with undergraduate and graduate students from different institutions and disciplines. The successful applicant will perform summer fieldwork in several national parks across the US, collecting vegetation and habitat data. Current funding will cover research costs and summer stipend as well as two academic years of stipend and tuition for the successful applicant. The ideal candidate will have: Strong willingness to work independently and collaboratively with interdisciplinary colleagues from diverse backgrounds Experience conducting ecological research Ability to perform strenuous physical activity, particularly hiking to reach sampling sites Comfort with camping in the field during data collection season Interest in interdisciplinary, coupled-systems quantitative modeling Interested applicants should send an email addressed to Clare Aslan (clare.aslan@nau.edu). In addition to the preferred qualifications for these positions, potential candidates must meet the admission standards and be fully accepted into the ES&P MS program. Application materials are due January 15, 2017 for Fall 2017 admission. The MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy offers the opportunity to apply a scientific understanding of the environment to inform policy decisions. An emphasis in science and policy allows students a scientific examination of natural resources (such as air, water, and land) and integration of this scientific knowledge with an examination of environmental law, regulation, and policy. Posted: 12/23/16.

Northern Arizona University: PhD and MS positions in Ecosystem Ecology are available in the Center for Ecosystem Science in Society (Ecoss) at Northern Arizona University. The Ecoss mission is to conduct high-impact, innovative research on ecosystems and how they respond to and shape environmental change, to train next-gen scientists, and to communicate discovery and its relevance to people. Research opportunities are available in the following areas linked to specific Ecoss faculty: (1) The impact of climate change on Alaskan ecosystems, including effects of changing fire and permafrost on plants, soils, and ecosystem services. M. Mack, T. Schuur. (2) How microorganisms shape the ecology of planet Earth and its responses to environmental change, from soils to hot springs to humans. B. Hungate, P. Dijkstra, E. Schwartz. (3) Freshwater ecology, including the science of river restoration and dam removal, terrestrial aquatic interactions and food web ecology. J. Marks. (4) Exploring the interaction of water and carbon metabolism in diverse studies ranging from the limits to height growth of the world's tallest trees to drought responses of soil microorganisms. G. Koch. Graduate student benefits include stipend (TA or RA), tuition waiver, health insurance, support for summer fieldwork in a variety of beautiful ecosystems, and winter in the peaks of sunny Flagstaff, AZ. Candidates should explore the Ecoss website (ecoss.nau.edu) and contact the professor whose interests align most closely. Please include a cover letter describing background, research interests, and qualifications, as well as a current resume. Program applications can be submitted to the Department of Biological Sciences, due January 15, 2017 after communicating with faculty member. Applications received by October 15 may be considered for a prestigious NAU Presidential Fellowship. Posted: 9/26/16.

Northern Illinois University: A Ph.D. assistantship beginning January 2017 in Ecosystem Restoration & Functional/Community Ecology is available in the lab of Nick Barber as part of the NSF-funded Restoring Function in Grassland Ecosystems (ReFuGE) project in collaboration with Holly Jones. This project seeks to understand how ecosystem restoration and management shapes consumer communities and how this influences ecosystem function. We seek a Ph.D. student to investigate the effects of tallgrass prairie restoration and management (prescribed fire, bison grazing, and predator exclusion) on insect community assembly and plant-insect interactions. Experience with arthropod identification, quantification of functional traits, or stable isotope analysis are desirable. Applicants should have a B.S. in ecology, environmental science, wildlife science, entomology, natural resource conservation, or closely related discipline, with at least one peer-reviewed publication or an M.S. degree; a M.S. is preferred. Preference will be given to candidates who have past experience leading their own research project, with strong basic ecology backgrounds, and those that have experience working in inclement conditions. The assistantship includes two years of support (tuition, stipend, and research funds) after which the student will be supported by a departmental teaching assistantship. Field work for the ReFuGE project takes place at The Nature Conservancy’s Nachusa Grasslands, a landscape-scale tallgrass prairie restoration project 40 minutes from NIU’s campus. Qualified candidates should submit the following to Nick Barber (nbarber@niu.edu) by September 9, 2016: 1) Cover letter explaining your research interests and qualifications 2) CV including GRE scores 3) Names and contact information of three references. Posted: 8/23/16.

Northwestern University/Chicago Botanic Garden: The Graduate Program in Plant Biology and Conservation is a partnership between Northwestern University (NU) and the Chicago Botanic Garden (CBG). PhD, MS thesis-based, and MS internship-based degrees are offered. All the degree programs offer a unique opportunity to study ecology, evolution, and environmental issues at the interface of basic and applied plant science. Students apply to the program through Northwestern University and take their courses at both NU and CBG with faculty from both institutions. The Plant Conservation and Science Center at CBG is a valuable resource for students, and the Chicago region provides an excellent community at the forefront of research in conservation and sustainability. To learn more, contact program director, Nyree Zerega (nzerega@chicagobotanic.org) or visit the Graduate Program link above. Application deadlines: PhD: December 1, 2016; MS (thesis-based): February 15, 2017; MS (internship-based): Applications will be reviewed beginning February 15 and review will continue through April 30, 2017. Posted: 10/11/16.

Ohio State University: We are seeking a PhD student interested in studying how species interactions and food-web dynamics in rivers ecosystems vary across land-use patterns. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Lauren Pintor and Dr. Mazeika Sullivan. On going research in the Pintor laboratory focuses on aquatic community, invasion and behavioral ecology. On going research in the Sullivan/STRIVE Lab focuses on understanding natural and human drivers of biodiversity, community and food-web organization, and ecosystem function. Together, we are interested in recruiting a student to advance research that links species interactions within river and inland lake food webs with food-web connectance and resilience. Multiple laboratory facilities support our research, teaching, and outreach activities, including SENR’s Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (ORWRP). Interested applicants should send a short description of your interests and career goals, a CV/resume, your GPA (undergraduate & graduate, if applicable) and your GRE scores and percentiles to Dr. Lauren Pintor and Dr. Mazeika Sullivan. Review of applications will begin immediately. Following an initial review of applications, we will select the most competitive candidates to formally apply to the SENR graduate program. Additionally, Dr. Sullivan will be available to speak in person with any applicants attending the Society of Freshwater Science Meeting (June 5-9, 2017) in Raleigh, NC. General information regarding the SENR Graduate Program and application process. Posted: 5/9/17.

Ohio State University: Drs. Michael Fraker and Stuart Ludsin have an opening for a MS (or possibly Ph.D.) student to begin during fall 2017 (with funding to begin as soon as March). The student would work on a project designed to better understand how prey integrate phenotypically-plastic antipredator defenses (behavior, morphology) over their development. The student also would work closely with collaborators on the project (Dr. Robert Denver, University of Michigan; Dr. Barney Luttbeg, Oklahoma State University) and would have opportunities to initiate independent research related to project objectives. Project: Amphibian tadpoles display extensive phenotypic plasticity in anti-predator defenses that enhance fitness by increasing survival to metamorphosis. While the induction of these defenses and their evolutionary and ecological significance have been extensively studied, the proximate mechanisms that underlie them are largely unknown. Because these responses are employed with different lags to predator exposure and have different consequences to species interactions, we must learn how these responses are mechanistically integrated and what tradeoffs are implicated. We found that tadpole anti-predator defenses are partly controlled by a bimodal physiological stress response that is initiated by an alarm pheromone released from tadpole skin in response to predator attack. Tadpoles suppress behavior and their neuroendocrine stress axis in the short-term, with this behavioral inhibition enhancing survivorship by reducing exposure to predators. However, tadpoles increase stress hormonal activity over a longer time frame, which induces adaptive changes in tail and body morphology. These changes either enhance survivorship by facilitating escape behavior or by providing a decoy (large tail) to deflect lethal predator attacks from the more vulnerable body. Our research approach will use endocrinological measurements and modifications (i.e., blocking or enhancing the stress response with exogenous hormones/drugs) in conjunction with ecological lab and mesocosm experiments and dynamic state variable modeling. We seek to learn: 1) how the prey neuroendocrine stress response operates over time under a complex predation environment; 2) how stress hormones govern the expression and integration of the prey phenotypic response (i.e., behavior, morphology) in an ecological context; and 3) what the fitness consequences of this regulation are. Successful candidates will join a dynamic, interactive group of students, post-docs, and faculty at the Aquatic Ecology Laboratory within the Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology. Qualifications: Successful applicants will be creative, motivated, and capable of working effectively both independently and in collaborative groups. A bachelor’s degree in biology, ecology, or a related field is required. Strong writing and quantitative skills are essential. A background in endocrinology or computational modeling also would be useful. Stipend: ~$2,325/month plus full tuition waiver and health benefits. Full Graduate Research Associates (GRA) support exists for ~2.5 years, with opportunities to teach (if so desired). Graduate Teaching Associate (GTA) support also exists for those interested in staying longer to complete a PhD. EEOB’s application deadline has been extended to January 15, 2017 to accommodate this position. In addition to applying online, please email Drs. Michael Fraker and Stuart Ludsin at apps.ael@gmail.com: 1) a letter of interest that briefly describes your educational and research background, as well as your research interests/goals; 2) a curriculum vitae that also includes your GRE and (if applicable) TOEFL/TSE scores; 3) an unofficial copy of your transcripts; and 4) contact information for at least three professional references. Please put “Graduate Student Position” in the subject line. Posted: 1/3/17.

Ohio State University: The School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR) currently offers MS and PhD programs with a specialization in Ecological Restoration. Our faculty have expertise in terrestrial vegetation ecology, soil remediation and rehabilitation, forestry, wildland fire management, wetland science and the environmental social sciences. Fully funded positions are advertised when available but SENR applicants are also able to apply for Graduate Teaching Associate positions and Fellowships. Such awards provide a stipend, generous health benefits and cover tuition and fee costs. The following faculty welcome enquiries from students interested in Ecosystem Restoration: Nick Basta, G. Matt Davies, Charles Goebel, Brian Slater: 1. Holistic rehabilitation and restoration of contaminated, brownfield and urban sites (Basta) 2. Controls on reproductive effort in woodland pawpaw stands (Davies) 3. The ecological structure, function and restoration of agricultural field margins (Davies) 4. The use of fire as a management and restoration tool (Davies, Goebel) 5. Function and restoration of wooded riparian areas in agricultural landscapes (Goebel) 6. Hydrology and ecology of headwater streams and riparian areas in forested landscapes (Goebel) 7. Soil resilience in agricultural systems (Slater). We particularly welcome applications from U.S. citizen candidates who will bring diversity to our graduate community. Graduate Enrichment Fellowships are available to support such students. Candidates should meet the following criteria: • GPA - minimum 3.1 on a 4.0 scale • GRE - 40% or higher on the Verbal and Quantitative and a score of 3 or greater on the Analytical For the University Fellowships you should meet the following criteria (successful applicants are likely to have higher metrics and some research or professional experience): • GPA - minimum 3.6 on a 4.0 scale • GRE - 75% or higher on the Verbal and Quantitative and a score of 4 or greater on the Analytical. Potential applicants should first consult the School’s directory and contact the faculty member relevant to their interests. When enquiring please include a brief (1-2 page) C.V. and state your GPA and GRE (if available) scores. Please indicate which fellowship scheme you are interested in being considered for. Deadline for application: January 7th 2017 (earlier preferred). Posted: 12/13/16.

Ohio State University: The Stream and River Ecology Laboratory (Dr. Mazeika Sullivan) in the School of Environment and Natural Resources is seeking a highly-qualified M.Sc. student (Ph.D. possible). The student will have the opportunity to develop research related to linked aquatic-terrestrial food webs, biodiversity, and landscape change in river-riparian ecosystems. Applicants should have experience in both field and laboratory settings, be highly motivated with a strong work ethic, and have competitive GPA and GRE scores. Candidates should provide the following materials to Dr. Sullivan (sullivan.191@osu.edu) by December 23: a brief description of research interests, CV, GRE scores (with percentiles), and contact information for three references. Posted: 12/12/16.

Ohio State University: We are seeking a PhD student interested in studying how trait variation and species interactions determine food-web structure in river and inland lake ecosystems. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Lauren Pintor and Dr. Mazeika Sullivan. On going research in the Pintor laboratory focuses on how within-population variation in species traits (e.g. behavior) influence the outcome of species interactions, often in the context of biological invasions. On going research in the Sullivan/STRIVE Lab focuses on understanding natural and human drivers of biodiversity, community and food-web organization, and ecosystem function. Together, we are interested in recruiting a student to advance research that links trait variation of key players within river and inland lake food webs with food-web connectance and resilience. Multiple laboratory facilities support our research, teaching, and outreach activities, including SENR’s Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (ORWRP). Interested applicants should send a short description of your interests and career goals, a CV/resume, your GPA (undergraduate & graduate, if applicable) and your GRE scores and percentiles to Dr. Lauren Pintor (pintor.6@osu.edu) and Dr. Mazeika Sullivan (sullivan.191@osu.edu). Priority will be given to applicants who apply by December 1, 2016. Following an initial review of applications, we will select the most competitive candidates to more formally apply to the SENR graduate program. General information regarding the SENR Graduate Program and application process. Posted: 11/15/16.

Ohio State University: The Gray Aquatic Physiological Ecology Lab in the School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR), is interested in recruiting a MS or PhD student to begin Summer or Autumn 2017. Potential research projects will fall under the general theme of research in the lab: understanding how fish respond to human-induced environmental change, with a focus on behavioral and physiological responses to globally significant aquatic stressors such as turbidity, low dissolved oxygen, and increasing temperature. We work on both local and international projects, ranging from the visual ecology of forage and game fish in Lake Erie to adaptive divergence in African cichlid fish. We use a combination of field and laboratory experiments. Interested students can find out more about our current projects by visiting the lab website: http://u.osu.edu/gray.1030/ Applicants should be highly motivated to pursue an advanced degree in this field and have experience working in aquatic ecosystems. Skills such as collecting fish using a variety of techniques in diverse aquatic environments, rearing and/or maintaining live fish in aquaria, statistical analyses of complex data sets, and scientific writing are preferred. Competitive applicants will also have excellent GPA (>3.6) and GRE (>75th percentile) scores to be eligible for university fellowships. Several lines of potential funding are available through OSU fellowships, SENR graduate research and teaching assistantships, and through external sources. Please send inquiries and application materials to Dr. Suzanne Gray (gray.1030@osu.edu). Your email should include, as a single PDF: (1) a one page cover letter describing your academic experience and why you are pursuing a graduate degree; (2) Curriculum Vitae; (3) names and email addresses for 3 academic references; and, (4) unofficial transcripts and GRE scores. Preference will be given to those applications received before Nov. 25, 2016. After reviewing all applications I will select several candidates to discuss more formally applying to our graduate program. Posted: 11/8/16.

Ohio State University: Graduate assistantships in watershed, river, estuarine and coastal ocean biogeochemistry. Research support is available starting in Fall 2017 for graduate study in carbon and organic matter biogeochemistry in the Aquatic Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology. Support is competitive and includes full stipend and tuition for up to 5 years for Ph.D. students and 3 years for M.S. students. We seek motivated, creative individuals to take part in new research initiatives on 1) carbon and organic matter cycling and the controls on carbon ages, reactivity, and transport between land, atmosphere, rivers and the coastal ocean and 2) the sources and ages of carbon and organic matter supporting aquatic consumers and food webs. For additional information, please visit our web site or contact Dr. James Bauer (bauer.362@osu.edu). The deadline for applications for admission and support is December 1, 2016. Application instructions and additional information are available from the EEOB Graduate Program website. Posted: 11/6/16.

Ohio State University: The Gibbs Lab in the Department of EEOB is interested in recruiting a Ph.D. student, to begin in Fall 2017, to develop a dissertation project that focuses on the molecular basis of coevolution between venomous snakes and their prey. The student would be part of a group conducting collaborative research to identify the genetic, protein and functional basis of the traits that mediate interactions between rattlesnakes and their mammalian prey in an ecological context (for example, see Holding et al. 2016. Proc R Soc B 283:20152841) with the specific focus of the dissertation being flexible depending on the research interests of the student. The student would also have the opportunity to be involved in a recently-awarded NSF Dimensions of Biodiversity grant on snake venom evolution that involves collaborations between institutions in the US and Brazil. The ideal applicant would have prior research in population genetics or molecular ecology, molecular laboratory skills, strong quantitative skills and proficiency or interest in learning basic bioinformatics. Field experience with vertebrates would be beneficial. A Master’s degree is preferred but not required. The student would join an active lab which applies genomic techniques and bioinformatics analyses to a wide range of questions in the evolutionary biology and conservation genetics of snakes, birds, and salamanders. The Department of EEOB provides year-round financial support (~$28K/yr plus benefits and tuition) for PhD students for the duration of their program. Interested students should contact Dr. H. Lisle Gibbs, Department of EEOB, Ohio State University at gibbs.128@osu.edu with a statement of interest, a CV, transcripts and GRE scores if available. I will start reviewing applications on 15 October. Posted: 8/30/16.

Ohio State University: A graduate research opportunity is available in the Department of Entomology to study how a legacy industrial urbanization has influenced soil capacity to provide ecosystem services, with a focus on those needed to sustain urban agriculture. The selected PhD student will conduct field and laboratory research to measure biological, chemical, and physical facets of soil quality. The project will compare soils from urban vacant lots, urban farms, parks, and rural organic farms. The student could select to evaluate soils from these habitats for microbial community structure, invertebrates, metabolites, mineral and heavy metal levels, as well as predation activity and promotion of plant health and resistance. Interested applicants should contact project PI's for more information about the project and The Ohio State University graduate student application process. Project PI’s: P. Larry Phelan (phelan.2@osu.edu) and Mary M. Gardiner (gardiner.29@osu.edu). Posted: 8/23/16.

Ohio University: The Snell lab in the department of Environmental and Plant Biology is currently recruiting highly qualified and motivated graduate students (MSc or PhD) to start in the 2017 academic year. Our group studies the processes and interactions that shape plant communities, from the stand, to landscape and regional scale. These processes are integrated into dynamic vegetation models, to improve our understanding of how plants will respond to future climate change and to quantify climate change impacts. Graduate students are encouraged to develop independent research projects related to the broader objectives of the lab. Ongoing research includes, 1) The influence of climate on plant demographic processes and resulting range shifts, 2) The provisioning of ecosystem services under current and future climate, 3) The importance of spatial and temporal variability for determining plant responses to climate change. Applicants should have a background in ecology, plant biology, environmental science, forestry or a related discipline, previous research experience, and evidence of strong communication and quantitative skills. Experience with R and/or other computer programming languages is preferred. Please check out the links above for more information and application instructions. The deadline to apply to Ohio University’s Graduate College is January 15 2017. However, I strongly encourage interested students to contact Dr. Snell (snell@ohio.edu) well before this date, to allow enough time for discussing potential research projects. Please email Dr. Snell (snell@ohio.edu) your CV, GRE scores, unofficial transcripts, and a letter of interest, outlining your previous research experience and the research topics that you are interested in pursuing during your graduate degree (i.e., why do you want to join my lab?). International students should also include their TOEFL scores, if appropriate. Qualified individuals will be invited to apply to Ohio University’s Graduate College. Posted: 10/12/16.

Oklahoma State University: We are recruiting a Ph.D. student to work on a project studying the behavioral ecology of quail. The student will work in the Wilder lab in the Department of Integrative Biology as part of a larger collaboration with another Integrative Biology faculty member and faculty in the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management at OSU. The overall scope of the collaborative project is to test how quail respond to multiple interacting stressors (food, temperature and predation risk). While the scope of the Ph.D. research is somewhat flexible, at least part of the work will be testing how the quantity and quality of food resources used by adult quail and chicks varies across the landscape. The project will be funded for 4 years pending final approval. The project will involve significant fieldwork at research stations in Western Oklahoma during the spring and summer. Fieldwork will include capturing birds, radio telemetry, GPS collars, and habitat measurements. The candidate should have a driver’s license and be capable of working in the field for extended periods under challenging conditions (e.g. high temperatures). The project will start in the summer of 2017. The ideal candidate will have completed or be completing a M.S., have peer-reviewed publications, and prior fieldwork experience. Although, candidates not meeting these criteria are still encouraged to apply. Please email me (shawn.wilder@okstate.edu) with any questions. To apply, send a cover letter describing your research experience and qualifications, a copy of your CV with GPA and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references to: shawn.wilder@okstate.edu. Please send application materials as soon as possible and no later than February 15, 2017 [extended]. Posted: 12/15/16, revised: 1/31/17.

Oklahoma State University: Urban Ecology of Ticks, Tick-borne Diseases, and Bird & Mammal Hosts (MS). The position will begin in January 2017 with support available for 2.5 years ($16.5k/yr plus health insurance and tuition waiver). Oklahoma is one of the most ecologically diverse states, with ecosystem types ranging from forested mountains in the southeast to mesas and canyons in the west. As a result, the state contains a broad diversity of plants and animals, and recreational opportunities abound, with national forests, national wildlife refuges, and countless lakes all within 2-3 hours of Stillwater and Oklahoma City. Required qualifications - Applicants must possess: a B.S. degree in Biology, Entomology, Wildlife Biology, or a related field; a strong work ethic and sense of self-motivation; the ability to work independently and with a small team in a management capacity; and a strong interest in basic and applied ecology. Applicants must also possess a valid US driver’s license. Preferred: Applicants with extensive experience coordinating field projects/crews, completing mentored independent research, handling wild birds, conducting vegetation and deer pellet count/browse surveys, and/or using GIS and statistical analysis software will be especially competitive. TO APPLY: send (by September 2nd) applications consisting of a SINGLE ZIP FILE that includes: (1) a cover letter outlining how they meet the above required and preferred qualifications, (2) CV, (3) unofficial academic transcripts, (4) GRE Scores, and (5) contact information for three references to Dr. Bruce Noden (bruce.noden@okstate.edu). See also: Dr. Scott Loss’s research. Posted: 7/25/16.

Old Dominion University: I am currently looking for an *exceptional* PhD candidate to work on my Acorn Woodpecker project. This person must be highly motivated and have a strong interest in behavioral ecology (while I normally embrace conservation research, this project is more suited to someone with interests in the evolution of cooperative behavior rather than applied conservation questions). The woodpecker project has served as one of the model systems in our study of the evolution of cooperative breeding. The population has been monitored for nearly 50 years and represents one of the longest continuous vertebrate studies in the world. This is a unique opportunity to join our international research team. The research will be conducted at our field site in Carmel Valley, California and will require that the candidate be able to rope climb trees up to about 70 feet (~20 meters). The academic portion of the degree will take place at ODU in Norfolk, Virginia. If interested, drop me a line and tell me why you are the right fit. Here is what I need: 1. A letter of interest that tells me about your research interests, background, types of questions you are interested in, etc.; 2. An unofficial university transcript (your undergraduate GPA should be >3.5); 3. Your Graduate Record Exam (GRE) -- scores (verbal and quantitative) should be >316 to be competitive for scholarships / fellowships; 4. Your CV; 5. Anything else that you think makes you uniquely qualified for the position. More information. Eric L. Walters, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0266, email: grad_positions@ericlwalters.org. Posted: 5/31/17.

Old Dominion University: The Bartol Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences at has a research assistantship available for a Ph.D. student to work on a NSF-sponsored project on cephalopod maneuverability. This project focuses on understanding how the jet, fins, and arms operate in concert to produce the necessary forces for turning in squid and cuttlefish of different developmental stages. The research will involve fieldwork in marine labs in Maine and Virginia and will provide an opportunity to learn cutting edge skills in high-speed videography and 2D/3D velocimetry. Students with a M.S. degree and background in comparative physiology/biomechanics are preferable, and the goal is to fill this research assistantship by the Summer or Fall 2017 semester. A competitive stipend and tuition waiver will be provided. Prior to applying to our graduate program, please contact Dr. Ian Bartol via email (ibartol@odu.edu), with the following information: 1) curriculum vitae, 2) GRE scores, 3) unofficial transcript, and 4) a brief statement of research experience and interests. Following contact with Dr. Bartol, students will need to apply to the Ecological Sciences Ph.D. Program, which has an application deadline of February 1, 2017. Posted: 1/17/17.

Oregon State University: PhD opportunity in a project evaluating the physiological mechanisms behind observed differences in productivity and survival of conifer seedlings growing under different levels of vegetation management in Pacific North West U.S. The project aims to better understand the effects of vegetation management treatments on the soil and plant water relations of conifer plantations in the Pacific North West by analyzing conifer seedling and competing vegetation interactions during the first two years after planting. Measurements will include, among others ecophysiological assessments, soil moisture, plant water potential and biomass growth of both, conifer seedlings and competing vegetation. The student will be expected to produce compelling scientific articles for publication in peer-reviewed journals. The Doctor of Philosophy in Sustainable Forest Management position is fully funded for three years. Includes an annual stipend plus tuition and fees, and involves collaboration with researchers at the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. The successful student will have the opportunity to work with members of the Vegetation Management Research Cooperative (VMRC). The VMRC consists of private companies, public land management agencies and scientists from Oregon State University that are working together to conduct applied forest regeneration research. The ideal candidate should be a highly motivated individual with strong interests in applied ecophysiology, intensive silviculture management of planted forests, and strong quantitative skills. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to present the results of the thesis project at VMRC annual meetings and at scientific conferences. Qualifications: MSc. degree in forest science or a related field and GRE scores >60th percentile. Application deadline: March 1, 2017 (or until position filled). Starting date: Fall 2017 (classes start on September 20, 2017). Send letter of interest, CV with contact information for three references, and copies of transcripts and GRE scores (if available, unofficial is fine) to Dr. Carlos A. Gonzalez-Benecke, carlos.gonzalez@oregonstate.edu. Posted: 12/12/16.

Oregon State University: The EcoHydro Engineering Group directed by Dr. Stephen Good is currently recruiting PhD Students for a funded research examining plant hydraulic traits and soil moisture dynamics. Support is available for highly motivated PhD students with strong backgrounds that span engineering, geosciences, ecology, computer science, mathematics, and similar fields. Candidates with an M.S. degree and strong skills in programing or large data set analysis are sought. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Good and apply for Fall 2017 admission through the interdisciplinary Water Resources Graduate Program or the Biological and Ecological Engineering Department. Posted: 11/6/16.

Oregon State University: PhD opportunity, College of Forestry. Research areas: Plant ecophysiology /Forest ecology/ Global change biology. The Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society will be filling one Ph.D. position to work on a project entitled, "Collaborative research: Blending ecology and evolution using emerging technologies to determine species distributions with a non-native pathogen in a rapidly changing climate." The position will start in either June or September 2017. This NSF-funded project is a multi-university collaboration examining the interacting evolutionary and ecological responses of southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis) to climate change and an invasive pathogen from local to regional scales. The position will focus on leaf- and tree-scale ecophysiology measurements (gas exchange, along with thermal and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging) in conjunction with thermal, hyperspectral, and LiDAR measurements collected by UAVs. Preference will be given to applicants with prior ecophysiology and/or remote sensing experience. Three years of research assistantship funding (stipend + health insurance) are available for this position; additional funding may be available through fellowships or teaching assistantships. Outstanding candidates may be nominated for OSU and College of Forestry Fellowships and Awards. Start date for the position is June 15, 2017 or September 15, 2017. The Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society brings together students, staff and faculty with interest and expertise in forest biology and social science to tackle some of the most pressing environmental challenges facing us today. Our faculty are world leaders in wide range of disciplines, including restoration ecology, forest social science, tree physiology, climate change and carbon dynamics, natural resource economics and policy, wilderness resource management, silviculture, wildlife ecology, and remote sensing. We also have living laboratories used for classes and research that include the 11,500 acre McDonald-Dunn Forest, just 20 minutes from campus, the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Cascade Mountains (a NSF Long-term Ecological Research site), and a wide variety of cooperating public and private forest lands. Forest Ecosystems and Society graduate program. Interested candidates should send an application (a curriculum vitae, a description of research interests and experience, and contact information for 3 references) to Christopher Still (chris.still@oregonstate.edu) by December 15, 2016. Posted: 11/6/16.

Oregon State University: A Graduate Research Assistantship (PhD) on understanding spatial and temporal patterns of wild and domestic ungulate grazing ecology is available. Research will be conducted at Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (near La Grande, Oregon) as part of a long-term, collaborative project evaluating restoration and management of riparian ecosystems in the interior Pacific Northwest. The project will integrate field-collected habitat information, gps/telemetry data of ungulate distributions and data collect via remote sensing to better understand factors that influence spatial and temporal movements of cattle, elk, and deer across heterogeneous mountain watersheds. Applicants must have a M.S. degree in Ecology, Rangeland Sciences, Wildlife Science, Animal Science or related discipline. Applicants should have the following qualifications: (1) ability to publish in peer-reviewed journals, (2) knowledge of GIS and spatial analyses, (3) basic understanding of grazing ecology and herbivore-environment interactions, (4) ability to work independently and in a collaborative environment. An assistantship that covers tuition expenses and a competitive stipend is available. The position will be based at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Union, Oregon, but students will spend time in Corvallis for coursework. If interested, please send a cover letter indicating your interest in the position, stating how your background and qualifications match the position requirements, your curriculum vitae (CV), and contact information for at the least three references. Please send the requested documents electronically as a single PDF file to Bryan Endress ( bryan.endress@oregonstate.edu). START DATE: JAN. 2017 OR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE THEREAFTER. Posted: 10/22/16.

Oregon State University: The Landscape Ecology, Modeling, Mapping & Analysis (LEMMA) team at OSU’s College of Forestry is seeking a top-performing and motivated Ph.D. student to examine forest disturbance and recovery dynamics across California, Oregon, and Washington beginning in Fall 2017. Depending on research interests and skills, the student will focus on one of two research areas: (1) quantifying biotic and abiotic factors contributing to forest disturbance and recovery patterns and (2) understanding the limitations of and improving upon predictive satellite-based vegetation maps. Applicants should take care to identify which of the two areas is of primary interest in their application materials. The student will work closely with both the department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University and US Forest Service scientists specializing in landscape ecology, remote sensing, and statistical modeling. While the student will work extensively with remotely sensed data, the student will collect field data in support of their research. Additionally, the student will be expected to produce at least three first-author publications as part of their research. A competitive candidate will hold a completed a master’s degrees in ecology, environmental science, remote sensing, or related fields, and provide evidence of excellence in academic pursuits and research, a strong background in quantitative methods and GIS, programming skills and evidence of strong written and oral communication skills. Please contact Dr. Lisa Ganio (lisa.ganio@oregonstate.edu) or Dr. David Bell (dmbell@fs.fed.us) for additional information or to submit review materials (a statement of interest, CV, description of research interests and experience, GRE scores, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for three professional references). Application review will begin November 1, 2016. Posted: 8/30/16.

Oregon State University: PhD research assistantship. We are seeking a highly motivated individual interested in studying cattle grazing systems within the context of multiple use management of wildland and rangeland resources. Specifically, this project will focus on understanding factors that influence the movement and distribution of cattle across a watershed under a grazing system designed to promote recovery of riparian ecosystems. Research will be conducted at Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (outside of La Grande, Oregon) as part of a long-term, collaborative multidisciplinary project evaluating restoration and management of riparian ecosystems in the interior Pacific Northwest. Applicants must have earned a Master of Science degree in Ecology, Rangeland Ecology, Wildlife Science, Animal Science or related discipline. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Bryan Endress and Dr. David Bohnert. Experience/qualifications: (1) ability to publish in peer-reviewed scientific journals, (2) experience analyzing spatial data using GIS, (3) field experience in rugged terrain, (4) experience with programming and developing ecological models, (5) experience working in rangelands and forests, (6) motivated individual with ability to work independently. A research assistantship that covers tuition expenses and a competitive stipend is available. The position will be based at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Union, Oregon, but students will spend time in Corvallis for coursework. If interested, please first contact Dr. Bryan Endress (bryan.endress@oregonstate.edu)indicating your interest in the position before applying. Apply at: http://gradschool.oregonstate.edu/admissions. Additionally, please send a cover letter indicating your interest in the position, stating how your background and qualifications match the position requirements, your curriculum vitae (CV) detailing your education, awards, publications, skills, and research experience, and contact information for at the least three references. Please send the requested documents electronically as a single PDF file to Bryan Endress (bryan.endress@oregonstate.edu). START DATE: FALL 2016 OR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE THEREAFTER. Posted: 7/18/16.

Pennsylvania State University: Graduate Assistantship On Fuels, Fire Effects, and Fire Ecology in Mid-Atlantic Forests. An assistantship is available on a project that is examining the relationship between social perspectives on prescribed burning and prescribed fire effects on ecosystems. This assistantship will involve analysis of pre and post fire data on fuels and vegetation characteristics and modeling of future vegetation development and fire behavior. The assistantship is available for the academic year and also includes financial support for the summer. Successful applicants should have a BS or MS in a relevant field of study, a strong interest in fire and vegetation ecology, climate change, and natural resources, the ability to work with an interdisciplinary research team including resource managers, and strong writing and communication skills. For more information contact: Dr. Alan Taylor, Department of Geography, aht1@psu.edu (814)865-1509. Application information. Posted: 11/15/16.

Pennsylvania State University: MS Teaching Assistantship in Stress Physiology and PRNP genotypes to Assess Susceptibility of Elk to Chronic Wasting Disease. Description: MS Teaching Assistantship is available to start in the spring/fall 2017 in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management and the Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at The Pennsylvania State University. The student will work in the Sheriff Lab and Walter Applied Spatial Ecology Lab. The project involves research on stress hormone levels and GPS datasets to identify potential subpopulation structuring leading to depressed recruitment throughout the range of elk in central Pennsylvania. The project will also assess PRNP genotype frequencies from the same elk to assess potential for susceptibility to chronic wasting disease. The ideal candidate will have experience with or a combination of experiences with the following: Program R, stress hormone laboroatory practices, and experience in extraction, amplification, and genotyping of DNA from tissue samples. Qualifications: Minimum of a BS degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Science or related field with background in population/conservation/landscape genetics . Graduate research will primarily be laboratory analysis of samples collected but may include some some travel and field work to collect tissue samples. The most qualified applicants will have previous experience in the laboratory, considerable experience or knowledge of stress physiology and$\backslash$or genetics. Interested applicants should submit the following items: 1) a C.V. with competitive GPA and GREs, and also include contact information for 3 references and 2) a 1-2 page description of research interests and responses to qualifications. Applications should be submitted in a single file (pdf, Word) by email to wdw12@psu.edu with the Subject line: GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP. Start Date: 9 January 2017. Salary: Tuition and stipend of about $24k per year that includes summer salary. Closing Date: 15 September 2016. Posted: 8/30/16.

Plymouth State University: Graduate Research Assistantship in Forest Micrometeorology. The Center for the Environment at PSU in NH is inviting applications for a MS graduate research assistantship specifically in the area of forest micrometeorology using an eddy covariance tower at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. The student is expected to take course work to earn a MS in Applied Meteorology. The current research area of interest is in interpretation of energy balance estimates in complex terrain. This project involves synthesizing data from an eddy covariance flux tower, and making ancillary measurements to support energy balance closure. The research will require the student to understand field instrumentation, how to analyze large data sets with open source scripting languages, and the principles around forest energy budgets. Responsibilities: The graduate student will assist with maintaining and analyzing data from the eddy covariance flux tower at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. This includes comparisons of eddy covariance measurements with other instruments at the sites, data management, and possibly satellite derived products. The student will travel monthly to the remote forest site to maintain equipment, deploy experiments, and participate in field data collection. Qualifications: The candidate must have proven abilities to conduct independent research and to work as part of a scientific team. Experience in data analysis, strong quantitative skills and the ability to work in a harsh environment are also required. Experience in or an interest in learning open source scripting languages (e.g., python, R) is also required. A strong background in statistics is desired. Also, an interest in working at the interface of meteorology and forest ecology is desired. The participating degree program for this GRA is the Department of Atmospheric Science & Chemistry (ASC). The annual GRA stipend ($5,331) and tuition support (12 credits) are supported through CFE but the MS degree resides in and is managed by ASC. The student will be co-advised by Eric Kelsey (ekelsey2@plymouth.edu, Meteorology) and Mark Green (mbgreen@plymouth.edu, Hydrology). Applications should be submitted to PSU Graduate Studies. For more information about the MS in Applied Meteorology, please contact Program Coordinator, Eric Hoffman ehoffman@plymouth.edu. Posted: 5/31/17.

Portland State University: The Department of Environmental Science and Policy is inviting applications for 3 MS graduate assistantships. There are 2 Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTA) and 1 Graduate Support Assistantship (GSA) available, all include a stipend of $5,331 and 12 credits of graduate tuition for AY18. The positions are funded for one year with the expectation of continuation to second year. GTAs will assist with undergraduate courses in ESP - preparing and teaching labs, organizing field expeditions, teaching a unit/module, and leading study groups. Some of those courses are Intro to ESP I, Foundations of Environmental Policy, Hydrology, and ESP Seminar. A valid US driver’s license is required. The GSA will be coordinate aspects of the “Forest to Forest: Bicknell’s Thrush” project, supervised by Mary Ann McGarry. The project addresses the complexity of promoting conservation of a migratory bird species that breeds in the high mountains of the Northeast and winters on the island of Hispaniola. The GSA will help organize, implement, evaluate, and archive components of the project activities- including a conference and exhibit taking place over the 2017-’18 academic year. The project is interdisciplinary and multicultural involving English, French, and Spanish speaking communities in multiple countries across two hemispheres. The opportunity exists for the student to pursue an aspect of the topic for his/her MS thesis. GAs are available only to full-time students enrolled in the MS in ESP program. It is beneficial for the applicant to target their application towards a specific faculty and their current research programs. Please submit applications to PSU’s Graduate Studies. For more information about the MS in ESP, contact the MS in ESP Program Coordinator, June Hammond Rowan (jhammondrowan@plymouth.edu). Posted: 5/23/17.

Portland State University: Plant species present unique opportunities and challenges for landscape genetic analyses, as the behavior of their associated biotic and abiotic dispersal vectors as well as the distribution of suitable habitat may affect patterns of genetic variation. Understanding how landscape features may facilitate or limit the dispersal of plants is particularly critical as climate change affects the distribution of suitable habitats. We are looking to recruit graduate students (Ms or PhD) interested the ecological and evolutionary consequences of dispersal. Since direct measures of dispersal do not provide accurate information on historical patterns of dispersal we are employing techniques from population genetics, phylogeography, and ecological genomics. We have already established wet-lab and bioinformatics pipelines for conducting chloroplast genome capture and SNP/haplotype analyses – it is a system just waiting for creative an energetic students to explore the advantages and limitations of these methods. Students will be encouraged to develop their own projects in the context of understanding the processes and consequences of plant dispersal. Experience with laboratory assays and data analyses for genetic markers, GIS analyses, bioinformatics, and field ecological methods would be beneficial but not necessary. This project is funded through an NSF Macrosystems Biology Grant. If interested, please send a letter of introduction to Cruzan@pdx.edu that includes a brief statement of your background and academic record (including GPA and GRE scores if available). Please include an essay outlining your research interests and a recent copy of your CV. Mitch Cruzan, Professor of Biology, Portland State University, Portland, OR. Posted: 11/29/16.

Purdue University: Grad student position to study mycorrhizae and evolutionary game theory (MSc or PhD possible). I am seeking motivated independent graduate students to work on a project examining how plants respond to mycorrhizae as an evolutionary game, and the ecological consequences of these responses. Students should have an interest in field work, and in using mathematical models to develop testable hypotheses for field experiments. More details and how to apply: Gordon McNickle - Plants + Games Lab. Posted: 3/14/17.

Purdue University: PhD and MS Assistantships: Fish and Aquatic Ecology, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. Graduate student (PhD and MS) assistantships available to participate in various research projects exploring dynamics of fish in the Great Lakes and inland systems. These projects involve an integration of field studies, laboratory analyses, controlled experiments and quantitative modeling analyses. Specific research topics include: 1) Linking land-use to population and community structure of fish and invertebrates. 2) Intra-specific variation of life history and trophic traits (e.g., maturation schedules, growth rates, egg characteristics, morphometrics and biochemical trophic indicators) and potential anthropogenic influences on these traits. Selected individuals will enroll in Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources in West Lafayette, IN. Minimum qualifications include a BS (for MS position) or MS (for PhD position) in Biology, Ecology, Fisheries Science, or related field; GPA of 3.2 or greater; and above average GRE scores (at least 50th percentile for quantitative and verbal; at least 4.0 for analytical writing). Assistantships include 12-month stipend, full tuition coverage, and insurance. Exact start date is negotiable (can start sometime from April-August 2017). For full consideration, please respond by 15-December-2016 and submit cover letter, CV, GRE scores (unofficial is fine), transcript (unofficial is fine), and names and contact numbers of three references to Tomas Höök (thook@purdue.edu; 765-496-6799). Posted: 11/14/16.

Purdue University: The Couture lab is accepting applications for graduate positions to study the role of phytochemical diversity on plant-insect interactions and ecosystem functioning in natural and managed systems, including temperate forests, bioenergy poplar, and industrial hemp. Research in my lab focuses on plant and insect chemical ecology at multiple spatial scales. Individuals in my lab receive multidisciplinary training, including plant and insect ecology and physiology, analytical chemistry, and spectroscopy. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest, CV, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to John Couture (couture@purdue.edu). Individuals from groups underrepresented in science are particularly encouraged to apply. Highly qualified applicants will be encouraged to apply to the Department of Entomology before December 1st for entrance fellowships. Posted: 11/14/16.

Purdue University: The Hardiman Lab in the Dept. of Forestry and Natural Resources is recruiting a Ph.D. student, to begin in Fall 2017, to develop a dissertation project that focuses on forest canopy structure and carbon cycling interactions. Research in the Hardiman Lab combines field observations and large-scale ecosystem experiments with remote sensing and ecosystem modeling to investigate relationships between ecosystem structure and function across a gradient of natural to highly-engineered environments within a global change context. Please send an email to bhardima[at]purdue[dot]edu, with information on your interests, classes taken, grades, and GRE scores before December 1st, 2016 to warrant full consideration. To meet both Purdue University and FNR department requirements, candidates must have a minimum GPA of 3.2; GRE scores must be above the 50th percentile on verbal and quantitative sections and above 4.0 on the analytical writing section. Posted: 10/22/16.

Purdue University: Funding is available in the Department of Entomology at Purdue (West Lafayette, Indiana) for a graduate student, either MS or PhD, through a recently funded USDA grant on the consequences of neonicotinoid insecticides for pollinator health, including managed honey bees and wild native bees, in pollinator-dependent crops. See recent press release. Ideal students should be highly enthusiastic and interested in ecology, entomology, and agriculture. Position comes with a competitive stipend, full tuition waiver, and benefits package. Qualifications: Required—BS or MS in biology, ecology, entomology, agriculture, or related discipline. Preferred—field research experience working with pollinators such as bees or insects in general. Starting date: Between January and May 2017. For additional information, see: Graduate studies. Interested individuals should contact Rick Foster, fosterre@purdue.edu, to discuss their background, qualifications, and research interests. Please provide a cover letter, CV (including GPA and GRE scores), and contact information for 3 references. Posted: 10/12/16.

Purdue University: MS/PhD Assistantships Applied Ecology of Urban Landscapes. Research can encompass invasive species, host plant resistance, biological control, tri-trophic interactions and urban forestry. Projects conducted support development of diagnostic mobile apps and decision making tools that promote sustainable design, maintenance and production of plants in urban landscapes. Ideal students should be highly enthusiastic and interested in working at the interface of ecology, entomology, and a plant science discipline (urban forestry, horticulture). Position comes with an annual stipend starting at $20k, full tuition waiver, and benefits package including health insurance. Preferred start date is Spring 2017, although this may be flexible depending on the circumstances (Summer 2017 is a possibility). For additional information visit: Landscape Entomology Lab and Purdue Entomology. Interested individuals should send an email to Cliff Sadof csadof@purdue.edu to discuss their background, qualifications, and research interests. Please provide a cover letter, CV, academic transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial are fine), and contact information for at least 3 references. Posted: 10/11/16.

Purdue University: The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) is seeking outstanding candidates interested in working toward M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. The HTIRC is a collaborative regional research organization of industry, state and federal agencies, and university partners, administratively located in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University. The purpose is to support research in the genetic improvement of high-value North American hardwood tree species. Areas of research include: 1) understanding the etiology of Thousand Cankers Disease of walnut; 2) exploring mechanisms of ash resistance to emerald ash borer (EAB); and 3) chemical ecology of bark and ambrosia beetles affecting native hardwoods. Applicants should be highly motivated and enthusiastic about working in the areas of forest entomology and chemical and behavioral ecology. Candidates should have well-developed quantitative skills, knowledge and experience in the biological sciences, a GPA of at least 3.4 and a top-tier GRE score (above the 60th percentile). Assistantships will be awarded at $18k (M.S.) and $21k (Ph.D.) per year. In addition, an annual budget ($10k) will be available for research support and a laptop computer will be provided for the duration of the scholarship. For admission for fall semester (August 2017), applications must be received by November 15, 2016 (M.S. and Ph.D). Interested individuals should contact me directly via email (mginzel@purdue.edu) to discuss their background, qualifications, and research interests. Posted: 10/11/16.

Purdue University: Plant plasticity and evolutionary game theory (MSc or PhD possible). Fully funded position for 1-2 students with Dr. Gord McNickle in the department of Botany, examining how plants respond to herbivory or mycorrhizae as an evolutionary game, and the ecological consequences of these responses. Students should have an interest in mathematical modelling, and testing those models with experiments in the greenhouse or in the field. Details on the positions and how to apply: http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~gmcnickl/. Screening of informal applications will begin October 15, 2016. Posted: 9/2/16.

Purdue University: I am seeking an M.S. or Ph.D. student for research of the influence of prescribed fire on the quality of residual overstory trees. This work is funded by the Joint Fire Sciences Program and the U.S. Forest Service – Northern Research Station. It will take advantage of existing studies on the Hoosier National Forest, Indiana State Forests, and NSWC-Crane and broaden the scope of existing work to a large portion of Central Hardwood Forest region. Specifically, the incumbent will install a retrospective study of fire damage over 20+ sites in each of the Wayne, Shawnee and Mark Twain National Forests, building on effects begun in the Hoosier this past summer. Relationships between tree grade and lumber grade will be determined by harvesting over 200 trees collect from all sites. In additional, this individual will be partially responsible to maintain a long-term research study on Morgan-Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests and NWSC-Crane. This study follows a variety of trees of differing species and tree grades designated within over 20 burn areas, installs fire monitoring equipment on a subset of individuals when prescribed fires occur, and documents prescribed fire damage to these individuals for several years after each fire. Work will be on remote field sites and in harsh environments typical of southern Indiana, Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. Preference will be given to candidates with strong mensurational skills, tree/lumber grading experience, and fire and/or chainsaw certification. To meet FNR departmental requirements, candidates must have a B.S. or M.S. degree in forestry, wildlife or a closely related field, and a minimum GPA of 3.2; GRE scores must be above the 50th percentile on verbal and quantitative sections and above 4.0 on the analytical writing section. Departmental assistantships are awarded at $19k (M.S.) and $22k (Ph.D.) per year, and include a subsidized insurance plan. This position is for a Spring 2017 (preferred) or Fall 2017 admission. Purdue deadlines for materials for spring admission is September 15, but that deadline can be delayed slightly for qualified candidates. Interested individuals MUST CONTACT Dr. Mike Saunders prior to formally submitting materials: Mike R. Saunders, Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources (FNR), Purdue University. Email: msaunder@purdue.edu; Phone: 765-430-1440. Posted: 8/15/16.

Queen's University: We are recruiting two graduate students (MSc or PhD) to work on the ecology and genetics of adaptation and geographic range limits in flowering plants endemic to the wonderful Pacific coastal dunes of California and adjacent Oregon and Baja California. The students would be co-supervised by Chris Eckert (Queen's U) and Karen Samis (U Prince Edward Island) and based in the Biology Department at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Our research programs provide opportunities for diverse graduate student projects, and PhD students, especially, are encouraged to develop their own research directions. Here are some examples: (1) Using experimental evolution to investigate constraints on adaptation at and beyond geographical range limits. (2) Contribution of hybridization to adaptation across geographic ranges. (3) Does geographic variation in metapopulation dynamics yield stable range limits? (4) Reproductive isolation during diversification of the mating system and life history across species’ ranges. All projects will involve considerable field work in California, Oregon and Mexico, field experiments and genomic analyses. For more details and recent publications, please check out the links above. The Biology Department includes active research groups in plant ecology & evolution, behavioural ecology, molecular population genetics & systematics, paleolimnology, and plant physiology & molecular biology. Graduate students are guaranteed financial support of $22k/year from scholarships, research stipends & teaching assistantships (2 years for an MSc, 4 years for a PhD). The position is open to all students who are Canadian citizens. Acceptance of international students is contingent on successful application for a tuition waiver or independent funding to cover foreign student tuition fees. If you are interested, please send a CV and contact information for at least 2 academic references plus a covering letter. Informal inquiries are also welcome. Dr. Christopher G. Eckert (chris.eckert@queensu.ca) and Dr. Karen Samis (ksamis@upei.ca). Posted: 1/23/17.

Rice University: The Correa Lab has funding to support a graduate student to work on a project assessing the impacts of viruses on coral reefs in Moorea, French Polynesia. The scope of this project includes observational and experimental fieldwork, molecular lab work, algal culturing, and bioinformatic analyses. Preferred applicants may have experience in many/all of these areas, as well as a research diving certification or extensive diving experience. Applications from underrepresented groups are encouraged. Interested candidates should email Dr. Adrienne Correa with a brief description of their qualifications and interest in our lab’s research, as well as their CV. The application deadline for the Rice EEB graduate program is December 31st, 2016. Posted: 11/15/16.

South Dakota State University: The Ahiablame lab and the Perkins lab are looking for a motivated MS student to measure soil and hydrological recovery after disturbance (wildfire and severe winter defoliation) in Northern Plains grasslands. Our ideal student would have some soils background as well as an interest in hydrological modeling. Start date is flexible, but could be as early as this summer. This project is funded by USDA-NIFA and the field research will occur at the Cottonwood Range and Livestock Research Station by Philip, South Dakota. For more information, please contact Dr. Perkins at lora.perkins@sdstate.edu or Dr. Ahiablame at laurent.ahiablame@sdstate.edu. For consideration please send 1) a cover letter explaining your interest in this position, 2) transcripts (unofficial are ok), 3) GRE scores (unofficial are ok), and 4) contact info for 3 references to Dr. Perkins by April 15, 2017. Posted: 3/20/17.

South Dakota State University: The Department of Natural Resource Management invites applications for a Ph.D. Assistantship to evaluate the effects of landscape composition and habitat configuration on ring-necked pheasant ecology. The graduate research assistant will have the opportunity to collaborate with SDSU and BGSU faculty and South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks biologists to study the effects of landscape-scale habitat characteristics and other environmental factors pheasant population viability and space use patterns. This study is part of a broader, long-term research effort to understand the effect of ongoing land use and land cover changes on ring-necked pheasant populations in the region. The Ph.D. student will also have the flexibility to pursue independent research interests related to this topic. Qualifications: Academic requirements include a Master’s degree in a closely related field (except in exceptional circumstances), strong GRE scores, and GPA above 3.0. Candidates must have strong spatial analysis, and writing skills. The preferred candidate should have previous experience with radio telemetry and GPS tracking of wildlife, avian capture, working with a diverse team of collaborators, geographic information systems, and statistical modeling in R and MARK. Additionally, candidates must have a strong work ethic, with the ability to work independently and as part of a larger team, and must be willing and able to conduct field work in extreme weather conditions. Financial support: Approximately $21k for a 12-month stipend plus a full tuition waiver. Start Date: Expected start date is August 2017, with the possibility of participating in fieldwork starting in May 2017. To Apply: To be considered for this opportunity, please forward a cover letter, CV, a copy of transcripts (unofficial), and a list of three references with contact information to Dr. Michael Wimberly at michael.wimberly@sdstate.edu and Dr. Andy Gregory at agregor@bgsu.edu. Incomplete applications will not be considered. For full consideration, please submit your application materials by January 31, 2017. For additional information contact: Dr. Michael C. Wimberly, Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence, Department of Natural Resource Management, South Dakota State University, Phone: 605-688-5350; Email: michael.wimberly@sdstate.edu. Dr. Andrew J. Gregory, School of Earth, Environment and Society, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403-0001, Phone: 1-419-372-9369; Email: agregor@bgsu.edu. Posted: 12/13/16.

South Dakota State University: An assistantship (MS or PhD) is available in the Department of Natural Resource Management for the examination of the distribution, plant up-take, and environmental impact of neonicotinoids in USFWS grasslands. The environmental impacts that we are most focused on include native pollinators and butterflies. The student will work closely with Lora Perkins (SDSU), Jon Lundgren (Blue Dasher Farm), Josh Stafford (USGS), and Kyle Kelsey (USFWS). The successful applicant should have a BS or MS in a relevant field of study, some GIS skills, and the ability to work with an interdisciplinary team. To apply please send a cover letter describing yourself and your interest in grad school and this project, GRE scores, and transcripts (unofficial are fine) to lora.perkins@sdstate.edu. For full consideration, have your materials in by December 16, 2016. Students that are non-traditional or are from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM are encouraged to apply. For more information, please contact Dr. Perkins at lora.perkins@sdstate.edu, Dr. Lundgren at jgl.entomology@gmail.com, or Dr. Stafford at Joshua.stafford@sdstate.edu. Posted: 11/17/16.

South Dakota State University: An assistantship (PhD) is available in the Department of Natural Resource Management for the examination of the distribution and impact of the invasive tree Elaeagnus angustifolia in the northern Great Plains. Although understanding the distribution of this invasive riparian tree is a project requirement, the focus of study on ecological impacts has some flexibility- options include soil nutrients and microbial community, pollinators, birds, and mammals. The student will have the opportunity for spatial modeling, field observations/experiments, and greenhouse/laboratory experiments. The student will be advised by Dr. Lora Perkins with additional mentoring from Dr. Erin Espeland (USDA-ARS). The successful applicant should have a BS or MS in a relevant field of study, some GIS skills, and interest in biological invasions. To apply please send a cover letter describing yourself and your interest in grad school and this project, GRE scores, and transcripts (unofficial are fine) to lora.perkins@sdstate.edu. For full consideration, have your materials in by December 9, 2016. Students that are non-traditional or are from groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM are encouraged to apply. If you would like more information, please ask! Posted: 11/16/16.

South Dakota State University: Arctic Systems Ecology. Two MS research assistant positions are available (Jan. 2017) in the Leffler Lab of the Department of Natural Resource Management for students interested climate change, plant ecology, plant-animal interactions, or range ecology of the far north. Students will participate in a NSF-funded multidisciplinary project examining the future of caribou forage in northern Alaska. All research will be based at Toolik Lake LTER in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range. Students will examine how a long-term climate change experiment has altered the quantity and quality of forage for arctic caribou and how vegetation quantity and quality varies on the North Slope of Alaska. This is an opportunity to get involved with a large-scale project that include ecologists, remote-sensing specialists, snow hydrologists, ecosystem modelers, and others interested in human/caribou relationships. I seek students with strong backgrounds in ecology, quantitative skills, and a willingness to work in remote Alaska. Experience with plant identification, vegetation sampling techniques, dataloggers, and data manipulation/analysis using R is desired. Students must commit to three field seasons (ca. late-May to mid-August) in Alaska. The MS assistantships include a stipend of ca. $17k/year, tuition waiver, and room and board at Toolik during summer. The Department of Natural Resource Management combines Range, Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology within the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences. To apply, send a single PDF with CV; unofficial transcripts; a letter describing your experience, research interests, and career goals; and contact information for three professional references to Josh Leffler (joshua.leffler@sdstate.edu). Posted: 8/30/16.

South Dakota State University: One PhD Research/Teaching Assistantship is anticipated beginning in fall 2016 or at the successful incumbent’s earliest availability. The project will include examination of neonicotinoid exposure on USFWS grasslands and a risk assessment for rare and endangered butterflies. The co-PIs on this research project are Jon Lundgren, Lora Perkins, and Josh Stafford from South Dakota State University and Kyle Kelsey with the USFWS. Research will primarily consist of field studies and laboratory work. The incumbent will have the opportunity to build collaborations among government, non-governmental agencies, and academia. Qualifications: Students must have a B.S. in ecology, environmental science, wildlife science, entomology, natural resource conservation, or closely related discipline and a M.S is preferred. In the application materials, please describe your: background in grassland ecology; ability to identify prairie plants and insect communities, and; ability to conduct laboratory assays for detecting insecticides (e.g., ELISA). The applicant should possess the ability to work with a diversity of natural resource professionals, including federal agencies and non-government organizations. Strong communication and collaborative skills are necessary, considering the multiple entities involved with this project. The 12-month stipend includes full tuition remission and is guaranteed for 4 years as long as annual reviews demonstrate adequate progress. To apply, applicants should create a single document containing 1) a cover letter that includes a description of work experience and career goals, 2) resume, and 3) the names and contact information of 3 references (phone and e-mail address); copies of transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial are acceptable at this time) are also required. GPA of 3.0 or above and GRE score of 1100 (v + q or New scores: 156 V and 151 Q) is preferred. Please send application materials or questions electronically to the following: Dr. Joshua D. Stafford, joshua.stafford@sdstate.edu 605-688-5759; Dr. Lora Perkins, lora.perkins@sdstate.edu 605-688-6970; Dr. Jonathan Lundgren, jgl.entomology@gmail.com 605-695-9878. Posted: 7/18/16.

Southern Cross University: The Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry at SCU (Lismore, Australia) is offering a PhD scholarship on Seagrass denitrification. Seagrass habitats are “hotspots” of biogeochemical cycling due to large amounts of organic matter produced by high rates of in situ primary productivity and associated respiration, and because they trap large amounts of externally generated organic matter (e.g. phyto-detritus). In sediments where the overlying water is well-oxygenated with low nitrate, typical of seagrass habitats, the supply of labile carbon is the most important controlling factor on denitrification. Despite a supply of organic matter, earlier measurements in temperate seagrass communities found low rates of denitrification. The low rates of denitrification were thought to be due to coupled nitrification-denitrification in the rhizosphere of temperate seagrass communities being suppressed due to competition for N resources between nitrifying bacteria and seagrass and benthic microalgae. However, we recently measured much higher rates of denitrification in (sub)tropical seagrass communities than have previously been reported for temperate seagrass communities (Eyre et al., 2011 Biogeochemistry 102, 111-133; Eyre et al., 2013. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 27, 1-13; Eyre et al., 2016. L&O 61, 1144-1156). This study is designed to test the hypothesis that previous differences in seagrass denitrification rates are due to either (1) different rates of biogeochemical processes, which may, in part be driven by species differences and/ or (2) different methodologies used to measure rates of denitrification. As such, this work will use three different denitrification techniques (N2:Ar, isotope pairing, NO3 microsensor) and N-fixation, N2O, anammox and DNRA measurements in different seagrass communities in Australia and Denmark. This project involves collaboration with Prof. Ronnie Glud at the University of Southern Denmark and there may be opportunity to undertake field work in Denmark. Applicants will need to have a 1st Class Honours or Master degree in English in a related field such as biogeochemistry, environmental chemistry, or closely related. Previous research experience with benthic process measurements (cores and/or benthic chambers), seagrasses and/or aquatic nitrogen cycling will be viewed favourably. The projects will involve extended periods in the field, including in small boats, and previous small boat experience will be advantageous. Interested applicants should send their CV, and a short letter highlighting their research background to: Prof. Bradley Eyre (Bradley.eyre@scu.edu.au). Only short-listed applicants will be notified. Closing date October 15 2016. Starting date, by January 30 2017. The scholarship currently valued at $25k is open to both Australian and international applicants and is tax free. Tuition fees will be waived. Posted: 9/29/16.

Southern Illinois University: We are seeking a PhD student to conduct a study testing how changes in animal physiology and foraging behavior feedback to affect plant community assembly and diversity. The research will focus on kangaroo rats and their grassland communities in New Mexico, and will include the use of digital telemetry, stable isotopes, and endocrine stress physiology. The student will work with both Dr. Robin Warne and Dr. Justin Boyles in the Zoology Department. An M.S. degree or comparable experience in either physiological, behavioral, or community ecology research of small rodents is highly preferred. Technical skills with either coding (for analysis of telemetry data) or lab analyses (for endocrine assays and stable isotope analysis) are useful, but not required. Our labs are highly research active, and we collectively maintain a strong and diverse cohort of undergraduate and graduate researchers. For inquiries or to apply, please send a cover letter and CV to Dr. Robin Warne (rwarne@siu.edu). Posted: 1/31/17.

Southern Illinois University: The Warne lab for animal physiological ecology in the Zoology Department is seeking a PhD student. We explore how vertebrates (1) maintain homeostasis while coping with environmental variation; (2) how these interactions influence resource allocation to life history processes such as development, growth, and reproduction; (3) as well as disease dynamics. A major focus for this PhD project is aimed at exploring how the symbiotic gut microbiome influences host life history processes, physiological performance, and disease susceptibility. Potential projects will integrate stable isotope methods with microbiological approaches. A M.S. degree or comparable experience in biological research is highly preferred. For competitive students, university fellowships are available, including the Morris Doctoral Fellowships that provides a 12-month salary for 3-years, plus research funding. Further inquiries and applications including a cover letter and CV can be sent to Dr. Robin Warne (rwarne@siu.edu). Posted: 11/8/16.

SUNY-ESF: I (John Stella) am soliciting applications from interested candidates for a Masters graduate research position that links landscape analysis, geospatial modeling, and riparian forest ecology (starting Summer 2017). For details see opportunities in the Stella Lab. Applications are due January 15, with rolling admissions afterwards. Posted: 1/11/17.

SUNY-ESF: I (John Stella) am soliciting applications from interested candidates for a PhD graduate research position funded by an NSF project that links riparian forest ecology, tree ecophysiology, groundwater hydrology and remote sensing (starting Summer 2017). For details see opportunities in the Stella Lab. Applications are due January 15, with rolling admissions afterwards. Posted: 1/11/17.

Stephen F. Austin State University: The Department of Biology at SFA has openings for graduate students interested in pursuing thesis-based Master’s of Science degrees in either Biology or Biotechnology. Facilities within the department include a greenhouse and herbarium, an animal care facility, and entomology and vertebrate collections. Equipment available to support research includes an electron microscope facility, a molecular core facility, and a fleet of trucks and boats. Collaborations with researchers representing other departments, universities, or state and federal agencies are a regular part of our culture. Faculty expertise in the department ranges from the subcellular to the landscape level. Graduate students are eligible for Teaching Assistantships that provide a stipend of $11,500 for a 9-month contract, with the option for additional summer salary. For extremely competitive students, a limited number of Research Assistantships are available that offer higher stipends and associated research funds. Applications are currently being accepted. For more information about the M.S. degrees available through the Dept. of Biology, please contact Dr. Matthew Kwiatkowski (kwiatkowm@sfasu.edu). Posted: 9/23/16.

Stony Brook University/Brookhaven National Laboratory: The Terrestrial Ecosystem Science & Technology (TEST) group is currently recruiting Ph.D. students with an interest in one or more of the following areas: - Remote sensing - Modeling tropical carbon cycle processes - Plant physiology - Conducting field work in the tropics. A degree in the life sciences is required, preferably in plant biology, ecology or remote sensing. Candidates with an interest in the measurement and model representation of plant structural and functional traits and model-data fusion are strongly encouraged to apply. Students will be supervised by Dr. Shawn Serbin (sserbin@bnl.gov) and have the opportunity to structure their thesis research around a growing portfolio of research within the TEST group. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to conduct research in a diverse range of field sites spanning paleotropical and neotropical ecosystems. Financial support is available through a combination of research grants, graduate fellowships, and teaching opportunities. Please send CV and cover letter describing research interests to Dr. Shawn Serbin. The deadline for applicants to the Ecology & Evolution doctoral program is December 1st 2016. Information on open positions in the TEST group. Posted: 10/13/16.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: I have a vacancy for a PhD-student position on Management of weed-seed predation at SLU in Uppsala, Sweden. Deadline for applications is 10 May. More info here. Mattias Jonsson (mattias.jonsson@slu.se). Posted: 5/1/17.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: We are seeking candidates for two PhD student positions in Ecology at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala. 1) Greener infrastructure: Management of linear infrastructure rights-of-way for biodiversity and landscape connectivity. 2) Effects of wetland restoration on bird diversity - a landscape approach. Deadline: 2017-02-27. Posted: 2/8/17.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Stockholm University: three exciting PhD positions in ecohydrology/biogeochemical modelling in the Uppsala/Stockholm (Sweden) area: PhD project 1 (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Uppsala) Modelling climate-related risks and vulnerability to climate change of agricultural systems (Biology with specialization in Ecology, SLU ua 163/2017) More information and application instructions at the link above. Deadline: February 28th, 2017; contact person: Giulia Vico giulia.vico@slu.se. PhD project 2 (Stockholm University) Physical Geography with a focus on ecohydrology of agro-ecosystems, connected with the project “Quantifying the trade-offs between ecosystem service provision and water management in rice systems” (VR/Formas/SIDA) More information and instructions for applications at the link above. Deadline: February 15th, 2017; contact person; Stefano Manzoni stefano.manzoni@natgeo.su.se ). PhD project 3 (Stockholm University): Physical Geography with a focus on biogeochemical modelling, connected to the VR project “Scaling up soil carbon dynamics from microbial cells to ecosystems for next-generation Earth System models” More information and application instructions at the link above. Deadline: February 15th, 2017; contact person; Stefano Manzoni stefano.manzoni@natgeo.su.se ). Posted: 1/26/17.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: 1 PhD student on the "Ecology of crop protection against insect pests in agriculture". The successful applicant will enter a dynamic and internationally distinguished research environment (Riccardo Bommarco, Ecosystem services and Conservation Research Team), and will explore the ecology underpinning population regulation and dynamics of interacting damaging and beneficial arthropods in agricultural landscapes, and based on this, develop, test and promote sustainable pest control practices as part of IPM in major crops in Sweden. Qualifications: Applicants should have a Master's degree (or equivalent) in biology, agronomy, environmental science or similar subjects with specialization in ecology, and should be interested in population ecology and developing applications based on ecological understanding and experimentation. Submit your application to registrator@slu.se by 20 October 2016, carefully following the linked instructions. Applicants are expected to provide (i) a motivation letter, (ii) CV, (iii) certified copies of degree certificates, (iv) copy of a dissertation at second-cycle level, corresponding at least 15 HEC,, (v) if the applicant is a foreign citizen, a certified copy of the passport must be attached and (vi) a list of referees and their contact information. Start date: Negotiable, but 1 February 2017 at the latest. For further information contact: Prof. Riccardo Bommarco (Riccardo.Bommarco@slu.se). Posted: 9/26/16.

Syracuse University: Seeking a PhD or MS student interested in studying the functional dynamics of grazed grassland. The objective of this funded study is to understand the direct and indirect effects of grazing ungulates on grassland plant and soil processes. Students with interests or experience in plant-soil relations, grassland functional ecology, or biogeochemistry are particularly encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will join a diverse plant ecology and evolution group at Syracuse University and a larger ecological community that includes SUNY-College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Prospective students should contact Doug Frank (dafrank@syr.edu) and include a CV and statement of interest. Applications to the SU Biology Graduate Program are due by Dec 31. Posted: 9/13/16.

Technische Universität München: PhD Position: Rhizosphere as driver of subsoil organic matter dynamics. Root-derived organic carbon is a major source for the formation of soil organic matter. Roots provide carbon input via root litter and rhizdeposition and, therefore, play a key role in soil biogeochemical cycles. This is evidenced in the development of a soil-specific structure with emergent properties during pedogenesis. The main objective of the project is to better understand the influence of growing roots and their associated microbiome on the composition, distribution and the amount of soil organic carbon within the sub-soil and specifically in the subsoil rhizosphere. The project is part of the DFG research unit FOR 1806 – “The forgotten part of carbon cycling: Organic matter storage and turnover in subsoils (SUBSOM)”. We seek a highly motivated candidate to work with us on a cascade of experiments with advanced complexity, using established state of the art methods (e.g. NMR spectroscopy, NanoSIMS). In addition we want to go a step beyond and develop new techniques to better understand the role of the rhizosphere for subsoil organic carbon dynamics. The Soil Science Group at TUM offers a vibrant academic environment with well-equipped facilities located nearby Munich in southern Germany. Applicants should have the ability to work self-organized and in a team, have excellent management and communication skills and should be highly motivated and committed to pursuing interdisciplinary research. Good computer and language skills (English) are necessary. The candidate will have the opportunity to present her/his results in international journals and conferences. The successful candidate should hold a MSc degree (or equivalent) in biology, geo-ecology, agriculture, forestry, geology or related natural sciences and have sound knowledge of soil science. Candidates with experience in microscopic techniques, scanning and/or transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), or in plant physiology as well as microbiology are highly welcome. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for three years and provides a salary of 65 % of German TVL E13 (approx. EUR 1400 per month/net) scheme together with health and social security benefits. The starting date is 01.01.2017, or a later date to be decided upon. A single pdf-file including letter of motivation, research experience, CV, and publication list should be sent by email to PD. Dr. Carsten W. Mueller (bodenkunde@wzw.tum.de). Application deadline is 20.10.2016. Posted: 9/28/16.

Temple University: The Cordes lab is looking for a new Ph.D. student to examine the community ecology of cold-seep communities along the Pacific margin of Costa Rica. This is part of a new, collaborative, NSF-funded project to examine the physical, chemical, and biological linkages between seeps and the wider deep-sea ecosystem. Specifically, the Cordes lab is responsible for the analysis of quantitative collections of the tubeworm and mussel associated communities at the seeps and their analysis within the geographic and chemical framework developed by our collaborators. This work will involve training in community ecology, multivariate statistics, genetic and morphological taxonomy, and GIS. The student will participate in field work and develop their own ideas for their dissertation work within the larger collaborative effort. There are also additional opportunities to expand this research to other ecosystems. The Cordes lab is focused on the ecology of deep-sea habitats including deep-sea corals, cold seeps, and hydrothermal vents. We are interested in how organisms shape their environment by creating habitat heterogeneity and altering biogeochemical cycles on the seafloor. These interests touch on ecosystem level processes, patterns of community assembly, population dynamics, individual habitat preference, physiological responses to changing environments, and the genetic regulation of metabolic processes. We are also interested in the conservation of deep water habitats, and the lab has been actively investigating the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on deepwater coral communities, as well as monitoring ongoing ocean acidification in the deep Gulf of Mexico. Integrating research across these disciplines has led to the development of a wide variety of capabilities in the lab as well as a large network of national and international collaborators. Current projects in the lab include investigations of the deep-sea corals and seeps of the Gulf of Mexico, exploration of the seamounts of the Phoenix Islands, and the project described above. Potential PhD students should send their CV, transcripts, GRE scores, and a brief statement of research interests related to this project to ecordes@temple.edu. Formal applications to the Biology Department should be complete by January 1 to qualify for internal Fellowships. Posted: 10/11/16.

Temple University: A PhD Graduate student position with Dr. Matthew Helmus is available at the Center for Biodiversity for Fall 2017. Dr. Helmus runs a joint lab in the Center with Dr. Jocelyn Behm that is focused on integrating biodiversity science with human ecology to understand contemporary patterns of biodiversity and its functioning within ecosystems. The PhD student will research the drivers of past and present patterns of amphibian and reptile functional island biogeography. Activities performed may include: - functional trait measurement - data mining (literature and museum specimens) - genetic sequencing - Caribbean field work - mentoring undergraduate research assistants - quantitative method development. Applicants must have prior research experience and a bachelor’s and/or master’s degree in biology, environmental science, or other quantitative field. Ideal applicants are those with experience in ecology, macroevolution, statistics, and/or herpetology; but most importantly, the successful applicant will be well-organized, able to work both independently and in a team setting, and motivated to learn. This position is ideal for those craving a career in the exciting, fast-paced world of biodiversity science. Full applications are due to Temple’s Graduate School on December 15 (November 15 for international applicants). However, interested applicants should initially contact Dr. Helmus (mrhelmus@temple.edu) well in advance of the deadline. Include in this initial contact your CV, unofficial transcript, and a brief statement of interest that describes your relevant background experiences, why you are interested in the position, and questions you have about the research, etc. Applicants are strongly encouraged to first peruse the lab website and publications prior to contact. Posted: 8/23/16.

Texas A&M University: Openings for two PhD positions are anticipated to study molecular ecology and phylogenomics of social insects and possibly other urban arthropod pests in the laboratory of Ed Vargo in the Department of Entomology. The Vargo lab is a dynamic research group housed in the Rollins Urban and Structural Facility, a state of the art research and training facility. Our research focuses on population genetics and colony breeding structure of urban insect pests, primarily termites and ants. Research topics in the lab include the invasion biology of termites, ants, bed bugs and cockroaches using phylogenomic approaches, causes and consequences of colony breeding structure in ants and termites, the genetic and behavioral basis of disease immunity in social insects, and management of urban pests. Students will develop specific research projects based on their interests and aptitudes that fit within the research areas explored by the lab. Candidates should have some background in molecular ecology and/or entomology with an interest in one or more of the following areas: population genetics, genomics/bioinformatics, invasion biology and behavioral ecology. The Department of Entomology is one of the leading entomology departments in the U.S. and offers outstanding graduate training, excellent facilities and competitive stipends. In addition Ed Vargo is a faculty member in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology interdisciplinary doctoral program consisting of faculty, postdocs and students across campus. Pursuing a degree in the EEB program is an option. Interested applicants should send a C.V., a brief statement about research interests, (unofficial) transcripts, GRE scores and contact information for three references to ed.vargo@tamu.edu. Starting date is Summer 2017. Posted: 12/15/16.

Texas A&M University: The Grace lab is seeking applications from motivated and independent students who wish to pursue a PhD related to avian ecophysiology. Our lab utilizes behavioral, physiological, and ecological tools to investigate how animals respond to environmental changes within their lifetime, at the proximate and ultimate levels. We focus on avian species and applicants interested in working with wetland birds will be given priority. The successful applicant will develop her or his own research project within the general umbrella of the lab, and interested students should consult Dr. Grace’s website for more information on recent research. Successful applicants will be expected to generate and design research projects in collaboration with other researchers, conduct field work in variable weather conditions, work as an active and enthusiastic member of a research group, and be able to take initiative and work independently. Competitive applicants will have strong quantitative and writing skills, and prior experience with field research, preferably with birds. See Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences graduate training program. Students may also consider enrolling in the interdisciplinary Ecology and Evolutionary Biology program. Interested applicants should send an email to Dr. Jacquelyn Grace (jkgrace at tamu.edu ) including a CV, unofficial transcript, GRE scores (if available) and a written statement describing your background, research interests in relation to our lab, previous research experience, and long-term goals. Please contact Jacquelyn as soon as possible to ensure that you receive full consideration for fellowships. Posted: 10/27/16.

Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi: An Environmental Science or Chemistry MS opportunity is available with the Felix Research Group in the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences. The potential student’s research will focus on investigating the spatial and temporal variations of ethanol concentrations in wet deposition in the Eastern U.S. as part of a collaboration with the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network. Knowledge of current atmospheric ethanol concentrations and their temporal trends is vital as the nation prepares to more than double renewable fuel production. Potential students should be highly self-motivated and have a strong background in chemistry with extensive laboratory experience. Gas chromatography experience is preferred. The position will be supported by teaching and research assistantships. The student will matriculate through the Environmental Science MS program or the chemistry MS program. Interested candidates should contact Dr. J. David Felix (joseph.felix@tamucc.edu) and provide a short statement of interest and CV. More information about the Felix Research Group and potential research can be found here felixlab.tamucc.edu. Posted: 5/5/17.

Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi: A graduate opportunity is available in the lab of Dr. Christopher J. Patrick for prospective Ph.D. student wishing to pursue topics in quantitative community and spatial ecology. In particular, the student is being recruited to work on questions related to factors that drive community assembly and ecosystem processes across spatial scales. South Texas has a wealth of aquatic ecosystems and some very strong environmental gradients including one of the steepest precipitation gradients in North America transitioning from arid-lands to humid environments, and a strong connection between marine and freshwater ecosystems. This provides a number of options for student research projects including topics related to climate change, desert stream ecology, effects of hydrologic alteration on stream communities, downstream effects on estuaries, and connections between marine and freshwater food webs. The Patrick Lab regularly combines field work, experiments, geospatial analysis, and statistical modeling with large datasets in our research. Interested students should preferably hold either a M.S. degree in ecology or a related field, or a B.S. degree with at least 2 years of research experience and evidence of strong writing and presentation skills. Prior experience in field ecology, statistical analysis, computer coding (R, Python), and spatial analysis (ArcGIS, other) is preferred but not required. The successful applicant will enroll in the MARB graduate program which is a joint degree program shared by TAMU, TAMU-Corpus Christi, and TAMUC-Galveston. Funding for stipend and health benefits will be provided through a mix of graduate research and teaching assistantships. Fellowships opportunities are also available through the MARB program and graduate school programs. Graduate student stipend is generous relative to the low cost of living and recreational and research opportunities abound in the coastal ecosystems near the waterfront campus. Interested students should send a CV, unofficial transcript, and cover letter describing your prior experience, potential research interests, and career goals to Dr. Christopher Patrick at Christopher.Patrick@tamucc.edu. Posted: 11/10/16.

Texas Tech University: The Olson lab is recruiting PhD Graduate students interested in the field of plant ecological genetics to start in spring, summer or fall of of 2017. Funds are available for partial support on a Graduate Research Associate on an NSF-funded grant to study the ecological and genetic factors influencing reproductive success and the dynamic movement of sex determination regions within the Salicaceae (poplars and willows). The overall project focuses on understanding the genetic basis of gender dimorphism in defense and pollinator attraction chemistry, mapping sex determination regions from representatives Populus and Salix species, and the assessment of population genetic patterns across the sex determination and pseudo-autosomal regions of the sex chromosomes. Graduate students working on this project will have the opportunity to choose from a variety of projects including, but not limited to, mapping the locations of previously unknown sex determination regions, development of phylogenies for important plant groups, and studying the ecology and evolution of sexual dimorphism in plant defensive and pollinator attraction compounds. Moreover, the grant provides for a unique multi-institutional and international training environment, with potential funding to visit labs at the University of West Virginia, the University of Wisconsin, Cornell University, and Sichuan University and Nanjing Forestry University in China for cross-disciplinary training. In general, the Olson lab studies a variety of questions including the evolution of breeding systems, sex chromosome evolution, the evolution of gender dimorphism in plants, and local adaptation to latitude in relation to climate change. We use a variety of experimental techniques including common garden studies, field ecology, transmission genetics, genomics and bioinformatics. For the past decade we have studied these processes in forest trees and expect that this will continue to be the main taxonomic focus of our research. The Olson lab is part of a dynamic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology group at Texas Tech. Courses and focused training in ecology, bioinformatics, and genomics are available from a highly interactive faculty. Texas Tech boasts excellent laboratory and research resources as well as easy access to some of the most beautiful and remote regions of the lower 48 US. Please contact Matt Olson directly at matt.olson@ttu.edu for more information. Posted: 12/23/16.

Texas Tech University: Ph.D. & M.S. opportunities in landscape ecology. I am seeking graduate students to join my lab who are interested in landscape ecology pertaining to potential climate and land-use change impacts on wetlands and associated fauna (particularly odonates [dragonflies and damselflies]). Preference will be given to students with previous experience in GIS or remote sensing, and to Ph.D. students who already have a Master’s degree. Prospective students will be funded (upon qualification) by a 9-month/year departmental Teaching Assistantship and possibly by applicable graduate school fellowships (awards ranging from $2500 for 1 year to $30k/yr for 3 years). To apply, please send your Curriculum Vitae, which should include all of the following items: · a statement about your research interests and how they are compatible with the kinds of research that I do · a statement about your career goals · GRE scores · a brief list of your academic and professional accomplishments (degrees, GPA, awards, fellowships, publications, grants, presentations at professional meetings, jobs, etc.) · the names, addresses, phone numbers, and email addresses of 3 references · students from outside the U.S. must also include TOEFL scores (Test of English as a Foreign Language), if appropriate. See more information for international students, and more information for U.S. citizens. Funds are available to bring prospective students in for a campus visit. Application deadline: 1 December 2016. Nancy McIntyre, Ph.D., Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-3131 USA. 806-834-7977, nancy.mcintyre@ttu.edu. Posted: 10/12/16.

Texas Tech University: The Griffis-Kyle lab invites applications for a funded MS position in Small Mammal Ecology and Climate Change. We welcome inquiries from motivated students interested in working with long term data sets, small mammal ecology, and climate change. Students will be expected to help with undergraduate lab classes. The graduate position is funded for $16.5K/year with a tuition waiver and opportunities for additional fellowships. Support is guaranteed for 2 years, with additional years of support possible. The Griffis-Kyle lab encourages applications from everyone, including gender and other minorities. TTU is one of four major state supported universities in Texas and is designated as an emerging research university by the State of Texas. The University is a member of the South-Central Climate Science Consortium. Qualifications: We are looking for a highly motivated and creative individual with good communication skills (oral and written). Preference will be given to students with previous experience trapping small mammals, competitive GRE scores, and undergrad GPA > 3.0. Interested applicants should email Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle (kerry.griffis-kyle@ttu.edu) and have “MS opportunity” in the subject line. Please include in the email: 1. How this position will help you fulfill your career goals and desired start date 2. Why I should hire you 3. Resume or CV including pertinent work experience and address, phone, and email 4. Unofficial transcripts 5. GRE scores 6. Contact information for three references. Additional information on the Graduate Program. Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle, Associate Professor, Wetland Ecology, Box 42125, Department of Natural Resources Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 79409. Posted: 9/14/16.

Texas Tech University: The Griffis-Kyle lab invites applications for a funded PhD position in Wetland Ecology. Start date negotiable for 2017. We welcome inquiries from motivated students interested in wildlife use of wetlands and how climate change will influence these interactions. Preference will be given to students interested in wetland amphibians or invertebrates although other interests will certainly be considered. Students will conduct at least part of their work based in Waco Texas. The graduate position is funded at a TA at $18K/year with a tuition waiver and opportunities for additional fellowships. Support is guaranteed for 4 years, with additional years of support possible. The Griffis-Kyle lab encourages applications from everyone, including gender and other minorities. TTU is one of four major state supported universities in Texas and is designated as an emerging research university by the State of Texas. The University is a member of the South-Central Climate Science Consortium. Qualifications: We are looking for a highly motivated and creative student with good communication skills (oral and written). Students should be interested in collaborating with a community college and mentoring undergraduates in research. A M.S. degree is required for consideration. Preference will be given to students with previous experience working with amphibians or freshwater invertebrates, competitive GRE scores, undergrad GPA (>3.0), and grad GPA (>3.5). Interested applicants should email Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle (kerry.griffis-kyle@ttu.edu) and have “PhD opportunity” in the subject line. Please include in the email: 1. How this position will help you fulfill your career goals and desired start date 2. Why I should hire you 3. Resume or CV including pertinent work experience and address, phone, and email 4. Unofficial transcripts 5. GRE scores 6. Contact information for three references. Additional information on the Graduate Program. Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle, Associate Professor, Wetland Ecology, Box 42125, Department of Natural Resources Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 79409. Posted: 9/14/16.

Trent University: Graduate positions are available to contribute to on-going ecological research on lakes and rivers in the Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario. Research for these positions could range from foodweb responses to environmental stress to landscape studies of carbon and nutrients. Field work for these positions could include the Great Lakes basin, central Ontario in cottage country and the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario. These graduate positions will be based at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario as part of the Environmental and Life Sciences Graduate Program and beginning in 2017 (Winter, Summer, or Fall). Interested students should contact Dr. Paul Frost (paulfrost@trentu.ca) and/or Dr. Maggie Xenopoulos (mxenopoulos@trentu.ca) with a brief statement of interests and a recently updated resume. Posted: 11/15/16.

Tulane University: The Karubian Lab is seeking applications from prospective PhD students interested in tropical rainforest evolutionary ecology and conservation, with a focus on palm trees in Ecuador. Students will be encouraged to develop independent research that combines fieldwork on ecological processes (e.g., dispersal, competition, survival) with laboratory-based genetic approach (e.g., population genetics / genomics, transcriptomics) to better understand the forces that regulate patterns of diversity within and among species. In doing so, students will build upon previous and ongoing NSF-funded work in the Karubian lab that links behavior of dispersal agents to seed and pollen movement; characterizes ecological and genetic drivers of non-random seedling survival; and documents how naturally occurring environmental variation interacts with human activities to shape patterns of diversity. The Karubian lab has a strong commitment to linking our research to real world conservation outcomes via meaningful engagement with local communities in the areas where we work. Incoming students are encouraged to participate in and contribute to this effort. Ability to speak Spanish or willingness to learn is also a plus. The Karubian lab is based at the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane University, in New Orleans LA. We have an outstanding and supportive group of students and faculty. Ph.D. students in good standing receive TA-ships that cover stipend and tuition costs during their time at Tulane. Competitive fellowships and in-house research support are also available. The deadline for applying is January 15, 2017. Prior to applying, interested students should contact Dr. Jordan Karubian (jk@tulane.edu) with a statement of interest and CV. Students from Latin America and from under-represented groups in ecology and evolution are particularly encouraged to apply. Posted: 12/23/16.

Tulane University: The Farrer lab is recruiting Ph.D. students to study plant-microbe interactions, invasive species, and global change. Specific research projects are flexible and dependent on the student’s interest. The Farrer lab examines the interactions that structure plant and microbial communities in space and time, and how global change alters these interactions with consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem function. We work in wetlands, grasslands, and alpine ecosystems. Current work in the lab is focused on understanding how microbes are key intermediaries in how plants respond to climate change. Climate change alters microbial communities, shifting abundances of mutualistic and parasitic microbial taxa, which can influence plant composition and diversity. The lab is starting up work in coastal wetlands, investigating how saltwater intrusion and sea level rise will influence communities in the Gulf Coast. Support is available from a combination of Teaching Assistantships and Research Assistantships, and students are encouraged to apply for their own fellowships through NSF or other agencies. The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology has two fellowships available for students from underrepresented minorities and any such applicants are strongly encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will have a proven capacity for writing and communication, excellent interpersonal skills, and strong quantitative skills (e.g. statistics, bioinformatics). A BS or MS degree in ecology, microbiology, or a related field is also preferred. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, CV, GPA and GRE scores, and the names and contact info for three references to Dr. Emily Farrer (efarrer@tulane.edu) as well as apply to the degree program. Applications are due January 15, 2017. Posted: 9/21/16.

Universitat de Valencia: Applications are invited for a PhD position to join the department of Plant Ecology in the Research Center of Desertification (CIDE). The successful candidate will work on a project investigating the use of biotic interactions as a tool to improve the success of ecological restauration proposals. The project focuses on the understanding of the environmental filters shaping plant communities in semiarid environments, especially in gypsum soils, and its effects on the phylogenetic diversity and local adaptations of plants in these communities. It will approach how certain biotic interactions such as plant facilitative interactions, plant-mycorrhizal fungi and plant-herbivore interactions can alleviate or promote environmental filters in these stressful environments. This PhD project will contribute to the understanding of biotic and abiotic filters shaping plant communities under stressful conditions in order to design efficient and successful ecological restauration proposals. The applicant will be encouraged to propose her/his own ideas and research interests within this conceptual framework, and in this sense, the candidate is expected to be highly motivated, and has curiosity and leadership skills in order to propose ideas independently. The Project will involve fieldwork in gypsum plant communities in south Alicante combined with greenhouse experiments in Moncada (Valencia, Spain). Applicants must have a finished her/his degree after the 1st of January of 2013 and have an average grade of academic record above 7.5 (out of 10). Interested applicants can apply via email to Alicia Montesinos Navarro (ali.montesinos@gmail.com), before the 15th of January of 2017 providing the following information: CV, academic record scores, brief statement of research interests, research experience and motivation, and the email of two researches willing to provide a support letter for the candidate. Posted: 1/3/17.

Universität für Bodenkultur: A 3-year PhD position funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) will become available at the Institute of Botany, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (Universität für Bodenkultur), Vienna, Austria. Tentative start date of the project is October 2017. Leaves have an intricate structure that is well-known to affect their ability to perform photosynthesis. It remains difficult to describe quantitatively how anatomical features, such as cell shape, chloroplast positions, etc. affect the photosynthetic process . Although three-dimensional reaction diffusion models of the leaf anatomy have been developed, they have not often been parametrized by accurate measurements of anatomy and physiology. Recent work has shown that leaf anatomy can change rapidly under drought stress, and this provides an interesting opportunity to examine the effect of anatomy on leaf photosynthesis in detail. To this end, high-resolution three-dimensional images are obtained for poplar leaves exposed to water deficits. At the same time, the photosynthetic performance of the leaves will be characterized by gas-exchange measurements. The anatomy observed during these experiments will be analysed using state-of-the-art reaction diffusion models of the leaf. Apart from visits to collaborators (France, Canada and/or Japan), work will be based in Vienna. The ideal candidate has experience electron and/or light microscopy, sample preparation (including microtome), gas-exchange, leaf hydraulic measurements and good English writing skills. Courses in various ecophysiological techniques relevant to the project will also be offered during the studies. Interested candidates can contact Danny Tholen (thalecress+p At gmail.com). Formal applications including a curriculum vitae, a letter explaining why you are interested in this research and two letters of support should be received before July 15. Posted: 5/31/17.

Université du Québec en Outaouais: Offre de bourse M.Sc. en biologie : Impacts de l’application de cendres en érablières sur la qualité biochimique du sol et la croissance de l’érable à sucre. A 2-year master of science scholarship (15k CDN$/yr)in forest ecology is announced at the Institute of Temperate Forest Sciences in Ripon (45.784058, -75.099255)in the beautiful region of Outaouais. A functional knowledge of French is mandatory prior to admission (TFI of 750/990). Full description of the project and contact information (French). Apply before March 25, 2017. Posted: 1/23/17.

University College Dublin: 4 year PhD position in the analysis of biological records (funded). Ecology now has a huge resource of biological recording data, collected by a wide range of people: citizen scientists, specialist recording volunteers, scientific field data (to name a few). These citizen science data contain valuable information on ecosystem biodiversity and how it is changing through time. However, the data also contain many confounding factors, such as variation from place to place in the intensity of recording (the recorder effort). How best should these data be used to guide conservation and policy? Are these data reliable for detecting changes in a species' numbers? How does citizen biological recording data compare to targeted monitoring schemes? This PhD project is based around the analysis of biological recording data, and will: 1. assess existing approaches to the analysis of biological recording data that aim to correct for confounding factors (e.g. FRESCALO, Good-Turing estimators or occupancy-detection models), 2. develop new spatial statistics for estimating species richness and species turnover 3. apply these approaches to biological records data in Ireland. The PhD candidate will be based at UCD for 4-years. The candidate should have a minimum of a 2.1 undergraduate science degree (or equivalent) with a strong quantitative background (a BSc. in a quantitative subject or a biological science degree with evidence of strong quantitative skills). The student will have the chance to work with the three postdocs on the project, the three PIs and project collaborators. The PhD is under the supervision Dr Jon Yearsley (UCD), with co-supervisors Dr Tomas Murray (National Biodiversity Data Centre) and Dr Dinara Sadykova (Queen's University Belfast). The PhD position is in collaboration with the National Biodiversity Data Centre in Waterford, and will involve a work placement at the data centre. The position comes with a consumables budget, a stipend of 18k euro per year and 5,500 euro per year towards fees. For further details of this post please contact: Jon Yearsley (Jon.Yearsley@ucd.ie). To apply, send a current CV and a covering letter be sent to Jon Yearsley (Jon.Yearsley@ucd.ie) by Wednesday 21st December 2016. Posted: 11/29/16.

University of Akron: A PhD assistantship is available for Fall 2017, in Randy Mitchell’s laboratory. A portion of the student’s research must focus on empirical exploration of the effects of ecological context (pollinator sharing) on pollination biology and mating system of Mimulus ringens in Ohio and Wisconsin. Beyond that requirement, there is substantial freedom to develop and explore many aspects of the general topics of pollination, and mating systems. The student’s research will be part of a joint project coordinated with Jeff Karron at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Dorset Trapnell (University of Georgia), Emmanuelle Porcher (Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle) and Celine Devaux (Université de Montpellier). This collaborative research will use empirical and theoretical investigations to test the hypothesis that interactions with co-flowering species alter the evolutionary tradeoff between outcross siring and selfing. This position includes TA support, and, pending funding, two years of RA support and summer stipend. The Integrated Biosciences PhD program is a unique interdisciplinary PhD program where biology is at the interface of research that cuts across traditional departmental boundaries. IB PhD students take a synthetic approach in their research and education, and gain skills and training in how to work across fields of study. For this project, interdisciplinary connections to mathematics, geography, or statistics are promising possibilities. Learn more about the Integrated Biosciences program and the Department of Biology. The University of Akron is a state university located in the heart of Akron, Ohio, near the scenic Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP). The Biology Department emphasizes collaborative and integrative research, including the PhD program in Integrated Bioscience, and a MS program in Biology. Facilities include a 400+ acre field station, greenhouse, and live animal research center. We have excellent relations with the CVNP and local metroparks, which provide access to over 40,000 acres of potential field sites within 40 miles. Our graduate students have been successful in finding employment in their specialties, including work as professors, consultants, field technicians, government agents (e.g., EPA, Department of Natural Resources), park naturalists, and so forth. The Biology Department has a strong program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Areas of interest for graduate research include: life history evolution, mating systems, aquatic ecology, pollination biology, wetland ecology, physiological ecology, isotope ecology, behavioral evolution, spider biology, and evolutionary biomechanics. For more information, contact Randy Mitchell (rjm2@uakron.edu). Posted: 12/23/16.

University of Alabama: The Lozier Lab, Dept. of Biological Sciences, is interested in recruiting graduate students to start in the Spring 2017 or Fall 2017 semester. Students would work on projects related to ongoing NSF-funded studies of bumble bee population genomics across spatial and environmental gradients (e.g., latitude, temperature) to uncover signatures of adaptative and demographic processes within and among species. Research projects in the lab utilize high throughput sequencing technologies, including RAD-tag sequencing and RNA sequencing, and new students would likely be involved in developing projects involving whole-genome sequencing approaches at the population level. Students with an interest in population genomics, especially with uncovering signatures of selection in wild populations via genome-environment-association analysis, should contact Jeff Lozier (jlozier@ua.edu) by November 1, with a brief statement of interest, a CV, an informal academic history (e.g., GPAs, GREs, and relevant coursework list, etc.), and an example of your writing (e.g., first-authored publication, lab report, class paper, etc). I am especially interested in recruiting students who are interested in or have experience working with native pollinators and have a background working with high-throughput sequencing, however students with a more general background in population genetics and molecular ecology should also feel free to contact me. Posted: 9/26/16.

University of Alabama: The Howeth Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences invites applications for two Ph.D. students in community and ecosystem ecology beginning January, May, or August 2017. Highly motivated and qualified students with a B.S. or M.S. in Biology/Ecology are sought to: (1) conduct studies to understand the role of succession in metacommunity and food web structure using replicate successional pond mosaics. Projects will focus on fish and/or invertebrate (e.g., crayfish, odonates, plankton) community composition and ecosystem properties among beaver-formed ponds in different stages of succession. This work will utilize field-based approaches in the streams and beaver ponds of the Talladega National Forest in Alabama, including the NSF NEON Domain 8 core site. The project will also involve dendrochronology, GIS, stable isotope analyses, and experiments at the University of Alabama Tanglewood Biological Station. This is a NSF-funded project. (2) conduct studies on the influence of metacommunity/ spatial dynamics on community invasibility, species diversity, and ecosystem function across scales using zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, and fish as a model system. This research can leverage observational studies of regional reservoirs/ponds and microcosm/mesocosm experiments at the University of Alabama Tanglewood Biological Station. The student will be encouraged to develop independent projects, testing and extending contemporary ecological theory. Students will be funded on a combination of teaching and research assistantships, which include a competitive stipend, health insurance, and a tuition waiver. Interested students should send an e-mail to Dr. Jennifer Howeth (jghoweth@ua.edu) no later than November 1 with "Graduate Assistantship" in the title, and include a (1) cover letter, (2) CV, (3) statement of research interests and experience, (4) scientific writing sample (e.g., laboratory report, thesis, manuscript), (5) GRE scores (if available), (6) unofficial copies of transcripts, and (7) contact information for three references in biology/ecology. Posted: 9/26/16.

University of Alabama, University of Georgia, University of Connecticut, Virginia Tech, and Coastal Carolina University: Five graduate student positions (PhD and MS) for project examining temperature effects on organic carbon processing in forest stream networks Our large, collaborative research group is initially recruiting five graduate students (4 PhD, 1 MS) to start work in 2017 on a recently funded project, which seeks to understand and predict the consequences of climate warming for heterotrophic communities and processing of terrestrial organic carbon in headwater stream networks. The project will examine the effects of temperature in a multi-scale design that includes a paired-catchment whole-stream warming experiment, an array of warmed streamside channels, laboratory studies of aquatic microbes, and reach- and network-scale modeling. The fieldwork will take place at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina. The following positions are available: 1. A PhD position at the University of Alabama, advised by Dr. Jon Benstead (jbenstead@ua.edu), which will focus on responses of invertebrate food webs in a whole-stream warming experiment. 2. A PhD position at the University of Georgia, advised by Dr. Amy Rosemond (rosemond@uga.edu), which will focus on watershed-scale carbon flux, detrital processing and stream carbon budgets. 3. A PhD position at the University of Connecticut, advised by Dr. Ashley Helton (ashley.helton@uconn.edu), which will focus on modeling carbon dynamics at reach and network scales. 4. A PhD position at Virginia Tech, advised by Dr. Erin Hotchkiss (ehotchkiss@vt.edu), which will focus on ecosystem metabolism and gas fluxes. 5. A MS position at Coastal Carolina University, advised by Dr. Vlad Gulis (vgulis@coastal.edu), which will focus on responses of aquatic microorganisms, including fungi. The positions are open until filled; start date is July/August 2017. All include a competitive stipend, full tuition waiver and (in most cases) health benefits. To apply, email the faculty member with whom you are interested in working (see above), providing a 1-page description of your research interests. Please also send your CV, a recent transcript (unofficial is OK), a writing sample, and names and contact information of three references. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Alaska Anchorage: MS Assistantship in Physiological Ecology. A research assistantship is available to participate in an NSF funded study of the importance of winter snow for the growth and reproduction of white spruce trees growing near their northern limit in Alaska. During the summer months, the position will be based at a remote site near the Arctic treeline in Noatak National Preserve, northwest AK. The study sites are approximately 20 miles east of Noatak and 40 miles north of Kotzebue, AK. Access is via bush plane during the summer and snowmachine during the winter. The successful candidate will measure photosynthetic and growth responses of the study trees to experimental deepening of the winter snowpack in three contrasting habitats. There are no permanent facilities at the Noatak site. Applicants should be prepared to spend long periods of time in the field between breaks in a well-appointed camp with a small group of collaborators. Physical fitness is essential for this position, which will require carrying up to a 50 lb pack over rough terrain and across a swift flowing river. Outdoor recreational opportunities (hiking, packrafting, fly fishing) are outstanding. The successful candidate will be based in Anchorage during the off-season (mid-September- late May). Laboratory and desk/office space is available and affordable housing can be found within a bike ride of campus. Anchorage is a surprisingly diverse city with outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities, including more than 130 km of groomed Nordic ski trails within the city limits. To apply, please send a resume and cover letter to Dr. Paddy Sullivan (pfsullivan@alaska.edu). Closing date: 12/15/16. Posted: 11/1/16.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: Graduate student opportunity in population biology and reproductive behavior of an insect herbivore. The Doak and Wagner labs are accepting applications for a graduate position (MS) to study the population biology and mating behavior of the aspen leaf miner (Phyllocnistis populiella). Research focuses on the role of multiple mating on reproductive success and population growth in a widespread herbivore prone to population outbreaks of extended duration. Applicants should be strongly motivated to work on insect ecology in the Alaskan boreal forest, and have competitive GPA and GRE scores. The preferred start date is late spring 2017. If interested please send a letter of interest, CV, GRE scores and contact information for three references to Pat Doak, pdoak@alaska.edu. Posted: 1/3/17.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: The Institute of Arctic Biology has openings for two graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) to work with Syndonia Bret-Harte and Roger Ruess on a new NSF-funded project on shrub feedbacks to C and N cycling in arctic tundra. In the Arctic, a widespread shift from tundra to deciduous shrub-dominated vegetation appears to be underway, which could have profound implications for regional climate, C balance, and biogeochemical cycling. Because much of the world’s soil C is stored in arctic and boreal regions, changes in the Arctic’s C budget may feed back strongly to global climate. Because biogeochemical C and N cycles are linked tightly in arctic ecosystems and plant production is strongly N-limited, shrubs affect soil C through their effects on near-surface soil N, via both SOM turnover and N inputs. One student (M.S. or Ph.D.) will focus on shrub growth and impacts on N uptake and near surface N cycling, and will be advised by Bret-Harte. One student (M.S.) will focus on characterizing shrub impacts via nitrogen fixation associated with Siberian alder, and will be advised by Ruess. Students will have an opportunity to develop their own research questions within the overall framework of the project. We expect that Bret-Harte and Ruess will serve on both students’ graduate committees, and that we will work together in the field. Research sites will be accessed from the Toolik Field Station. Students will be supported through a combination of research assistantships and teaching assistantships. Students will start fieldwork in the summer of 2017, and coursework in the fall of 2017. For more information, please contact Syndonia Bret-Harte by email at msbretharte@alaska.edu. You must also apply for graduate study to the Department of Biology and Wildlife; the deadline for applications is January 15, 2017. Posted: 12/8/16.

University of Alaska Fairbanks: The Williams lab (Cory Williams) is moving to the University of Alaska Fairbanks and looking to recruit graduate students (PhD and/or MS) to the Biology & Wildlife Program for Fall 2017. Research in the Williams lab is broadly focused on seasonal timing, stress ecophysiology, and circadian rhythms in vertebrates. At least one of the graduate positions will focus on the physiological mechanisms that underlie activation of the reproductive axis in hibernating ground squirrels. If interested, please send an email to ctw55555@gmail.com with a CV and research interests. Posted: 11/8/16.

University of Alberta: The Soil Biogeochemistry group in the Department of Renewable Resources is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student to join our team. Project: Boreal forest soils are the single largest terrestrial carbon storehouse in the world. Consequently, changes in boreal carbon stocks and fluxes could significantly affect the global carbon cycle. These northern, high-latitude soils are also highly susceptible to global warming, and in the coming century are expected to face large increases in average temperatures, altered freeze-thaw patterns, and transformative vegetation shifts. The carbon contained in boreal soils is a complex network of interconnected pools, the stability of which may be controlled by various mechanisms. As such, it has been challenging to predict the response of boreal soil carbon to environmental changes. This Ph.D. project will aim to clarify how interactions between the soil geological material and vegetation may ultimately determine the response of boreal soil carbon to climatic changes. We will use a variety of methods, including NMR and stable isotope tracking, to evaluate the source and fate of boreal carbon in soil profiles under different environmental conditions. Qualifications: Candidates must have a M.Sc. (or equivalent) in soil science, chemistry or a related environmental science discipline. Strong verbal and written communication skills are essential. The project will include some field sampling. A Class 5 Driver license is required, and experience working in difficult and remote terrain will be an asset. This project will also involve substantial laboratory work where attention to detail is essential. Prior experience with analytical techniques used in environmental chemistry is preferred. Students must commence their graduate study between September 2017 and May 2018. The project is funded by NSERC. A yearly stipend of $25k will be provided. In addition, the University provides competitive recruitment awards between $5k and $10k for outstanding applicants. Graduates from a Canadian University with a GPA>3.5 on a 4.0 scale and international students with equivalent academic accomplishments usually receive an entrance award. Interested candidates should e-mail their transcript, a detailed curriculum vitae, a cover letter that summarizes their qualifications and research goals, and the names and contact information of three references to Dr. Sylvie Quideau at sylvie.quideau@ualberta.ca. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Alberta: A PhD position is available in the Plant-Water Relations Lab. The successful candidate will study how transport in xylem and phloem is impacted by abiotic stress. We are particularly interested in the impacts of water shortage. We will use poplar as a model plant. Clonal plants will be grown in a greenhouse or growth chamber. Limited field work or sample collection in the field is possible. Qualifications: 1) Background in Plant Biology/Ecophysiology/Molecular Biology or a related field. 2) Fluency in written and spoken English. 3) Interest in tree biology, functional anatomy/imaging, and ecophysiology. A MSc degree is a strong asset. Preferred start date: May 1, 2017. To apply: Please send a letter of interest explaining your motivation to apply for the position, CV, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for three references to Uwe Hacke (uwe.hacke@ualberta.ca). More information on the PhD program. Posted: 10/22/16.

University of Arizona: The Blankinship Laboratory of Biogeochemistry in the Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science is seeking an exceptional PhD student. The student will tackle grand challenges related to soil carbon (C) storage and soil health. The student will be expected to: 1) play a leadership role in a global data synthesis to unravel mechanisms of soil C stabilization and destabilization, and 2) develop strategies and a scientific basis for field projects aiming to accelerate soil C sequestration and enhance soil health. The ideal student will have a strong passion for and a bachelor’s and/or master’s degree in soil science, biogeochemistry, ecosystem ecology, or a related field. The student should have strong data analysis skills, laboratory and/or field experience collecting environmental data, and excitement for connecting science to societal challenges. The University of Arizona is located in beautiful Tucson near abundant field sites including the Catalina-Jemez Critical Zone Observatory, Santa Rita Experimental Range, Maricopa Agricultural Center, and Biosphere II. Recreational opportunities also abound. To apply, please send a: 1) letter of interest, 2) curriculum vitae, and 3) contact information for three references to jblankinship@email.arizona.edu. Please type “Soil Carbon PhD Opportunity” in the subject line. The deadline for applications is May 5 with a preferred start date on or before August 1. For more information, please contact Dr. Joseph Blankinship at the email address above. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Arkansas: I seek two Ph.D. students for a project examining flow-ecology relationships and environmental flows assessment for the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands and West Gulf Coastal Plains. Important products of this work will be regional flow-ecology relationships that will form the scientific framework for setting environmental flow standards and understanding impacts of land use and climate change. These flow-ecology relationships will help determine environmental flow needs in the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands and the West Gulf Coastal Plains and will provide the basis for conservation of numerous aquatic species. This project will involve using existing data sets to model flow-ecology relationships and may also involve field work in the Interior Highlands and lab experiments. Applicants should have a BS and MS in fisheries, ecology, biology, or a related field and; 3.0 GPA (minimum); 300 (V+Q) minimum GRE. Previous research experience with fish, invertebrates and/or streams is preferred. Strong quantitative skills including knowledge of GIS are required. Applicants must be responsible, motivated, and able to work independently and in teams. Graduate student stipend will be $18,700 plus full tuition waiver with potential for additional fellowships. Applications will be considered as they are received but for full consideration all materials should be sent by January 6, 2017. Start date is summer or fall 2017. Contact me for information or email 1) a letter describing your interests and career goals, 2) Curriculum Vitae (including GPA and GRE scores), 3) names and telephone numbers of three references, and 4) unofficial transcripts to: Dan Magoulick, danmag@uark.edu, 479-575-5449. Posted: 12/24/16.

University of Arkansas: We are offering a fully-funded research assistantship focused on surveys, modeling, and prioritization of dragonfly species endemic to the lovely Ozark-Ouachita mountain region of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The purpose of the project is to improve knowledge of the distribution, requirements, and priority status of Gomphus ozarkensis, Ophiogomphus westfalli, Cordulegaster talaria, and Somatochlora ozarkensis. We anticipate doing this through a combination of habitat-directed surveys, ecological niche modeling to predict and map potential distributions (both current and projected under climate change), and ranking each species based on range-wide vulnerability and endemicity. The position is housed in the Siepielski lab in the Department of Biological Sciences. Additional partners include the Missouri Department of Conservation, New York Natural Heritage Program, Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, and University of Tennessee. The strongest candidates will have the following skills, experience, and interests: Interest in conservation science; Interest in odonates and lotic habitats; Ability to conduct extended periods of field work in remote settings (lots of hiking); Strong organization skills and the ability to work independently and with a team; Quantitative skills or aptitude; Experience with R, GIS, and/or ecological niche modeling (or the aptitude to learn quickly). Anticipated Start date will be ~ January 2017, although this is flexible. To apply, please send the following: (1) a cover letter that highlights relevant skills, experience, and interests; (2) a CV; (3) contact information for 3 references to amsiepie@uark.edu, and (4) GRE scores. Applicants must also apply to the graduate program in the department of biological sciences and the graduate school. The deadline for all application materials for the Spring 2017 semester is Nov 1, 2016. More information can be found on the ‘JOIN US’ section of the lab webpage. Please contact Adam Siepielski (amsiepie@uark.edu) or Jason Bried (bried@uark.edu) with any questions. Posted: 9/23/16.

University of Arkansas: One fully funded Ph.D. position is available in the Environmental Dynamics Program starting Fall 2016/Spring 2017. The successful candidates will develop a Ph.D. project using GIS and landscape modeling to analyze and measure the availability of Monarch butterfly habitat on agricultural lands under current and proposed agriculture conservation policies in the central US. The selected student will closely work with Drs. Jack Cothren, Marty Matlock, and Kusum Naithani. The main duties of this position will include compiling, organizing, and analyzing data from literature and remote sensing imageries. The expected deliverables include at least three peer-reviewed publications and an acceptable dissertation, as well as the successful completion of the requirements of the degree. QUALIFICATIONS: We are seeking an outstanding candidate with BS and/or MS in Ecology, Biology, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences and other closely related field. A past record of referred publication, strong quantitative skills and experience in working with R, Python and ArcGIS are desirable. The student will be offered a full assistantship ($30k/year) plus a tuition waiver. The assistantship is for four years, which is renewable annually based on satisfactory performance. Additional support for conference travel and research supplies is also available. APPLICATION: Please email a single PDF file (lastname_Monarch.pdf) including (1) a letter of interest with applicant’s contact information; (2) names, titles, and contact information for 3 references; (3) GRE and TOFEL (if applicable) scores; (4) an unofficial transcripts for previous BS and MS degrees; and (5) a Curriculum Vitae to Kusum Naithani at kusum@uark.edu. Posted: 7/18/16.

University of Arkansas: One fully funded M.S. position is available in the Naithani Lab starting Spring/Fall 2017. The successful candidates will work on a project to upscale hydropedological properties from sites to landscapes using field data and Bayesian Modeling. The main duties of this position will include compiling, organizing, and analyzing previously collected data and gather more data about soil hydraulic properties from multiple sites across US. The expected deliverables include at least one peer-reviewed publication and an acceptable thesis, as well as the successful completion of the requirements of the degree. QUALIFICATIONS: BS in Ecology, Biology, Environmental Sciences, Geosciences and other closely related field. A past record of research experience and willingness to learn R, Python, and ArcGIS are desirable. The student will be offered a full assistantship plus a tuition waiver. The assistantship is for two years and additional support for conference travel and research supplies is also available. APPLICATION: Please email a single PDF file (lastname_Hydropedology.pdf) including (1) a letter of interest with applicant’s contact information; (2) names, titles, and contact information for 3 references; (3) GRE and TOFEL (if applicable) scores; (4) an unofficial transcripts for previous BS degree; and (5) a Curriculum Vitae to kusum@uark.edu. Posted: 7/18/16.

University of Arkansas at Monticello: The School of Forestry & Natural Resources is seeking applicants for a M.S. Assistantship in tree ecophysiology and cellulose quality available beginning August 16, 2017 contingent upon funding. The assistantship is half time and carries an annual stipend of $15k plus tuition. Project: Novel bioproducts are being developed that utilize renewable cellulose from trees. This project seeks to evaluate the impacts of genetics and environmental stress (e.g., nutrient deficiency, and excess or insufficient water) on the quality of wood for the production of cellulosic nanocrystals, as well as the impacts of environment stress on tree physiology. Full description and requirements at http://www.afrc.uamont.edu/jobs/2017%2001%20Babst.pdf . Apply at http://www.uamont.edu/sfnr for position #: 2017-001. For additional information, please contact: Dr. Benjamin Babst, UAM School of Forestry and Natural Resources/Arkansas Forest Resources Center, P.O. Box 3468, Monticello, AR 71656, (870) 460-1348 babst@uamont.edu. Posted: 4/20/17.

University of Arkansas at Monticello: M.S. Assistantship: Use of prescribed burning to restore and maintain forest health. The School of Forestry & Natural Resources is seeking applicants for a M.S. Assistantship available beginning January 2, 2017. The assistantship is half time and carries an annual stipend of $15k plus tuition. Project: Prescribed burning is an ecologically important and widely used management tool. In the southern U.S., eight million acres are burned annually under prescription, with 300,000 acres burned in Arkansas alone. This project will examine prescribed burning effects on shortleaf pine and upland hardwood systems. Areas of focus are broad and accommodating to the student’s interest and may include the evaluation of shortleaf sprouting ability after burning, burning effects on oak regeneration, fire effects in long unburned stands, and fuel consumption. Requirements: Applicants must have a 2.7 overall undergraduate GPA or 3.0 GPA in the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate courses and satisfactory GRE scores. A B.S. degree in a natural resources-related field is also required. Applicants must have a valid U.S. driver’s license or obtain the same within 60 days of starting employment. Overnight travel is required as well as the ability to work outdoors in all weather conditions. The School of Forestry & Natural Resources is located in Monticello, Arkansas in the southeastern portion of the state. The Arkansas Forest Resources Center is also headquartered here, and is administered by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. The Arkansas Forest Resources Center is the research and extension arm for forest-based programs within the State. Additionally, the USFS Arkansas Forestry Sciences Lab is located at the School. The School and Center maintain several state-of-the-art laboratories (hydrology, soil, quantitative analysis, silviculture, wildlife ecology & management) available for graduate research and education. Applicants must be admitted to the University of Arkansas at Monticello and apply to the School of Forestry & Natural Resources before they can be considered for an assistantship (see link for application information). Applicants must submit all GRE scores, official transcripts, a statement of interests, and three letters of recommendation. Please indicate Position #: 2016-010 on all application materials and inquires. For additional information, please contact: Dr. Mohammad Bataineh, (870) 460-1449, Bataineh@uamont.edu. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Auckland: A PhD position in freshwater evolutionary ecology is available in the School of Environment. The position is associated with a project, funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund, which examines contemporary evolution of consumers in response to thermal change. The project uses populations of mosquitofish that have independently invaded geothermal systems in New Zealand and California, USA as model systems. Field and laboratory work will be conducted in both countries and entail collaboration with colleagues at the University of Auckland, the University of California Santa Cruz (USA) and the University of Maine (USA). Work will include field and laboratory assays of behavioral, morphological and physiological traits. Comparative studies and mesocosm experiments will be used to examine divergence in the ecological role of fish in the context of evolutionary and metabolic theories. The successful candidate will have demonstrated experience in or potential for research dealing with evolutionary and ecological processes in freshwater systems. Candidates should have a willingness and demonstrated ability to conduct field and laboratory work. The position begins in July 2017 and includes funds covering a stipend and university fees. Domestic and international students are encouraged to apply and applicants must meet criteria for entry into the PhD programme. To apply, please send a cover letter, CV, and the names and contact information for three references to: Dr. Kevin Simon (k.simon@auckland.ac.nz). Posted: 3/6/17.

University of Auckland: Two positions are available in the Institute of Marine Science and the University of Auckland. For more information, please contact Prof. Simon Thrush at simon.thrush@auckland.ac.nz. Coastal ecosystem services and the functional performance of ecosystems A PhD research project is available working on ecosystem services in coastal marine habitats. Coastal marine ecosystems support many services: habitat formation, sediment stabilisation, improving water clarity, storing carbon and processing nutrients. The research will focus on ecosystem functions that underpin critical services and seek to develop models of how the performance of specific ecosystem functions scales to changes in ecological and environmental conditions. Based on a conceptual analysis of selected ecosystem function performance curves, it is anticipated that field studies will be designed to assess the efficacy of these models. Work for the project may involve being based either at the University’s city campus or at Leigh Marine Laboratory. Cumulative impacts and the resilience of coastal ecosystems A PhD research project is available working on the potential for thresholds in estuarine and coastal soft-sediment ecosystems. The research will involve a mix of data analysis investigating non-linear change in spatial and time-series data and changes in ecosystem interaction networks. The research will also involve field experiments that attempt to investigate the response of ecological interaction networks to cumulative stressors. A PhD scholarship is available as part of the Tipping Points project in the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge. This will provide an opportunity for interaction with staff and students from Waikato, Canterbury and Otago Universities, NIWA and the Cawthron Institute. To enrol for a PhD at University of Auckland See: www.science.auckland.ac.nz/phd ; www.auckland.ac.nz/applynow ; www.postgraduate.ac.nz ; www.international.auckland.ac.nz ; www.scholarships.auckland.ac.nz [update: only the second position is still open as of 13 Jan 2017]. Posted: 11/29/16, revised: 1/16/17.

University of Auckland: Two PhD positions in paleoecology are available in the School of Environment. The positions are associated with a project focusing on tipping points in coupled terrestrial and lake systems, funded by the New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. The research will use cutting-edge methods in palaeoecology and paleolimnology, supported by quantitative modelling, to define how past and present human action in watersheds can drive large changes in terrestrial and lake community composition and trophic state. Fieldwork will be conducted in a range of systems on the North and South Islands of New Zealand. The successful candidates will have demonstrated experience and potential in research dealing with terrestrial and/or lake ecology. One PhD will focus on lake community dynamics using palaeolimnological approaches (led by Kevin Simon at the University of Auckland and David Hamilton at the University of Waikato) and the other will develop model-based approaches to improve understanding of tipping points in new and existing palaeoecological records (led by George Perry at the University of Auckland and Janet Wilmshurst at University of Auckland/Landcare Research). Candidates should have a willingness to conduct field, laboratory, and modelling work. Specific experience in palaeoecological analysis (pollen, diatoms, etc.) is highly preferred. The positions include funds covering stipends ($27k per yr for three years) and university fees and there will be the opportunity to work collaboratively with other institutions in NZ. Domestic and international students are encouraged to apply and applicants must meet the University’s criteria for entry into the PhD programme. To apply, please send a cover letter, CV, and the names and contact information for three references to: Dr. George Perry (george.perry@auckland.ac.nz) or Dr. Kevin Simon (k.simon@auckland.ac.nz). Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Auckland: Blue carbon under changing environmental conditions. As part of a new “Oceans of Change” initiative a funded PhD project is available through the Institute of Marine Science, University of Auckland. The PhD student will be based in the School of Environment at the University of Auckland, supervised by Dr Luitgard Schwendenmann. The pools and fluxes of carbon and nutrients in estuarine and coastal sediments are highly variable reflecting the lateral and vertical exchange of elements and sediment-biota interactions at the land – ocean interface. However, the factors and processes driving blue carbon storage and transformation remain largely unknown. Further, the combined effects of changing environmental conditions (e.g., terrestrial nutrient input, warming, ocean acidification) on sedimentary ecosystem processes and the stability of organic carbon has received little attention in New Zealand. Applicants for this project should hold a first class MSc or honours degree in biogeochemistry, environmental chemistry or closely related fields. Experience with carbon and nutrient measurements and manipulative experiments is preferred. To apply, please send evidence of qualifications (academic transcript) and research experience, curriculum vitae and contact details of two academic referees, to l.schwendenmann@auckland.ac.nz before 30 September 2016. More info. Posted: 9/6/16.

University of Auckland: Drought-induced forest mortality is a global phenomenon that is increasing as the climate changes. In New Zealand, projected drought scenarios are unprecedented in the last two million years so our unique vegetation is highly vulnerable to forest dieback. Dr Cate Macinnis-Ng has two PhD scholarships (stipend $NZ27K, plus tuition fees and health insurance for international students) to explore native vegetation responses to drought. The research will involve a field-based drought experiment, glasshouse studies and modelling of plant responses to climatic conditions. Applications should be submitted through Kauri Drought Doctoral Scholarships. Please contact Cate (c.macinnis-ng@auckland.ac.nz) for more details. Closing date 19th August 2016 with a possible extension if suitable candidates are not found. Posted: 7/22/16.

University of Bayreuth: A new 3-year PhD position in Biogeographic Modelling at the Dept. of Biogeography (Prof. Beierkuhnlein) has just opened focusing on species distribution modelling! The candidate can get involved in various projects in the fields of nature conservation, protected areas or societal health, as well as other core topics of the research group (climate change, islands). The position can be filled as as soon as May 1, so please apply as soon as possible! For more information see the full description. Posted: 4/5/17.

University of Bayreuth: We would like to advertise the application deadline this summer for an attractive and intense international MSc study program in Global Change Ecology at the University of Bayreuth in Germany. Either you in person or bachelor students and graduates around may be interested in this qualification. The program is devoted to understanding and analyzing the most important and consequential environmental concern of the 21st century; namely, the ecological consequences of Global Change, especially the effects of climate change and biodiversity loss. One of the program's focus is the linking of natural science and socio-economic perspectives. The international program is realized in close contact with research institutions, NGOs and companies and administration. Our study program has been acknowledged by the United Nations as an observer organization. Teaching language is in English. Accepted candidates do not have to pay tuition fees. Applicants from any academic background that is related to the scope of this study program are welcome to apply. Applications can be uploaded on the Online Application portal. The deadline is 15th of June 2017. Posted: 4/3/17.

University of Bayreuth: The Department of Plant Ecology at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, offers a position for a Doctoral Researcher (65% TV-L E13) for 3 years, starting in April 2017. The research group examines various aspects of how abiotic and biotic factors influence plant performance, distribution patterns and community composition, and considers them in the context of global change. The doctoral researcher will participate in the research project 'The role of nutrients for the variability of drought effects on community composition and productivity across land use gradients in grasslands: a trait-based approach'. The project will take place in the framework of the Biodiversity Exploratories and will be based at the University of Bayreuth. Candidate’s qualifications: (1) M. Sc. Degree (or diploma) in Ecology, Biology or Botany, (2) strong background in plant physiological ecology, functional ecology and/or experimental field research, (3) strong statistical background, (4) good oral and written communication (English is required, German a plus), (5) organizational skills, (6) capability and desire to communicate and interact with other scientists. People with disabilities will be taken into consideration. The University aims to increase the proportion of women and therefore explicitly invites women to apply. Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests, and contact information for 3 referees (preferably via email) to Prof. Dr. Bettina Engelbrecht, Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, email: bettina.engelbrecht@uni-bayreuth.de. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. The review process will start in February. Posted: 1/16/17, revised: 2/22/17.

University of British Columbia: The Carrillo Lab (Faculty of Land and Food Systems) is recruiting PhD and MSc students for Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 start dates for research in plant-insect ecology and evolution. Students from underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply. Research in the lab is in fundamental plant ecology and evolution, but many projects have an applied component concerning plant interactions with herbivores. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own research questions, but can also work on ongoing projects in the lab. For example, we are currently researching: 1) trait loss in populations due to ecological or evolutionary divergence (e.g. native vs. invasive plant populations, domesticated crops vs. their wild relatives); 2) soil and plant-mediated performance of parasitoids and natural enemies on insect herbivores; and 3) the evolution and ecology of plant tolerance of herbivory. The lab is affiliated with the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at the UBC Farm, an interdisciplinary group of plant, soil, and social scientist with strong community ties to local growers and food producers. The Carrillo Lab is also a member of the Biodiversity Research Centre, which offers a rich academic program in ecology and evolutionary biology and brings together a diverse group of faculty, postdocs, and graduate students across campus. Applicants will ideally have a background in ecology, evolutionary biology, or entomology and must have previous research experience. To apply, please email juli.carrillo@ubc.ca no later than Dec 15th (for a Fall 2017 start), and preferably much sooner, a brief description of your research interests and future directions, your CV and unofficial academic transcript, as well as the contact information for three references. Full applications to the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and the Graduate School at UBC are due by January 1, 2017 for the September 2017 semester. Posted: 11/10/16.

University of British Columbia: The Williams Lab (Department of Geography and Biodiversity Research Centre) is looking for a Ph.D. student to join our growing group for Fall 2017. Ongoing research includes projects on (1) contemporary evolution and the speed at which populations move across landscapes, (2) plant life history strategies in changing climates, and (3) variation in plant-herbivore and plant-pollinator interactions across space and time. We take a variety of approaches including experiments in the field and greenhouse and quantitative modeling. The PhD student will have the opportunity to develop his or her own research goals related to the broader lab objectives. Competitive applicants will have completed an independent research project that has the potential to move toward publication; be motivated to develop or expand on their quantitative skills (statistical or modeling); and will bring curiosity and independence to their research. Students in the group benefit from interacting both with a diverse group of geographers interested in the environment, and with ecologists and evolutionary biologists from across UBC, who are brought together by the Biodiversity Research Centre for classes, seminars and discussion groups. We have ties with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, the B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, and land managers at native prairie sites across the Pacific Northwest that can facilitate locating field sites and developing applied angles of research projects. Applications are due in early January 2017, but I encourage interested students to contact me well before this date. Please send an email (jennifer.williams@geog.ubc.ca) including a brief statement that describes your research interests and why you are interested in graduate school, and attach your CV and an unofficial transcript. All students admitted to Geography are guaranteed a stable minimum income that comes from a combination of teaching assistantships and UBC fellowships. Outstanding students will be competitive for a UBC Four Year Fellowship, and I would be happy to assist Canadian students with their NSERC CGS-D applications. Posted: 10/12/16.

University of California Berkeley: The Geography Department and the Energy and Resources Group (ERG) have up to two Graduate Student Researcher (GSR) opportunities for PhD students to investigate global change impacts on tropical forests. These GSR positions will focus on disturbance and recovery dynamics in natural and human-impacted tropical forest ecosystems. The successful candidates will become part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) Tropics science community, a large, interdisciplinary team collaborating to improve Earth system model (ESM) projections of tropical forest responses and feedbacks to climate change. Students with experience carrying out ecological field research in the tropics, and that have utilized tools such as remote sensing, GIS or computational modeling of populations, communities or ecosystems will be strong candidates for these positions. The position is 50% time (20 hours/week) with two years of support, and with potential renewal for additional years. Jeff Chambers (Geography) and Lara Kueppers (ERG) will serve as advisors for the successful candidates. Interested graduate applicants should apply for admission to the University of California, Berkeley, Department of Geography or ERG through the online graduate application portal, and contact Professor Jeff Chambers (jqchambers@berkeley.edu) or Lara Kueppers (lmkueppers@lbl.gov) via email. The application deadline for Geography is December 1, for ERG December 2, 2016. Posted: 10/5/16.

University of California, Davis: Ph.D. student position in Agro-Ecology and/or Conservation Science; Department of Wildlife, Fish, & Conservation Biology. We are seeking Ph.D. students interested in agro-ecology and/or conservation biology to join the Karp Lab in the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology. The Karp lab has a diversity of ongoing projects focused on (1) understanding patterns of biodiversity across climate and land-use gradients, (2) quantifying impacts of alternative agricultural practices on biodiversity-driven ecosystem services and disservices, and (3) identifying tradeoffs among biodiversity and ecosystem services to inform development of multi-functional landscapes. Candidates with interest and/or experience in conservation science, ecosystem services, agro-ecology, community ecology, and/or countryside biogeography are encouraged to apply. If interested, please send a current CV with GPA and GRE scores and a brief (<1 page) statement describing your research interests to Daniel Karp (dkarp@ucdavis.edu). Interested applicants would apply to UC Davis’s Graduate Group in Ecology, which is consistently ranked as one of the top ecology graduate programs in the US. Applications are due Dec. 15, 2016. Posted: 10/11/16.

University of California Irvine: One full-time postdoctoral position and one graduate student position are available at the University of California Irvine in Dr. Steven Allison’s research group. Successful candidates should have interests in microbial processes, soil carbon cycling, and/or ecosystem ecology and experience in mathematical, computational, or data sciences. A record of publication in peer-reviewed journals is strongly recommended for postdoctoral candidates and encouraged for graduate student applicants. Positions are funded by the Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, and European Research Council. Potential projects include: · Trait-based modeling of microbial communities and functioning under drought conditions · Modeling of greenhouse gas fluxes in Australian tropical forests · Development and parameterization of microbial-ecosystem models · Model-data integration with soil priming effects. Interested candidates should email a CV and cover letter to allisons@uci.edu as soon as convenient. In addition, postdoctoral candidates should apply at https://recruit.ap.uci.edu/apply/JPF03545. Prospective graduate students should apply through relevant graduate programs in biological sciences, physical sciences, or gateway programs. Note that graduate application deadlines are often December 1. Postdoctoral candidates are encouraged to apply by August 1, 2017. Posted: 5/31/17.

University of California Irvine: Microbes in a Changing Environment. Up to 3 full-time postdoctoral and 3 full-time graduate student positions are available. Successful candidates will integrate –omics approaches with models and experiments to analyze microbial traits, communities, and carbon cycling under drought conditions. These positions are supported by a DOE Genomic Science grant to co-investigators Steven Allison, Michael Goulden, Adam Martiny, Jennifer Martiny, and Kathleen Treseder at UC Irvine as well as Eoin Brodie at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Postdocs and students will work under the supervision of one or more investigators to address specific project components, including: • Culturing, experimental manipulation, and multi-omics analysis of bacteria and fungi • Manipulation and community analysis of bacteria and fungi in grassland and shrubland ecosystems • Synthesis and analysis of microbial trait data from genetic databases • Trait-based modeling of microbial communities and functioning under drought conditions. Interested candidates should email a CV and cover letter indicating an area of research interest to at least one of the co-investigators who could serve as a potential supervisor. Competitive postdoctoral candidates will be encouraged to submit a formal application through https://recruit.ap.uci.edu; competitive prospective graduate students will be invited to apply to relevant graduate programs in biological sciences, physical sciences, or gateway programs. Note that graduate application deadlines are often December 1. Postdoctoral candidates are encouraged to apply by November 1, 2016. Posted: 10/11/16.

University of California Riverside: Graduate assistantships are available in the area of ecological genomics and biotic stress response in plants in the Nabity lab beginning fall 2017. There is flexibility in the project but the successful applicant/s will initially focus research on plant manipulation by insects. Current lab projects focus on identifying insect effectors that transform plant host morphology, identifying plant signaling networks that result in novel induced phenotypes, and comparative analyses of both plants and insects, with more information available at www.nabitylab.org Travel, field and greenhouse experiments, and molecular lab work will all be part of the successful projects. Students will also have opportunities to conduct fieldwork in the University of California Natural Reserves. Students will be able to join through one of multiple departments, including Botany and Plant Sciences or Entomology and participate in interdisciplinary programs as appropriate. To apply, please contact Dr. Nabity (paul.nabity@wsu.edu) by December 4 with your CV, unofficial transcript(s), GRE scores, and a short statement describing prior research experience and interests. Full applications to the Botany and Plant Sciences program are due by December 19. Posted: 11/29/16.

University of California Riverside: I (Darrel Jenerette, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences) am recruiting a Ph.D. graduate student for a recently funded project directed towards nitrogen cycling in high temperature agricultural systems. The project goals are to improve understanding and to evaluate mitigation potential of agricultural contributions to air quality and greenhouse gasses. The project features opportunities to work with a unique combination of nitrogen trace gas emission measurements using fast response environmental sensors, remote sensing from multiple imaging platforms, coupled soil-atmosphere process modeling, and engagement with policy through California’s cap and trade system. The student will work with an interdisciplinary team at the University of California with collaborators at the California State University East Bay and University of Iowa. Recent findings (Oikawa et al. 2015, Nature Communications; Liang et al. 2016 Global Change Biology) describe the theoretical and empirical justifications for the project. As part of the Jenerette lab, the student will join a diverse group of researchers who value both basic science and applications directed to improving societal sustainability. We foster a collaborative environment for success in the program and as a platform for a wide range of future careers. Training is individualized to student needs and emphasizes critical and creative scientific thinking, technical skill development, working in diverse teams, and science communication from publishing high quality journal articles to oral presentations and engagement with the public. Interested students should contact Darrel Jenerette (darrel.jenerette@ucr.edu) and provide a short description of background, interests, and goals. Information about the application process (due December 19, 2016) and our graduate program are available on the departmental webpage. Posted: 11/15/16.

University of California Riverside: Graduate opportunities are available in the lab of Dr. Kurt Anderson for prospective Ph.D. students wishing to pursue topics in quantitative population and community ecology. In particular, students are being sought to participate in an NSF-funded project that is using mathematical theory and laboratory microcosms to test how spatial patterns in dispersal connectivity and productivity influence food web dynamics. Research in the Anderson Lab spans a wide variety of topics at the intersection of theoretical, empirical, and applied ecology, and lab members have explored these topics in a variety of aquatic and terrestrial systems. Our activities however are united by a strong quantitative focus. While previous modeling experience is not necessary, a desire to learn and apply mathematical theory is a plus. Furthermore, because of the nature of the grant, applications from prospective students with an interest in mentoring undergraduate research projects are especially encouraged. Successful applicants will be enrolled in the graduate program in Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology (eeob.ucr.edu) that has over 40 cooperating faculty from numerous campus departments. Funding for a stipend and health benefits will be provided to the successful applicant through graduate research and teaching assistantships. Fellowship opportunities from campus and graduate program sources are also available for qualified individuals. Through formal and informal training, students in will have the opportunity to gain marketable skills in mathematics and advanced statistics, computer programming (in R, Mathematica, or Matlab), laboratory techniques, spatial analysis, and outreach/mentorship. Assistance with grant proposal writing, pedagogy, and quantitative skills is also available through UCR’s Graduate Division. Additional information: graduate studies at UCR. Deadline for priority consideration is December 1st. Prospective students should contact Dr. Anderson before this date and provide a CV and statement of interest: Kurt E. Anderson, Ph.D. (kurt.anderson@ucr.edu), Associate Professor, Department of Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. Posted: 11/9/16.

University of California Riverside: Two Ph.D. positions are available in the lab of Dr. Nicole Rafferty in the Department of Biology for fall 2017. Research in the lab spans the fields of community ecology, population biology, and global change, with a focus on plants and pollinators. Current research centers on understanding how climate change-induced shifts in phenology and spatial distribution affect species interactions. Students will participate in the Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (EEOB) Graduate Program with opportunities to conduct fieldwork in the University of California Natural Reserves and the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab. Students can benefit from the strong and growing network of community and pollination ecologists across departments (including the Department of Entomology and the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences). Preference will be given to applicants with prior ecological research experience and a B.S. or M.S. in biology or a related discipline. Applicants from under-represented groups are encouraged. To apply, please contact Dr. Rafferty (nicole.rafferty@wsu.edu) by November 17 with your CV, unofficial transcript(s), GRE scores, and a short statement describing prior research experiences and interests. Full applications are due to the EEOB Program by December 1. Posted: 9/13/16.

University of California Riverside: Plant community ecology (2 PhD positions). Seeking two Ph.D. students to join the Spasojevic Ecology lab at UC-Riverside in the Fall of 2017. Applicants should have a background in ecology with an interest in community assembly, biogeography, or global change. I am looking for students interested in one of the two following research areas: 1) Alpine Community Ecology or 2) Southern California Forest Dynamics. The department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology at UCR offers a competitive package for graduate students. Applications are due December 1st 2016. If you are interested in either of these opportunities please send me an email (markos@ucr.edu) detailing your research ideas and background, well in advance of the December deadline for applications. Prospective students from traditionally under-represented groups are encouraged to apply. Posted: 7/25/16.

University of Canterbury: PhD Scholarship – Plant Ecophysiology and Molecular Biology. Application of molecular techniques to determine the functional diversity of organisms regulating carbon/nitrogen dynamics, leaching and gaseous nitrogen losses in grazed grassland. We seek a PhD candidate to join a 3-year research program based at Landcare Research and the University of Canterbury (UC) to investigate the coupling of soil C and N cycling in grazed agricultural systems. The research is supported by funding from the New Zealand Government. The research team headed by Professors Matthew Turnbull (UC) and David Whitehead and Dr Gwen Grelet (Landcare Research). We seek a PhD candidate with a demonstrated a high level of academic achievement at the undergraduate and postgraduate level. They will be required to have a B.Sc. (Hons) or equivalent to enrol as a PhD candidate at UC. The candidate will require a background in plant physiology and/or soil science. Some background in biochemistry/molecular biology and/or genomics/bioinformatics would be an advantage. The PhD candidate will be required to undertake both fieldwork and lab-based investigations in the course of their research. The stipend will be for three years at NZD21k p.a. (tax free) plus payment of tuition fees and associated services charges and insurance (approx. $9k p.a.). The candidate will also have the opportunity to present their work at an international conference in the latter half of their project. The aim of the research is to develop more effective ways for farmers to reduce nitrogen leaching to groundwater and nitrous oxide emissions by investigating links between soil carbon inputs and nitrogen losses. Reducing nitrogen losses is a key challenge for landowners and there is urgent need to provide solutions for shallow, stony soils in eastern areas where irrigation is enabling widespread conversion to intensive pastoral farming. The PhD project will contribute to a collaborative approach to manipulate soil carbon inputs from root exudates, change the composition of animal urine and use irrigation to reduce losses by stimulating nitrogen immobilisation and inhibiting nitrous oxide emissions. The topic for the PhD will be selected to contribute a specific research project towards solutions for three key issues: (i) application of molecular techniques to determine the functional diversity of organisms regulating carbon and nitrogen dynamics, (ii) coupling functional diversity to the poorly understood biological drivers of both leaching and gaseous nitrogen losses, and (iii) manipulating carbon inputs experimentally to demonstrate the impacts on soil biological activity leading to reduced nitrogen losses. This new knowledge will inform nutrient budgeting models and lead to new management practices to reduce farm nitrogen losses. The proposed start date for the research is in the late 2016, depending on the availability of appropriate candidates. For more information please contact: Prof. Matthew Turnbull, School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. Tel +64 3 364 2987 (Ext 7040), Fax +64 3 364 2590, matthew.turnbull@canterbury.ac.nz. Applications must be made directly to the above contact on the UC Connect Doctoral Scholarship application form by October 3, 2016. We expect to skype-interview a short-list of potential candidates in October. Posted: 5/13/16, revised: 9/6/16.

University of Central Arkansas: Energetics of insect-plant interactions – M.S. position, Department of Biology. We are seeking applications for a graduate student position to develop projects on the energetic costs of herbivore behaviors that function to circumvent plant defenses. A new Sable gas exchange instrument will be used to measure the energetic costs of girdling or trenching by caterpillars. Whereas plant defenses have been analyzed in considerable detail in many systems, the costs and benefits of herbivore offense are poorly known. The graduate student will be co-advised by Drs. David Dussourd and Matt Gifford. Receipt of the position is contingent upon acceptance into the Biology graduate program with successful progress toward the MS degree required for continuation. The position will begin in the Fall semester 2017. Support would come from a Teaching Assistantship during the academic year, which includes a full tuition waiver. Qualifications: Earned 4-year degree from an accredited college or university (biology, ecology, evolution, or related field preferred). Ability to work independently with good communication skills both in writing and speaking desired. Experience working with insects and/or plants preferred, but not required. Qualified applicants should email Dr. David Dussourd (dussourd@uca.edu) and include a statement of interests, a CV that details academic background and standardized testing scores, and contact information for two references. Application deadline is March 1, so please submit applications prior to this date for full consideration. Posted: 2/6/17.

University of Central Florida: The Parkinson lab is interested in recruiting multiple Ph.D. students to begin fall 2017. Our goal is to find students interested in carrying out dissertation research that focuses on snake evolution, biogeography, systematics, and/or venom diversification & evolution. The students would be part of an active group conducting research in the above areas and also other systematics/conservation of vertebrate studies. The students would also have the opportunity to be involved in a recently awarded NSF Dimensions of Biodiversity grant on snake venom evolution that involves collaborations with Florida State University and the Ohio State University as well as international collaboration with researchers in Brazil, Costa Rica, and Mexico. The ideal applicant would have prior research experience; including field experience, strong quantitative skills, the ability or potential ability to communicate in either Spanish or Portuguese and an interest in learning bioinformatic and phylogenomic techniques. A Master's degree is preferred but not required. The student would join a vibrant lab which utilizes phylogenetics, phylogenomics, transcriptomics and other molecular evolutionary techniques to investigate a wide range of evolutionary biology and conservation related questions with snakes & lizards. Interested students should contact Dr. Christopher L. Parkinson (Parkinson@ucf.edu), Dept. of Biology, 4110 Libra Dr., University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 with a statement of interest, a CV, their transcripts and their GRE scores. I will start review of applicants Nov. 1, 2016. Please see the links above for additional information. Posted: 9/28/16.

University of Central Florida: The Mason Lab in the Department of Biology is currently recruiting motivated, curious, and enthusiastic PhD students to join the lab in Fall 2017. As a plant evolutionary ecophysiology lab, our research naturally centers on the intersection of plant ecology, evolution, physiology, and genetics. We are especially interested in the physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying plant adaptation to diverse environmental pressures, including abiotic factors like climate and soil fertility, and biotic factors like herbivory and disease. All plants face physiological trade-offs between growth, defense, and reproduction, and we seek to understand the coordinated evolution of the traits that govern these three core functions. Our research addresses a variety of questions across multiple scales, from macroevolution to population differentiation to within-individual variation, as well as in multiple systems, from crops to wild herbs and woody plants. Project topics for prospective students are highly flexible, and interested students should contact Chase Mason (chasemason.evolution@gmail.com) to discuss research interests before applying to the Department of Biology Graduate program, which has a deadline of January 15th. The Department of Biology provides teaching and research assistantships, tuition waivers, and health insurance, and a variety of competitive university fellowships are also available. The University of Central Florida is the largest university in the United States, with an enrollment of 63,000 students. Over the past two decades, UCF has undergone a dramatic expansion and development into a modern R1 university. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Central Florida: The Aquatic Biogeochemistry Lab is recruiting one MS student and one PhD student interested in coastal and wetland ecology and biogeochemistry to join our lab. Both students will be supported on graduate research assistantships (GRAs), which provide full tuition and stipend. The students will work on an NSF-funded interdisciplinary project focused on understanding the ecological impacts of oyster reef and living shoreline restorations on biogeochemical processes and microbial ecology in the Indian River Lagoon, FL. Students will have the freedom to develop a thesis/dissertation project related to this subject, or another topic of their choosing that falls within the research focal areas of the ABL. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of a 3.0 and GRE scores in the 50th percentile or higher for verbal and quantitative to qualify for admission into the UCF Biology Department. Interested students should email Dr. Lisa Chambers (lisa.chambers@ucf.edu). Posted: 7/7/16, revised: 9/20/16, 10/28/16.

University of Colorado Colorado Springs: Master’s student position for a project examining climate impacts on plant-insect interactions at UCCS. The project’s primary goal is to determine direct and indirect effects of host plant phenology on multi-trophic interactions. Applicants with interest in both field research as well as laboratory techniques are encouraged to apply. The student will be based at UCCS during the academic year, with summer fieldwork conducted primarily at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, CO. MS program will begin in Fall 2017 at UCCS, but data collection may begin in Summer 2017 at RMBL. To express interest, please email (emooney@uccs.edu): (1) a statement of research interests/background and (2) the following supporting documents as a SINGLE PDF (a) CV, (b) a list of 3-4 professional references (names and contact information), (c) general GRE scores, and (d) unofficial transcripts. Teaching or research assistantships are available for applicants (US citizens) during the academic year, and funding for all costs of field research is available for summer 2017 and beyond. For full consideration (and after discussing interests with Dr. Mooney), interested students should apply to the UCCS graduate program in biology before February 1, 2017. Posted: 1/7/17.

University of Connecticut: A PhD-level graduate student position in Applied Forest Ecology is available in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. The position has full Research Assistant funding and will be available to begin studies in the Fall 2017 semester. The Fahey Lab conducts primary and applied research focused on improving our understanding of forest ecosystems and developing strategies to promote resilience in forested landscapes - for more information visit the lab website: http://faheylab.weebly.com. The funded project is focused on assessing the effects of traditional and ecologically-focused silvicultural treatments on canopy structural complexity and designing and testing management strategies to promote canopy structural complexity and light use efficiency in forests. To be considered please contact Dr. Robert Fahey prior to applying, via email (Robert.fahey@uconn.edu), with the following information: Curriculum vitae or resume, GPA and GRE scores, and a brief statement of research experience, interests, and career goals. Details about applying to the Graduate School. The Department accepts applications on a rolling basis, but contact with Dr. Fahey should be made before February 1st, 2017 to warrant full consideration. Posted: 1/11/17.

University of Connecticut: The Helton Lab seeks a PhD student, advised by Dr. Ashley Helton. The student's project will focus on understanding headwater stream carbon dynamics and their response to rising temperatures at the stream reach and river network scales. The student will work closely with PIs and students at collaborating universities and will have opportunities to travel to field sites in North Carolina. Prior experience in GIS, simulation modeling (or a strong quantitative background), and stream or landscape ecology preferred. The position includes a competitive stipend, tuition, and health insurance. To apply, e-mail Dr. Helton (ashley.helton@uconn.edu) a 1 page description of your research interests. Please also send your CV (including GPA and GRE scores), a recent transcript (unofficial is OK), and names and contact information of three references. Posted: 1/8/17.

University of Connecticut: Applications are invited for a PhD student to join the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment to work with Dr. Beth Lawrence. The Lawrence Lab conducts primary and applied research focused on improving our understanding of wetland plant community composition and ecosystem function. The successful applicant will work on a funded project investigating how sea level rise-driven shifts in coastal marsh vegetation impacts carbon and nitrogen cycling in southern New England; the project will involve extensive surveys of Long Island Sound marshes, a manipulative field experiment, laboratory assays, and modeling activities. Funding is available to begin field work during summer 2017, with the candidate enrolling in classes beginning in fall 2017 semester (August 2017). The ideal candidate for this project will have a MS in a related discipline, relevant field and laboratory research experience, as well as strong leadership and organizational skills to lead sample collection and processing activities. To be considered, please contact Dr. Beth Lawrence prior to applying via email (beth.lawrence@uconn.edu) with the following information: CV or resume, GPA and GRE scores, brief statement of research experience, interests and career goals, and contact information for 2-3 references. Details about applying to the Graduate School. The Department accepts applications on a rolling basis, but contact with Dr. Lawrence should be made before February 3, 2017 to warrant full consideration. Posted: 12/23/16.

University of Connecticut: The Simon lab seeks creative and motivated PhD students and Postdoctoral candidates interested in phylogenetics, molecular phylogenomics, bioinformatics, and/or symbiont-host interactions (endosymbionts and/or microbiomes) to begin in the summer or fall of 2017. Experience in the preceding subjects preferred but not required. Applicants will participate in an NSF sponsored project entitled: Exploring Symbiont Biodiversity and Complexity in the Family Cicadidae. The major goal of this proposal is to study the co-diversification and interaction between cicadas, their primary “obligate” endosymbionts, their secondary “facultative” endosymbionts and their gut microbiota. Cicada obligate endosymbionts have recently been demonstrated to exhibit spectacular and unprecedented genome diversity. Since cicada symbionts are largely unknown our work will result in considerable biodiversity discovery. We hypothesize that gain or loss of host-symbiont consortium members during cicada phylogenetic history will be correlated with internal or external environmental changes. We are most interested in the timing of symbiont consortium changes. For example, does the gain of a secondary (facultative) endosymbiont facilitate the breakdown or loss of primary (obligate) endosymbionts? Or does the breakdown or loss of the obligate endosymbiont allow invasion by a secondary endosymbiont? Similarly, we ask whether the changes in the gut microbiota affect primary endosymbionts (keeping in mind that gut microbiota are known to synthesize essential amino acids for some hosts). Other hypotheses concern changes in symbiont consortium membership related to changes in the biotic or abiotic external environment coincident with the invasion of new biogeographic areas characterized by different climates and host plants. Broader impacts will involve teaching collaborations with team members in the US, Brazil, China, India, NZ, and Fiji. Field trips to Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Fiji, and India are planned. Senior Personnel and collaborators on the project include: Thomas Buckley (NZ), David Marshall, John Cooley, John McCutcheon, Emily and Alan Lemmon, Chris Owen, Beth Wade, Al Sanborn, Dan Mozgai, Max Moulds (AU), Ben Price (UK), Martin Villet (ZA), Deepa Agashe (IN), Krushnamegh Kunte (IN), Sudhanya Hajong (IN), Cong Wei (CN), Hong He (CN), Daniela Takiya (BR), Tatiana Ruschel (BR), and Peter Lockhart (NZ, FJ), and numerous cicada researchers around the world. Interested and qualified PhD candidates should send an email describing their motivation, skills, and research experience/interests along with a CV, GPA, GRE and TOEFL (if relevant) scores. Applicants should also arrange to have letters sent letters sent by three referees who are familiar with the candidates work. Strong applicants will be contacted to schedule an informal Skype interview. Applications to UCONN (early admission) are due December 15th with rolling admission thereafter. I recommend applying asap and prior to January 15th. Financial support for Ph.D. students is available via research assistantships from our NSF award, teaching assistantships, and university fellowships, but applications to outside funding sources are also strongly encouraged. Send all material to chris.simon@uconn.edu. The successful candidates will join the EEB Department and also have opportunities to work in the laboratories of collaborators. The EEB department is a diverse, highly collegial and interactive group of scientists. Relevant to these positions, we are particularly strong in Systematics with eight faculty members whose major focus is phylogenetic systematics and half a dozen others who use phylogenetics in their work. We offer three graduate courses in systematics (Principles and Methods of Systematics, Molecular Systematics, and Phylogenetic Systematics) plus numerous relevant grad seminars. There is a strong symbiont group on campus that includes members of EEB and Molecular and Cell Biology. EEB also has strengths in phenotypic plasticity and functional morphology, global change ecology, behavior, and organismal evolution, ecology and conservation. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Connecticut: A PhD-level graduate student position in Applied Forest Ecology is available in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. The position has full Research Assistant funding and will be available to begin studies in the Spring 2017 semester. The Fahey Lab conducts primary and applied research focused on improving our understanding of forest ecosystems and developing strategies to promote resilience in forested landscapes. The funded project is focused on assessing the effects of traditional and ecologically-focused silvicultural treatments on canopy structural complexity and designing and testing management strategies to promote canopy structural complexity and light use efficiency in forests. To be considered please contact Dr. Robert Fahey prior to applying, via email (Robert[dot]fahey[at]uconn[dot]edu), with the following information: Curriculum vitae or resume, GPA and GRE scores, brief statement of research experience, interests and career goals, and contact information for 2-3 references. See details about applying to the Graduate School. The Department accepts applications on a rolling basis, but contact with Dr. Fahey should be made before November 1st, 2016 to warrant full consideration. Posted: 9/23/16.

University of Connecticut: I seek a prospective student interested in pursuing a Masters of Science degree in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment beginning January 2017. The project and graduate assistantship is related to human dimensions of wildlife, with particular focus on black bears and black bear management strategies. Applicants should have: 1) a background in wildlife management, human dimensions of natural resources, and/or landscape ecology, or a related field, 2) interest in applied research focused on human dimensions of natural resources, landscape ecology, and spatial analysis, and 3) the ability to work both independently and as part of a research team. The student will be expected to present research results at professional conferences, publish research results in peer-reviewed scientific outlets, and pursue extramural funding to supplement their assistantship, as appropriate. Some experience with social science research and a working knowledge of GIS are preferred, but not required. Interested students are encouraged to send 1) a brief cover letter describing their professional background, relevant research experience and interests, career goals, and reasons for seeking a Masters degree, 2) names and contact information for three references, 3) a current curriculum vitae, and 4) copies of transcripts and GRE scores directly to me (Anita Morzillo; anita.morzillo@uconn.edu) as a single *.pdf document. Unofficial copies of transcripts and GRE scores are fine for initial contact. GRE scores must be less than five years old. Potential students must have received a GPA equivalent to a 3.0/4.0 on their last 90 term (or 60 semester) hours of their Bachelors program. Do not submit materials to the UConn Graduate School at this time. Applications will be reviewed as soon as they are received, but materials must be received before 20 October 2016. Posted: 9/20/16.

University of Connecticut: MS Opportunity in Wetland Ecology. A MS level graduate student position is available in the Lawrence Lab in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. The Lawrence Lab conducts primary and applied research focused on improving our understanding of wetland community composition and ecosystem function. The funded project is focused on assessing the impacts of road salt pollution on plant communities and carbon cycling in forested wetlands of southern New England. Research assistant funding is available for a master’s student to begin studies during the spring 2017 semester (January 2017). The ideal candidate for this project will have a BS in a related field, plant identification skills, previous field and laboratory research experience, the ability to work independently, and enthusiasm for the scientific process. To be considered, please contact Dr. Beth Lawrence prior to applying via email (beth.lawrence@uconn.edu) with the following information: Curriculum vitae or resume, GPA and GRE scores, brief statement of research experience, interests and career goals, and contact information for 2-3 references. See details about applying to the Graduate School. The Department accepts applications on a rolling basis, but contact with Dr. Lawrence should be made before November 1, 2016 to warrant full consideration. Posted: 9/20/16.

University of Connecticut: The laboratory of Interactions and Global Change is accepting applications from prospective M.Sc. and Ph.D students interested in the study of ecological and evolutionary processes in plant-arthropod interactions and climate change. E-mail the PI – Carlos Garcia-Robledo (carlos.garcia-robledo@uconn.edu), sending a one-page letter of intent describing your research interests, qualifications and a brief description of the type of research that you would like to pursue in grad school. Please also include your CV, unofficial transcripts, and if already available, GRE (all students) – TOEFL (only international students) scores. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Florida: We are seeking a highly-motivated student to conduct research on invasion risk of non-native plants. The student will pursue a MS degree through either the Agronomy Department or the School of Natural Resources and Environment (SNRE) Interdisciplinary Ecology program at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL starting Fall 2017 or Spring 2018. The student will be co-advised by Dr. S. Luke Flory and Dr. Deah Lieurance and will primarily work with Dr. Lieurance and the UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida’s Natural Areas, an internationally recognized invasion risk assessment program. Examples of previous research conducted through the UF/IFAS Assessment include evaluation of the invasion risk of clumping and running bamboo species (Lieurance et al., in review), predicted versus actual invasiveness of vine species in Florida (Gordon, Lieurance, & Flory, 2017), and the development of a list of low-risk biofuel species (Quinn, et al. 2015). We anticipate one part of the MS thesis to focus on use of the invasion risk assessment program and a second part to include observational or experimental field ecology. Applicants should have a background in ecology, environmental science, conservation biology, risk analysis, or a related field, and an interest in the ecology and management of invasive species. Additionally, applicants with experience in database management, statistical modelling, and other computer skills are encouraged to apply. Responsibilities of the MS student will include completing graduate coursework, research related to the UF/IFAS Assessment objectives, publishing research findings, and participating in outreach activities, such as educational workshops, and involvement with invasive species related organizations (e.g. Florida Invasive Species Partnership). The stipend for this assistantship is $21k/year and includes a full tuition waiver and access to health care benefits. Interested applicants should send a brief cover letter, including a statement of research interests, CV, contact information for 3 references, and copies of transcripts and GRE scores to Dr. Flory (flory@ufl.edu). Posted: 5/12/17.

University of Florida: PhD assistantship in fungal pathogen ecology and epidemiology. The Goss Lab in the Department of Plant Pathology and Emerging Pathogens Institute is looking for a motivated PhD student to study the ecology and epidemiology of emerging fungal pathogens on invasive stiltgrass starting in August 2017. The student will be expected to characterize the fungal community on stiltgrass, determine host range, virulence, and sporulation of multiple Bipolaris species on the invasive and native grasses and the effect of host condition on these measures. The student may also participate in field studies in the Midwest examining pathogen transmission and host competition. More information about the system. The student will be expected to work closely with collaborators Luke Flory (Agronomy), Phil Harmon (Plant Pathology), and Robert Holt (Biology). The student must be detail-oriented and have the desire to work in a collaborative, interdisciplinary environment. A student who has an MS in plant pathology or disease ecology is preferred but not required. Strong English language and scientific writing skills are desired. Interested students should submit a brief cover letter to emgoss@ufl.edu. Include a CV and any peer-reviewed publications. Acceptance to the position is contingent upon acceptance to the PhD program in the Department of Plant Pathology. Inquiries should be made as soon as possible. Applications will be reviewed starting April 14. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Florida: I am seeking a highly motivated M.S. student, starting in August 2017. This student will join a research team investigating the ecology of bats in the Southeast. The student will characterize diets of bats in FL, GA, and AL, using molecular techniques. The second component of investigation could include spatial modeling of bat activity at a landscape scale, or calculating the economic impact of bats as controllers of insect pests. The candidate must have an avid interest in genetic laboratory methods, and must be willing to work unusual hours in the field as demanded by the biology of the bats. An M.S. degree is possible in either ‘Wildlife Ecology and Conservation’ or ‘Interdisciplinary Ecology’. Required credential include a B.S. in wildlife, ecology, natural resource conservation, environmental studies, or a related field; strong quantitative skills and demonstrated writing ability; competitive GPA and GRE scores. Applicants should be highly motivated, willing to work independently and as part of a team, have experience using molecular techniques, experience with GIS, and field experience handling bats and extracting them from mist nets. If interested, send the following materials to holly.ober@ufl.edu: (1) a cover letter briefly describing your research interests, career goals, and why you would like to pursue a graduate degree; (2) a resume; (3) unofficial copies of GRE scores and academic transcripts; and (4) name, phone number and email address of 3 references. There is no need to pursue the official application process through the university until candidate selection is complete. The student will enroll in August 2017. Tuition, stipend, health insurance, and field expenses will be covered for two years from the date of hire. Deadline to apply is 15 April 2017. For more information, contact Dr. Holly Ober (holly.ober@ufl.edu). Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Florida: Applications are welcome for a fully funded PhD graduate studentship in the Scheffers lab of Global Change Ecology and Conservation. I am looking for a motivated student to fill a 4 year PhD position. The Scheffers lab is a multicultural lab with members currently representing the USA, UK, Pakistan, Burkina Faso and Brazil. The student will be part of a team working on canopy science research in the USA and one of the lab’s field sites in either SE Asia, Madagascar, the Neotropics and/or Australia. The student will conduct research in the canopy of temperate and tropical forests on a diversity of taxa including frogs, lizards, ants, and mosquitoes. The student will have flexibility in the taxa s/he chooses and the specific hypotheses that will define his or her thesis but there will be a requirement to conduct physiological research to better understand animals’ tolerance to future climate change. Ongoing themes in our lab include biogeography, physiological tolerance, species interactions, climate change impacts on biodiversity and microhabitat usage. The PhD student is expected to collaborate with an existing team of 3 students and 1 post-doc as well as international collaborators that are affiliated with our lab. Start date: August 2017. Qualifications: The PhD candidate will devote their time to academic excellence and will be required to spend time away from home in the field (working in the USA and abroad). Candidates with an MSc are preferred, however, applicants with a BSc and have peer-reviewed publications in high quality journals may also apply. Students without prior publications will not be considered for this position. Because of the nature of this research, candidates are expected to be independent with significant experience working in the field. Skills in ecological modeling and analysis are desirable. For more information, please see the Scheffers lab website or contact, Brett Scheffers, at brett.scheffers@ufl.edu. To receive full consideration, candidates must send a CV, research statement and the names and contact information of three references to the above email address. Posted: 3/6/17.

University of Florida: Dr. Vanessa Hull is recruiting MS and PhD students to join her new lab group in the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida (Gainesville, FL). The lab group will take interdisciplinary approaches to examine diverse topics in large mammal ecology and conservation around the world. Key topics of interest include (but are not limited to) wildlife ecology in the context of coupled human and natural systems, protected area design and management, endangered species recovery, interactive effects of human impacts on wildlife and their habitats, human attitudes and behaviors toward wildlife and conservation policies, and strategies for managing human-wildlife conflicts in the developing world. Students with a BS in a related field, strong writing and quantitative skills, field work experience, and a passion for wildlife conservation are invited to apply. International students and/or students interested in working internationally are especially encouraged to apply. A competitive salary+tuition package will be offered to selected candidates. To apply, please email Dr. Hull (vhull@ufl.edu) a cover letter describing your interests and experience, a CV, unofficial transcripts, and GRE/TOEFL scores. Posted: 1/16/17.

University of Florida: Dr. Denis Valle, Assistant Professor in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation, is now accepting applications for a PhD Graduate Research Assistantship and a Postdoctoral position. Research in my group focuses on tackling important problems in environmental sciences and public health by creating and using innovative Bayesian statistical models. Additional information on my research can be found here. The position will focus on the development and application of novel multivariate Bayesian methods to understand how anthropogenic drivers alter biodiversity patterns. This NSF funded project builds on our earlier work (Valle et al., 2014. Decomposing biodiversity data using the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model, a probabilistic multivariate statistical method. Ecology Letters) and offers a unique opportunity to work with a highly interdisciplinary team that includes a Community Ecologist, applied Bayesian Statistician, Computational Phylogeneticist, and Computer Scientist. The position will be located at the UF campus in Gainesville, FL. Duties include writing and presenting result of research in scientific conferences, searching and applying for additional sources of funding, and assisting other students within the team on statistical analyses, among others. We expect applicants to be highly motivated, independent, enthusiastic, proficient in computer programming (e.g., R, MatLab, C++) and able to successful communicate research results (i.e., through publications and oral presentations). Requirements for prospective PhD students: background on environmental sciences with experience in (or desire to learn) advanced statistical Bayesian models; or background in statistics with experience in (or desire to learn) environmental sciences; GRE minimum scores of 153 Verbal; 155 Quantitative; Analytical/writing 4 (500/700 old scoring scale) MS degree with GPA exceeding 3.5 The candidate must meet the formal admission requirements for the University of Florida and the School of Forest Resources and Conservation. If interested, please email the items listed below to drvalle@ufl.edu: One page cover letter with a brief review of your research experience, interests and goals, and how they align with those from my lab; CV with contact information; Contact information for three academic references; (only for prospective students) GRE scores; (only for prospective students) Transcripts (unofficial) from all previous colleges and universities. Start Date: August 2017. The application deadline is Jan. 15. Posted: 12/12/16.

University of Florida: The lab of Dr. Basil Iannone in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation is looking for a creative and driven student to work on a project investigating the role of plant diversity and landscape complexity on trophic interactions among arthropods within residential landscapes. Position starts fall 2017. The student will also work with Dr. Adam Dale (Entomology and Nematology Department) and be a member of an interdisciplinary cohort focusing on sustainable and resilient land use. All cohort members aim to inform real-world land management. Required qualifications: A bachelor’s degree in ecology or other relevant field; interests in applied, interdisciplinary research and spatial ecology; and good writing skills. Experience with GIS and statistical analysis, and plant and/or arthropod identification is beneficial, but not required. To apply: Please email: (1) Letter of interest stating your research/career goals and how they overlap with this position, how you would benefit from this opportunity, and how you meet the above qualifications; (2) C.V./Resume; (3) unofficial transcripts; (4) copies of your GRE scores (if taken); and (5) a list of three references who are willing to write letters on your behalf as a single PDF file to biannone@ufl.edu. Please place “trophic” in subject line. Review of applicants will begin immediately. Official transcripts and GRE scores will be required for admittance into the SFRC. Please see the SFRC graduate program for more information, including degree options, and application procedures. Posted: 2/6/17.

University of Florida: Ph.D. Position in the lab of Dr. Basil Iannone in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation (SFRC) starting in fall 2017. The student will contribute to an interdisciplinary cohort focusing on sustainable and resilient land use. Interests within this group are diverse and include community ecology, geospatial analysis, invasion biology, ecological restoration, hydrology, energy conservation, soil science, and big-data analytics. The student will have the opportunity to work with many faculty and stakeholders to develop research that applies geospatial analysis to address two over-arching topics: (1) the impacts of land development on natural areas and (2) how to better incorporate ecosystem services and ecological functioning into future land development. Required: A master’s degree in ecology or other related field; interests in applied, interdisciplinary research and spatial ecology; and good writing skills. Desired qualifications: GIS and statistical experience. Email: (1) Letter of Interest stating your research/career interests, how you would benefit from this opportunity, and how you meet the above qualifications; (2) C.V.; (3) unofficial transcripts and GRE scores; (4) a list of three references who are willing to write letters of support on your behalf; and (5) two representative writing samples (e.g., publications, thesis, reports) on which you are the lead author to Basil Iannone at biannone@ufl.edu. Please place “Interested in Ph.D. Position” in subject line. Review of applicants will begin immediately. Please see the SFRC graduate program for degree options and application procedures. Posted: 12/12/16.

University of Florida: I am currently seeking 1-2 Ph.D. students to join the Crandall Fire Science Lab in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation. Students will be expected to develop their own ideas and interests with a broad ecological framework, engage in empirical research grounded in fire and/or invasion ecology, and apply their findings to management and restoration of fire-frequented habitats of the Southeastern U.S. I encourage applications from students who have a M.S. degree and experience/interest in plant population and community modeling. If you are interested, please send me an email at raecrandall@ufl.edu and include your CV, summary of research experience, brief statement of research interests, and reasons for pursuing a Ph.D. The deadline for applying to the University of Florida for fall admission is January 1, so I encourage prospective students to start a conversation with me as soon as possible. Posted: 11/15/16.

University of Florida: The Smith Fungal Biology Lab and the Hulcr Forest Entomology Lab are recruiting a motivated Ph.D. student to start in Summer or Fall of 2017. We are seeking a student who is broadly interested in fungal systematics, evolutionary biology, and insect-fungi interactions to study ambrosia beetles and their symbiotic fungi as part of an NSF-funded project. We want someone with: • BS or (preferably) an MS degree in biological sciences • A background that includes evolution, systematics, computational approaches and/or fungal biology • Laboratory and molecular biology experience • Appropriate GPA and GRE scores • Solid English language abilities, strong scientific writing, and demonstrated ability to complete projects. The following skills and experiences are desired but not required: • Phylogenetic analysis • Isolation and maintenance of fungal cultures • Background in bioinformatics, computer science, and/or genomics • Peer reviewed publications. Interested students should submit a brief cover letter indicating why they are appropriate for the position along with a CV to Dr. Matthew E. Smith (trufflesmith@ufl.edu). Acceptance for the position is contingent upon acceptance to the to the Ph.D. program in the UF Department of Plant Pathology. Applications must be received by 9 December 2016. Posted: 11/9/16.

University of Florida: We are seeking a highly motivated M.S. student for the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (WEC), starting Spring 2017 or Fall 2017. This student will work as part of a landscape-scale research project on the spatial ecology, population biology, and conservation of Southeastern American Kestrels (Falco sparverius paulus). In Florida, kestrels are listed as Threatened, but the current trend and status are largely unknown. The subspecies is closely tied to upland habitats (e.g., scrub, sand pine, sandhill, prairie, pasture), which have been declining in recent decades. The project offers a unique opportunity to work alongside state biologists and University faculty to conduct research that will directly inform development of habitat management guidelines (HMG) for a Species of Greatest Conservation Need. The project has three primary objectives. However, students with strong initiative and desire to carve out their own research questions within this theme are highly encouraged to apply. Objective 1. Provide a current baseline population estimate and subsequent monitoring protocol for Ocala National Forest, one of the three largest breeding populations of southeastern American kestrels in Florida. Objective 2. Develop HMG for southeastern American kestrels in scrub based on occupancy and productivity in different habitat conditions. Objective 3. Identify common habitat needs as well as potential conflicts associated with managing Florida scrub-jays and other imperiled species in southeastern American kestrel habitat. The student will be co-advised by Robert Fletcher (University of Florida) and Karl Miller (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission). Preferred applicants will be highly motivated, have field experience conducting avian point counts, have strong quantitative skills, and competitive GPA/GRE scores. If you are interested in pursuing a graduate degree on this project, please send Dr. Fletcher a CV, GRE scores and GPA, contact information for three references, and a brief statement of your research interests, career goals, and why you would like to pursue a graduate degree prior to November 18, 2016 (email to: robert.fletcher@ufl.edu). Please see the WEC Graduate Program website for more details on application procedures. Also consult the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at UF for other opportunities regarding graduate admission. Posted: 10/27/16.

University of Florida: The Ernest Lab has an opening for a Ph.D student in the area of Community Ecology to start fall 2017. The student will be supported as a graduate research assistant as part of an NSF-funded project at a long-term research site in southeastern Arizona to study regime shifts (rapid shifts in ecosystem structure and function). This position will participate in data collection efforts in Arizona on rodents and plants. The Ernest lab is interested in general questions about the processes that structure communities, with a particular focus on understanding when and how ecological communities change through time. Students are free to develop their own research projects depending on their interests. Examples of community ecology research that students have pursued as part of their dissertation include: Does strong frequency dependence help buffer rare species from stochastic extinctions?, Are biodiversity patterns sensitive to changes in biotic interactions?, and Do disturbances impact species populations and community-level properties similarly? The Ernest Lab is part of the Weecology research group, Weecology is a partnership between the Ernest Lab, which tends to be more field and community ecology oriented and the White Lab, which tends to be more quantitatively and computationally oriented. The Weecology group supports and encourages students interested in a variety of career paths. Former weecologists are currently employed in the tech industry, with the National Ecological Observatory Network, at teaching-focused colleges, and as postdocs in major research groups. We are also committed to supporting and training a diverse scientific workforce. Current and former group members encompass a variety of racial and ethnic backgrounds from the U.S. and other countries, members of the LGBT community, military veterans, and students who are the first generation in their family to go to college. Interested students should contact Dr. Morgan Ernest (skmorgane@ufl.edu) by Oct 24th, 2016 with their CV, transcripts (unofficial are perfectly fine), and a brief statement of research interests. Posted: 10/11/16.

University of Florida: Ph.D. Opportunity in the lab of Dr. Basil Iannone in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation (SFRC) starting in fall 2017. Student will contribute to an interdisciplinary, cross-departmental cohort focusing on sustainable and resilient land use. Interests within this group include community ecology, geospatial analysis, hydrology, soil science, and analysis of “big data”. The student will also have the opportunity to work with many other faculty and stakeholders on developing interdisciplinary research projects. The student will apply and develop geospatial analyses to investigate topics such as the impacts of land development on remnant natural areas and how to incorporate principles of ecosystem services and ecological functioning into future land development. Required: A master’s degree in ecology or other related field, and interests in applied, interdisciplinary research, spatial ecology, and extension. Desired: A strong background in statistical analysis, GIS, and in writing proposals and publications. Please email: (1) Letter of Interests, (2) C.V., (3) unofficial transcripts, (4) copies of your GRE scores, (5) a list of three references who are willing to write letters of support on your behalf, and (6) two representative publications or writing samples to Basil Iannone at biannone@ufl.edu. Please place “Interested in Ph.D. Position” in subject line. Review of applicants will begin immediately. Please note that official transcripts and GRE scores will be required for admittance into the SFRC. Please see http://sfrc.ufl.edu/academics/graduate for information regarding the SFRC graduate program, including degree options, how to apply, and application deadlines. Posted: 9/13/16.

University of Florida/IFAS: A Ph.D. Research Assistantship is available in the Soil Microbiology Lab (Soil and Water Sciences department) at the University of Florida/IFAS Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC) in Immokalee, FL. Research will focus on examining the interactions of the soil microbial community with agricultural production and crop health. This includes topics such as development and influence of rhizosphere microbial communities, and the effect of biostimulant amendments on the soil microbial community composition and function. The candidate is expected to work in the laboratory as well as in the greenhouse and field. Field and greenhouse work will involve periods of working under hot and humid conditions. The research focus will be on citrus production, but may also include vegetable production systems. Laboratory experimentation will include metagenomics methods and analyses. There will also be opportunities to develop extension experience by providing results to stakeholders. A Master’s degree in soil science, microbiology, plant biology, or a related discipline from an accredited institution and experience in microbial ecology, next-generation sequencing, and/or bioinformatics is preferred. Successful candidates will have a desire to serve the agricultural industry. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Sarah Strauss (strauss@ufl.edu) for additional information. Complete application packets are due Feb. 1, 2017. Posted: 11/15/16.

University of Geneva: An excellent opportunity for a limnology PhD abroad on the lake where the 'Father of Limnology' (Francois-Alphonse Forel) resided and at the department bearing his name - Department F.-A. Forel for Environmental and Aquatic Sciences. Prof. Daniel F. McGinnis is looking for a student to undertake an exciting methane project on Swiss lakes. The PhD is funded for 3 years (possibility of one year extension). Project Background: The “Methane paradox”. Normally produced in anoxic conditions, the occurrence of methane in oxygenated lake surface waters has recently gained attention. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and its oversaturation in the surface water places this climate-relevant gas near the atmosphere. Growing evidence suggests that this phenomenon may be wider-spread than previously assumed, and may contribute significantly to global methane emissions. The project will combine physical and biogeochemical limnological approaches to 1) determine seasonal methane production, 2) isolate key mechanisms, 3) determine regional occurrence and patterns and 4) estimate the contribution to global atmospheric emissions. The successful candidate will implement state-of-the-art equipment and techniques (both in the field and in the lab), perform extended field campaigns and surveys, and utilize simple modeling approaches. For more details, see: facebook and contact Prof. McGinnis at daniel.mcginnis@unige.ch. Deadline: 15 Nov. 2016. Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Georgia: Fully funded graduate student positions (2 PhDs, 1 Masters) are available to participate in a NASA funded landscape ecology and remote sensing project (Carbon Cycle Program) developing remote sensing based GPP products for estimating coastal marsh blue carbon across the Southeastern United States. This project involves data synthesis of remotely sensed data with eddy covariance flux tower products, biomass measurements, and other biophysical coastal marsh parameters. This work involves geospatial analysis of near-surface and satellite data sets (primarily MODIS), as well as field ecology campaigns that will assess the carbon budgets for different coastal landscapes using portable eddy covariance towers, estimation of plant photosynthesis rates, and intensive field sampling. Responsibilities: Graduate students will assist with maintaining and analyzing data from multiple eddy covariance flux towers as well as satellite data . This includes comparisons of eddy covariance measurements with other instruments at the sites, satellite derived products, and data management. Students also will travel monthly to remote coastal marsh sites to maintain equipment, deploy experiments and participate in field data collection. Required qualifications: Candidates must have proven abilities to conduct independent research and to work as part of a scientific team. Experience in data analysis, strong quantitative skills and the ability to work in a marsh environment are also required. Experience in or an interest in learning R or Python also are required. Additional skills in interpretation and synthesis of eddy covariance data, primary productivity and photosynthesis modeling also would be helpful. A strong background in statistics and plant or landscape ecology also are suggested, but the drive and willingness to learn these skills is acceptable. Students will join the Mishra Lab in the Department of Geography at the University of Georgia. The assistantship will include a salary commensurate with education level (M.S. or Ph.D.), tuition waiver, and health benefits. Interested candidates should send an email describing their past experience and their motivation for pursuing a graduate degree, along with a CV, GRE scores, and the names and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Deepak Mishra (dmishra@uga.edu), Dr. David Cotten (dcotte1@uga.edu), or Jessica O'Connell (jessica.oconnell@uga.edu), Department of Geography, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606. Posted: 3/20/17.

University of Georgia: A fully funded four year position for an exceptional doctoral student is available at the Dwivedi Forest Sustainability Lab at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. The incoming student is expected to develop an economic model for analyzing the potential impacts of water markets on land use changes in South Georgia and North Florida. More details of the position. Interested candidates are encouraged to directly contact Dr. Puneet Dwivedi (puneetd@uga.edu) with a cover letter, curriculum vitae, transcripts, and writing samples before applying formally. Applications will be reviewed on first come first serve basis. Puneet Dwivedi, PhD, Assistant Professor (Sustainability Sciences), Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, 180 E Green St Athens, GA. Posted: 2/8/16.

University of Georgia: The Holdo lab at the Odum School of Ecology seeks to recruit a Master’s or Ph.D. student to join an NSF-funded project examining the factors limiting savanna tree recruitment at multiple spatial scales in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. The Holdo lab focuses on understanding the dynamics of tree cover and tree-grass interactions in tropical savannas using a combination of tools, including observational datasets, field experiments and modeling, with an emphasis on model-data integration. The selected student will be encouraged to develop an independent study within the general theme of the project. Interested candidates are should contact Ricardo Holdo at rholdo@uga.edu, and are encouraged to visit the lab website to become familiar with research in the lab. The Odum School of Ecology provides an exciting, dynamic environment for pursuing a graduate degree in ecology, and Athens, GA, known for its lively downtown and highly-rated music scene, and is a fantastic place to live and study. Please note that applications and supporting materials are due soon, on Dec 1, 2016 (information on how to apply). Posted: 11/10/16.

University of Georgia: The Odum School of Ecology (OSE) and the UGA River Basin Center invite applicants for the James Butler and John Spencer Fellowships for Fall 2017 admission to the OSE master’s degree programs. Each of these awards constitutes a paid nine-month research assistantship renewable for a total of two years. For both of these awards we seek exceptional candidates with an interest in freshwater conservation and management. For more information, visit the link above. Deadline: Dec 1, 2016. Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Georgia: we are accepting applications for Fall 2017 for our Integrative Conservation (ICON) doctoral program. Funded assistantships are available to outstanding students. The ICON Ph.D. program is open to students applying to one of four "home departments" including the Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, the Odum School of Ecology, the Department of Anthropology, and the Department of Geography. With the current rate of global change, conservation and management of our natural resources needs to adapt to a complex set of challenges. Responding effectively to these challenges requires both disciplinary expertise and agility to work across disciplines. The University of Georgia's ICON Ph.D. program is designed to meet that need by ensuring that students gain disciplinary depth while also learning to collaborate across fields of practice by engaging faculty from the natural and social sciences to train students in an integrative and holistic way. At the same time, this program strives to move beyond the paradigm of interdisciplinarity by reaching outside of academia to bring together academics and practitioners. Through internships and collaborative research, students will interact with professionals engaged in management and conservation as partners and colleagues. These experiences, along with training modules led by communications experts, will ensure that students learn to communicate effectively and strategically with those from other backgrounds and disciplines as well as with lay audiences. For more information, please contact Nik Heynen, ICON Program Graduate Coordinator (iconphd@uga.edu), at the Center for Integrative Conservation Research (CICR). Posted: 9/21/16.

University of Georgia: Two funded assistantships starting January 2017 will address conservation practices for the gopher tortoise, a species of conservation concern in the southeast. Support will be provided to an M.S. student (2.5 years) to investigate sampling design enhancements to improve population assessment of juvenile tortoises. Support will be provided to a PhD student (3 years) to investigate efficacy of financial incentives to promote habitat and population outcomes on private lands. Full details on both, including qualifications and application instructions. Applications submitted by October 28, 2016 will receive full consideration. Posted: 9/20/16.

University of Georgia: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) and Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources is seeking a Ph.D. student to conduct research focused on the physiological ecology of trees and forest ecosystem processes in the Aubrey Lab beginning fall of 2017. Ideal candidates would already possess extensive field and laboratory experience, proven problem-solving skills, excellent written and verbal communication skills, a solid statistical background, an ability to work both independently and as a productive member of a research team, and motivation to develop, conduct, and publish basic and applied research in the field of forest ecophysiology. Candidates should possess a M.S. degree in ecology, plant biology, or a related discipline. The successful candidate will receive a four year graduate assistantship that consists of an annual stipend of approximately $21k and tuition waiver. The graduate assistantship will have both teaching and research responsibilities—the student will be on a teaching assistantship while completing coursework at Warnell and on a research assistantship while completing research at SREL. Student fees of approximately $1k per semester, which include the matriculation fee and activity, athletic, health, student facilities, technology, and transportation fees will be assessed. If you are interested in this opportunity, please familiarize yourself with Warnell’s admission requirements and deadlines and send a single pdf containing: (1) a 1-2 page statement of your research interests and a summary of your professional career goals that explains why you think working in the Aubrey Lab will help you realize these goals; (2) a current CV; (3) unofficial transcripts showing all previous coursework, degrees, and GPA; (4) GRE scores; and (5) contact information of three references to Dr. Doug Aubrey (daubrey@srel.uga.edu). If selected to compete for this assistantship, you will be encouraged to submit an application to the UGA Graduate School prior to December 31st 2016. Posted: 8/31/16.

University of Groningen: 12 PhD positions in Evolutionary Life Sciences. The University of Groningen has an international reputation as a dynamic and innovative institution of higher education, offering high-quality teaching and research. The Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), the largest institute of the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences fills a special niche in the life sciences by covering and integrating mechanistic, evolutionary and ecological approaches, aiming to understand adaptation on all levels of biological organisation. Researchers pursue fundamental questions while collaborating with partners from industry, medicine and other realms of society. For its new research programme, Adaptive Life, GELIFES is looking to fill 12 Scholarship PhD positions. For more information on available positions, qualification requirements and the application procedure, please consult http://www.rug.nl/research/fmns/themes/adaptive-life/research/phd-projects. More information about the PhD-training programme and scholarship can be found via: https://www.rug.nl/education/phd-programmes/phd-scholarship-programme/. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Hawaii at Manoa: The Carlson Lab in the Department of Natural Resources and Environment (NREM) within the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) seeks applicants for a funded graduate research assistant position. This student will research zero-deforestation commitments in the soybean sector of South America. The position is part of a Social-Environmental SYNthesis Center (SESYNC) funded project led by Kimberly Carlson (University of Hawaii) and Rachael Garrett (Boston University). The student will compile data on soy supply chains and land use change in South America, collate information on supply chain commitments by companies, and develop models to assess the impacts of zero-deforestation commitments in the soy sector using Dinamica EGO software. The student will also join virtual meetings with collaborators from around the world, and travel occasionally to Annapolis Maryland for meetings. The applicant must have expertise in geo-spatial analysis and programming, experience doing independent research, excellent oral and written communication ability, good organizational skills, and strong interest in creating geospatial models. We are looking for someone who is passionate about tropical conservation and is excited to learn new modeling techniques and tools. Individuals who speak Portuguese or Spanish, have lived in South America, have worked for environmental advocacy organizations or industries related to tropical commodities, have published in peer-reviewed journals, or those with experience in Dinamica EGO or other spatial simulation software are especially well qualified for the position. Applicants must meet the minimum requirements for admittance into the NREM graduate program, and should have a bachelor’s degree (if enrolling in the master’s program) or a master’s degree (if enrolling in the PhD program). The selected individual is expected to develop and program geospatial models in Dinamica EGO in close collaboration with the PIs, write up the research results, travel to Annapolis Maryland for team meetings, present research findings at regional and international scientific meetings, seek out and apply for multiple external funding sources each year, and actively participate in lab group meetings and events. The position includes a stipend, and tuition is fully covered by the University of Hawaii. To apply, please send a 2-page cover letter describing how your career goals and experience/qualifications make you an ideal fit for the position. Also attach your CV, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for three references. Send to kimberly.carlson@hawaii.edu. Applications received by December 31, 2016 will receive full consideration. Posted: 12/14/16.

University of Hawaii at Manoa: PhD Assistantship in Ecological-Economic Modeling. The Oleson lab in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management (NREM) within the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) seeks applicants for a fully funded, 3-year PhD position, starting January or August 2017. The project, funded by NOAA, is part of the Pacific Regional Integrated Science and Assessment, an effort to provide management-relevant integrated science to decision makers. The student would join a dynamic Pacific RISA team that includes hydrologists, meteorologists, climate modelers, economists, lawyers, and social psychologists. The objective of the Oleson lab-led project is to evaluate the economic impacts of climate variability and change on ecosystem goods and services on the island of Maui. This student will use ecosystem service modeling and valuation to assess trade-offs and opportunities from climate change, climate variability, and adaptation in Hawaii. The work will integrate spatial biophysical and economic modeling to produce spatially explicit estimates of ecosystem goods and services and their values under alternative scenarios to support management decision-making. The applicant must have strong quantitative biophysical modeling skills (ecology, hydrology), experience in geographical information systems software, excellent oral and written communication skills, and a strong interest in developing new skills. Successful applicants will demonstrate their ability to work independently and as part of an interdisciplinary team as a constructive collaborator. In addition, applicants who have experience in Hawaii, have experience in both ecological and economic modeling, have published in peer reviewed journals, or those with experience in conducting valuation studies and/or interviews are especially well qualified. Applicants must meet the minimum criteria for admittance into the NREM PhD program, and should have a Master’s degree or equivalent level of experience. The selected individual is expected to work with a team to build integrated biophysical-economic models; design and conduct surveys/interviews on the island of Maui (e.g., valuation studies); carefully manage data; submit as lead author or co-author one paper per year to a quality peer-reviewed journal; present research findings at regional and international scientific meetings; seek out and apply for external funding; produce reports and materials required by funders; mentor Masters and undergraduate research assistants; adhere to lab norms (e.g., regarding authorship, data sharing, open communication); and actively participate in lab projects, activities, and meetings. The stipend is ~$25k per year. Tuition is fully covered. To apply, please send a two-page cover letter describing how your career goals and experience/qualifications make you an ideal fit for the position. Also attach your CV, unofficial transcripts, and names of three references. Send to koleson@hawaii.edu. Applications received by November 1, 2016 will receive full consideration for January 2017 admission. If no suitable applicant is found, applications will be accepted until April 15, 2017 for Fall 2017 admission. Feel free to contact Dr. Kirsten Oleson with questions. Posted: 10/12/16.

University of Helsinki: We offer doctoral student position at the University of Helsinki in close collaboration with the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. The doctoral student will work under supervision of Prof. Ram Oren (Duke & UHEL) and Dr. Frank Berninger (UHEL) on the hydraulic conductance of the root systems and its implication for the distribution of soil water and modeling of drought. The position has secured funding for four years, which is the estimated time to obtain a doctoral degree at the University of Helsinki. The doctoral student should start approximately 1 May 2017. Prerequisites are a Master degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. forest or agricultural sciences, earth sciences, biology or physics). Students that can demonstrate that they will obtain a Master before August 2016 will be considered. Assets are prior knowledge of field measurements such as e.g. sapflow, soil and root structure and nutrient and water uptake, and competence in designing and installing automated measurements and data-logging,in addition to the capacity to work quantitatively using statistical or process based models. Applicants that have not studied in English (or not as a degree student at a Finnish University) have to demonstrate a proficiency in English via a recognized examn as TOEFL or IELTS before being admitted to the PhD. The University of Helsinki offers a salary of EUR 2022–2970 per month, depending on the appointee’s qualifications and work experience. No tuition fees for doctoral degrees. Applicants should send a CV, a letter of motivation, copies of Bachelor / Master certificates, possible reprints or publications as well names and contact information for three references. Please attach to the form in a single PDF file (maximum size 16 MB). (1) a letter of motivation which includes the names and contact information of three references (2) your CV (3) a copy of your master degree (4) Possible reprints of publications. You will be asked for the attachment when you save this form. Further inquiries Frank.Berninger@Helsinki.fi or RamOren@duke.edu Please use the link below to upload your CV and letter or motivation. https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/75847/lomake.html. Deadline 7th January 2017. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Hong Kong: China has recently pledged to end the trade of elephant ivory in 2017, which is a great move towards the protection of this threatened species. BUT this could lead to increased trade of elephant ivory immediately across the border, in Hong Kong. We seek one outstanding student to pursue a PhD on this topic in the School of Biological Sciences at HKU. The PhD project will utilize genetics to determine the identity and origin of elephant ivory imported to Hong Kong. Most time will be spent in the laboratory at Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, but part of the research might involve surveys of markets in Hong Kong and field trips to forest sites around Southeast Asia. The student will start at HKU ASAP. The student will be living in Hong Kong, a dynamic city with high diversity of peoples, cultures, and cuisines. Salary is approximately HK$15k (US$1930) per month. More information: Gibson Lab | Luke Gibson | http://www.biosch.hku.hk/researchsra_eco.html [bad link] | prospective students Applicants must have: 1. a Bachelor’s degree in ecology or a related field 2. previous experience with genetics (including the use of microsatellites) 3. strong quantitative skills. Preference will be given to applicants with any publication record. Please send a cover letter describing your research interests and background, a CV including GPA from Bachelor’s (and Master’s, if applicable), and contact information for three references to lgibson@hku.hk. Applications will be accepted through January 31, 2017 - but the sooner, the better. Posted: 1/8/17.

University of Hong Kong: Two PhD positions are available to work on a project examining climate change implications of nocturnality and resource restriction in ectotherms under the co-supervision of Dr. Timothy Bonebrake (The University of Hong Kong) and Dr. Susana Clusella-Trullas (Stellenbosch University). The positions will be based at the University of Hong Kong but research/field work will be conducted in both Hong Kong and South Africa. Applicants should have a strong academic record with previous research experience. Candidates with programming skills (e.g. R, Matlab and/or ArcGIS) are preferred. Knowledge of lizards and/or Lepidoptera is also desirable but not essential. Please send your CV, a cover letter and any questions to Tim Bonebrake (tbone@hku.hk) by Nov 15 2016. Successful candidates will be expected to begin PhD studies Sept 2017. Posted: 11/6/16.

University of Idaho: We are seeking a motivated, ambitious individual to pursue a Master’s Degree with the Strickland Lab. This position will allow the Master’s student to explore a topic aimed at linking microbial community composition to ecosystem processes. Such a topic may include, links between agricultural antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in soil microbial communities; interactions between aboveground and belowground communities; agroecology and soil microbial communities; and the role of microbial communities in leaf litter decomposition. More information. If you have further questions then please e-mail Mike Strickland at strick77@vt.edu. Posted: 5/1/17.

University of Idaho: The College of Natural Resources has several MS and PhD assistantships open for Fall 2017. Current assistantships cover a diverse range of disciplines including: fire ecology, social sciences and policy analysis, natural resource economics, and water resources. Example topics include: adaptation to change in water resources, examining the ecological importance of wildfire refugia, understanding the impacts of drought, wildfire, and other disturbances on communities and the forest products sector, understanding recreational and visitor use of public lands, understanding the ways in which communities adapt and respond to wildfire risk, and understanding different natural resource policy systems and methods of analysis. Several teaching assistantships are also available in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences; Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences; Department of Natural Resources and Society; and in the cross-university Environmental Science Program that is administered by the college. For more information visit: Open RA and TA Positions. Posted: 12/15/16.

University of Idaho: seeks a MSc or PhD graduate student in wildfire ecology. The successful candidate will work with Drs. Arjan Meddens and Crystal Kolden to examine the ecological importance of wildfire refugia. The project is fully funded for 2 years under an award from the Joint Fire Science Program. The successful candidate will be housed in the College of Natural Resources and will analyze field and geospatial data to locate and rank the importance of unburned areas within fire perimeters. Areas that do not burn within fire perimeters can act as fire refugia, providing (1) protection from the detrimental effects of the fire, (2) seed sources, and (3) post-fire habitat for plants and animals. This highly relevant research will aim to improve ecosystem resilience to future disturbances across the larger landscape under rapidly changing climate conditions. Requirements: A strong quantitative background, as demonstrated by courses taken, programming skills, and GRE scores, is required. Field experience and a well-rounded educational background in ecology, geography, and fire science is desired. The position will begin in the Summer of 2017. This position has 2 years of Research Assistant funding available with the possibility of more funding on a similar project following the first two years for PhD students. Annual compensation package is competitive and depends upon degree sought (MS or PHD) and experience. If you like to be considered for the position, please send a letter of interest and a CV to Arjan Meddens (ameddens@uidaho.edu). Posted: 11/8/16.

University of Idaho: The Silviculture Lab (housed within the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences) is seeking a highly motivated candidate for graduate research, preferably at the M.S. level, with an interest in silviculture, forest regeneration, or tree improvement. The student will work on a NSF Center for Advanced Forestry Systems (CAFS) funded project examining the performance of genetically superior western larch (Larix occidentalis) families in the nursery and in a field experiment testing the interacting effects of pure versus mixed-family plantings, site quality, and competing vegetation intensity. The student is expected to begin January 2017. The project is a collaboration between the Inland Empire Tree Improvement Cooperative and the Intermountain Forestry Cooperative at the University of Idaho. Members of these cooperatives included numerous private, state, and federal organizations that the student will interact with through attendance and presentations at annual meetings. Seedlings will be grown at the Franklin H. Pitkin Forest Nursery, which grows more than 400,000 seedlings per year. The Nursery is conveniently located near the main campus in Moscow, Idaho. Outplanting field sites will be located across the Inland Empire (northeastern Washington to the crest of the Bitterroot Mountains). This assistantship includes a stipend for up to 2 years, a waiver of out-of-state tuition for non-Idaho residents, a waiver of in-state tuition and fees, and health insurance. Assistantships require 20 hours per week of work related to research, outreach, and teaching. The student will attend the CAFS annual meeting to present project updates. Required qualifications include at least one degree in Forestry, Ecology, or a related discipline, and an interest in improving regeneration success and forest productivity. The successful candidate will demonstrate an ability to work both independently and as a team member, and be comfortable traveling and working in the field and greenhouse. Applicants must have a valid U.S. driver’s license or ability to obtain one soon after their initial appointment. Additional qualifications include previous research experience and an interest in working with forest landowners and agencies to improve forest management. Interested applicants should send a cover letter detailing their interest in the position, their resume or curriculum vitae, contact information for three professional or academic references, unofficial transcripts, and GRE scores in a single pdf file to Dr. Andrew Nelson (asnelson@uidaho.edu). Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Idaho: Three years of funding is available for a PhD student to study forest responses and vulnerability to climate change and natural disturbances (wildfires and bark beetles) as part of an interdisciplinary NSF-funded project in the Pacific Northwest. The overarching goal of this integrated ecological and socioeconomic project is to support policy and other decision-making processes at the local, regional, and national scales to reduce the risk of wildfire becoming a disaster and increase community and ecological adaptive capacities. Specific objectives include incorporating a model of bark beetle outbreaks into ecohydrology models, determining responses to climate change and management actions, assessing interactions with wildfires, and quantifying impacts to water, carbon, and other ecosystem processes and services. Desirable qualifications include quantitative skills, familiarity with ecosystem modeling and computer programming, excellent written and oral communication skills, and a research-based MS thesis. Students have the opportunity to receive a degree in either Geography or Environmental Science. Outstanding applicants for an MS degree will be considered. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, CV, GPA, GRE scores, and a statement of interest (all materials) to Dr. Jeffrey Hicke (jhicke@uidaho.edu). Inquiries via email or phone (208-885-6240) are welcome. Posted: 8/30/16.

University of Illinois: A position for an M.S. student is currently open in the research team of Dr. Jeffrey Matthews, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. The successful candidate will conduct research on plant community development in restored wetlands and other ecosystems in a study being conducting across four U.S. regions. The ideal candidate will have completed a B.S. degree in ecology, natural resources, or a related discipline, have experience in plant identification, and possess knowledge of the flora of at least one of the following U.S. regions: Midwest, New England, Southwest, Southeast. Prospective students should email a summary of research interests and qualifications, CV, unofficial transcript and GRE scores to Dr. Jeffrey Matthews (jmatthew@illinois.edu). Suitable candidates will be invited to apply to the graduate program in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science. Funding will be available through a combination of research and teaching assistantships. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Illinois: Dr. Jennifer Fraterrigo at the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign is inviting applications for a PhD position that will begin in Fall 2017 for students interested in plant functional traits, biogeochemical cycling and climate change. Students should be interested in examining the following questions at local to regional scales: • How do plant functional traits respond to changes in resource availability and climate? • What is the relationship between above-ground and below-ground plant traits? • How do edaphic conditions influence plant functional traits and their response to changes in climate? • What is the relationship between plant functional traits and biogeochemical cycling? A degree or background in plant ecology, ecosystem ecology, or environmental science is encouraged for applicants, as well as previous experience measuring plant traits and/or biogeochemical cycling. Prospective graduate students will be expected to develop their own research goals, and should be highly motivated. Other desirable qualifications include excellent written and oral communication skills, basic knowledge of quantitative methods in ecological research, an interest in field based research. Prospective students should email a short summary of their research interests as well as a CV, unofficial transcript and GRE scores and percentiles to Dr. Fraterrigo (jmf@illinois.edu) before applying to the program. Funding will be available from a variety of sources, including fellowships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships. Suitable candidates will be required to apply to the graduate program within the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science program. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Illinois: We are seeking a PhD student to develop dissertation research broadly concerned with the responses of mammals to shrub encroachment in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico. The student will collaborate on two related, larger research projects. (1) As part of a long-term study of mesquite encroachment at the Jornada Basin LTER site, the student will conduct occupancy modelling of mesocarnivores across shrub gradients and explore the potential role of top-down forces in structuring desert rodent communities. Data on mammalian carnivore distributions from camera traps (3 years) and rodent abundances from livetrapping (12 years) will be available as a foundation. Developing a comprehensive view of the landscape of fear for rodents could be a study component. (2) As part of a USDA funded project investigating how biodiversity and ecosystem services respond to attempts to restore desert grasslands, the student will examine dispersal constraints affecting site colonization by banner-tailed kangaroo rats, a keystone species. Potential questions could be related to how dispersal syndromes affect landscape connectivity or how habitat selection creates perceptual traps. The student will be advised by Dr. Bob Schooley at the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois, and will also collaborate with Dr. Brandon Bestelmeyer at Jornada Experimental Range/New Mexico State University and Dr. Brad Cosentino at the Department of Biology at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Salary: $24k/year + tuition waver. Qualifications: Applicants should have (1) BS degree (MS degree highly preferred) in ecology, zoology, wildlife biology, or related field; (2) research experience (ideally with mammals) and interests in species distribution modeling, behavioral landscape ecology, dispersal and landscape connectivity; (3) demonstrated abilities in scientific writing and oral communication; (4) strong skills in statistics and GIS, or a strong desire to learn; and (5) willingness to conduct field work in rural, arid landscapes. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is identified. To apply for this position, please send (1) a cover letter, (2) a CV, (3) unofficial transcripts, (4) GRE scores, and (5) contact information for three references. Send all materials in a single PDF attachment to Bob Schooley (schooley@illinois.edu) with the subject header “PhD Assistantship, Desert Mammals”. Start date: January 2017 (some flexibility, summer 2017 possible). Application deadline: 1 October 2016. Posted: 8/30/16.

University of Illinois: We are seeking a PhD student beginning 1/15/17 to develop dissertation research in conjunction with a project funded by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources ($24k/year + tuition waver). The project focus is examining constraints limiting the distribution of the plains pocket gopher and clarifying the subspecies status of Geomys bursarius illinoensis based on spatial genetic structure. The student will conduct species distribution modeling to identify local and landscape factors associated with gopher occurrences (and co-occurrences with American badgers). The student will also develop questions regarding movements and survival of gophers, and depending on interests, investigate landscape genetics and dispersal barriers. The student will be advised by Dr. Bob Schooley at the Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and will also collaborate with Dr. Brad Cosentino at the Department of Biology at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Applicants should have (1) BS degree (MS degree highly preferred) in ecology, wildlife biology, or related field; (2) research experience (ideally with mammals) and interests in species distribution modeling and animal-habitat relationships; (3) demonstrated abilities in scientific writing and oral communication; (4) strong skills is statistics and GIS, or a strong desire to learn; and (5) ability to communicate and interact with rural landowners. Apply by sending the following information in a single PDF to schooley@illinois.edu with the subject “PhD Assistantship, Pocket Gophers”: (1) a cover letter, (2) a CV, (3) unofficial transcripts, (4) GRE scores, and (5) contact information for three references. Application deadline: 9/1/16. Posted: 8/2/16.

University of Illinois at Chicago: Prof. David H. Wise has an opening the Fall of 2017 for a Ph.D. student to conduct research on ecological-evolutionary processes in soil food webs in collaboration with Dr. Jordi Moya-Laraño. The doctoral student will participate in research with the Individual-Based Model Weaver created by Dr. Moya-Laraño, Estación Experimental de Zonas Áridas, and his collaborators at the University of Almería, Spain. The recently created Weaver is a spatially explicit simulation platform (now implemented in C++) to test eco-evolutionary hypotheses about complex ecological networks. The student will earn the Ph.D. through the Ecology & Evolution graduate program in the UIC Department of Biological Sciences. Most of the research will be conducted in Chicago, but the student also will be expected to travel to Spain in order to work directly with Dr. Moya-Laraño and his colleagues at some time during the project. Qualifications: Quantitative skills and basic knowledge of ecology and evolution. Training in quantitative ecology and ecological/evolutionary modeling, statistics, and experience with the computing language R expected. Facility with C++ is desirable but not required. M.S. degree in ecology, computer science or statistics desired, but applicants without a Master’s degree will be considered. For more information and background on the project visit the Wise Lab website. Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Kansas: The Billings lab is seeking a Ph.D. student interested in investigating biogeochemical puzzles in terrestrial ecosystem ecology. We explore fundamental mechanisms governing elemental fluxes in boreal and temperate forests, and temperate grasslands. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to work at multiple research platforms: 1) the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory, where we explore how historic land use and climate interact to drive above- and belowground ecosystem processes in intact forests and forests re-growing on former agricultural land; 2) the Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect, where eastern Canadian boreal forests exposed to varying mean annual temperature grow in otherwise similar conditions (part of the Critical Zone Exploration Network); and 3) the KU Field Station, where land holdings represent successional forest stages, native prairie, and restored grasslands. We emphasize the importance of elucidating fundamental mechanisms driving patterns in terrestrial ecosystems as they regenerate following disturbance and respond to climate and land use change. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to interact with a diverse group of interdisciplinary researchers, assist with the development of CZ science, and become part of an energetic and driven group of researchers working to understand interactions between life and its abiotic surroundings. For details, please contact Sharon Billings at sharon.billings@ku.edu, after visiting the lab's web page (link above) and reading instructions for great ways to express interest. Posted: 9/27/16.

University of Kansas: The Burgin Lab is seeking applicants for M.S. and Ph.D. students (to start in Fall 2017) focused on exploring the intersection between aquatic biogeochemistry and microbial ecology. Successful applicants will describe previous research experience in aquatic or ecosystem ecology, field work or lab chemistry analyses. Applicants should also demonstrate previous writing and data analysis experience. Experience with managing undergraduate researchers, large datasets (e.g., generated by sensors) or working as part of a collaborative team are a plus. Students will apply through KU’s Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Students will be funded on a combination of grants and teaching support; EEB provides 10 semesters (Ph.D.) or 4 semesters (M.S.) of support on admission to the department. Tuition and travel support are also generally available to admitted EEB students. Answers to frequently asked questions about financial support, requirements and life in Lawrence. Prior to applying, please contact Amy Burgin (burginam@ku.edu) with your C.V. and a brief note on your interests in getting a graduate degree (more details). Details on how to apply to the department. The completed application includes: the university form, C.V., Graduate Interest Statement, 3 Letters of Recommendation, GRE scores and proof of English proficiency (for non-native speakers). The deadline for applications is 1 December 2016. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Kentucky: The Van Cleve Research Group in the Department of Biology is currently recruiting Ph.D. students to join the lab in Fall 2017. The lab in generally interested in quantitative and mathematical approaches to evolutionary biology and ecology. Past and current research areas include social evolution and other topics in evolutionary ecology, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and bet-hedging, and epigenetic processes including genomic imprinting (see publications). Additionally, the lab aims to be broadly interdisciplinary across complex biological systems from the molecular to metapopulation scales and welcomes applicants interested in quantitative approaches and with diverse backgrounds including (but not limited to) mathematics, physics, computer science, and economics. The exact research project topics for potential students are flexible, though interested individuals should contact Jeremy Van Cleve (jvancleve@uky.edu) with a CV and short statement of interests before applying. Apply to the Department of Biology Graduate program, and see admission guidelines. Stipend, tuition, and medical insurance, are covered as part of a teaching assistantship and research assistantships and fellowships are competitively available. Questions about the Biology Graduate program can be sent to the Director of Graduate studies, David F. Westneat (biodfw@uky.edu). Applications should be received by January 1st for full consideration. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Konstanz: We are seeking an excellent student for an ambitious PhD project on belowground functional traits of plants as drivers of biodiversity and ecosystem functions. The major objectives of this project are (1) to determine the contribution of belowground root-trait diversity to ecosystem functioning, and (2) to assess the contribution of functional root traits to global and regional commonness and local abundance of plant species. We plan to do this by assessing root traits for a large number of central European grassland species, and relate them to measures of species commonness and abundance and ecosystem functions as measured in the Biodiversity Exploratories. This project will be done in collaboration with PD Dr Judy Simon at the University of Konstanz, and Prof. Matthias Rillig and a PhD student in his group at the Free University of Berlin. Our project will include large greenhouse experiments, in which we will use imaging software to measure root morphological traits, stable-isotope feeding experiment to measure nutrient uptake efficiencies and microscopy to measure mycorrhization. Advanced statistical analyses will be applied to address the research objectives mentioned above. The successful candidate should have an interest in plant ecology, and particularly in plant functional diversity. She or he should have strong writing and statistical skills. The position will be funded for three years (pending final confirmation by the DFG), and the salary will be at scale 13 TV-L (65%). The position should start in March or April 2017. The Ecology Group is young and very international, and works on a wide range of topics, including among others mating system evolution, plant responses to global change and determinants of plant invasiveness. If you are interested in this position, send a PDF with the the following contents to mark.vankleunen@uni-konstanz.de: • a motivation letter (why do you want to do a PhD?, why this one?, why in this group?) • your CV • the contact details of two references • a writing sample (e.g. a publication that you wrote, the abstract and introduction of your Master thesis). Merge all these documents into a single PDF, and include your name in the file name (for example: Smith_John_Application.pdf). The application deadline is 15 January 2017. For more information, contact mark.vankleunen@uni-konstanz.de. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Konstanz: The Research Training Group “R3 – Responses to biotic and abiotic changes, Resilience and Reversibility of lake ecosystems” funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) and based at the University of Konstanz welcomes applications for up to 15 PhD Positions for a three-year structured program. The RTG will start on 1 April 2017. The scientific goal of this RTG is to study the mechanism resulting in the resilience of lake ecosystems to environmental change. Our approach is to study the response of a model system – Lake Constance – with a multitude of different approaches and from different viewpoints, i.e., combining classical and novel methods such as population genomics and metagenomics approaches, metabolic profiling, compound-specific stable-isotope analyses, comparative multi-species experiments, paleo-limnological and resurrection ecology approaches, time-series analyses, and numerical simulation models. The RTG will use these methods to study lake responses in three tightly linked research areas: Response, resilience and reversibility of (1) ecosystem structure, (2) biotic interactions, and (3) carbon and nutrient flows. We offer a structured doctoral qualification programme combining a mentoring program, specific lectures on research and applied questions in ecology and limnology, a seminar and visiting program among students, flexible one-week courses, transferable skills courses, visits by guest researchers, and annual retreats. Furthermore you can expect a highly stimulating research environment. Further information about the Doctoral positions, and the scientists involved can be found at the link above. Deadline: 9 January 2017. Posted: 12/12/16.

University of Louisville: Two Ph.D. positions in plant chemical and molecular ecology are available starting Summer/Fall 2017 in the Department of Biology. The Frost Lab studies plant stress ecology from genes to metabolomics to ecological interactions. Successful candidates will learn how to design and conduct studies to expand our knowledge of the remarkable capabilities of plants to tolerate or resist environmental stress. An unflappable curiosity of the nature of plants is essential. Previous experience with molecular biology, chemical ecology, computer programming and scripting languages, and analytical chemistry will be helpful but not necessarily required. A Master’s degree in plant biology is favorable. To apply for the initial selection, please email the following documents with the subject “UofL Chemical Ecology PhD” to Dr. Christopher Frost (chris.frost@louisville.edu): (1) a cover letter explaining your interest and qualifications, (2) a resume or CV, (3) unofficial copies of transcripts, (4) and all applicable test scores, and (5) names and contact information for three academic references. Review starts immediately; for full consideration, a completed application should be received by December 1, 2016. Successful applicants will be expected to complete the application for admission to UofL by January 2017 to be eligible for the prestigious University Fellowship program. The Frost Chemical Ecology Laboratory encourages and promotes diversity in our group; all qualified applicants are encouraged to apply. Please contact Dr. Frost with any questions. Posted: 10/23/16, revised: 11/16/16.

University of Maine: A graduate (MSc) position is available to work in Alessio Mortelliti’s lab focusing on the response of small mammals (mice, voles, shrews and squirrels) to forest management practices. The goal of the study is to contribute to providing a mechanistic understanding of mammalian responses to silvicultural practices and to understand how these responses affect the process of seed predation. This will include conducting a series of experiments to measure how individual characteristics of small mammals (e.g. health status, personality, fitness) affect seed predation in the context of a large scale capture-mark-recapture study. The ideal candidate would have a strong passion for field work, strong quantitative skills and an interest in teaching. Required qualifications: Bachelor's degree in wildlife ecology, biology or a closely-related field and a minimum gpa of 3.0. Preferred qualifications: strong organizational skills, physical capability and endurance, experience in conducting field research (preferably on small mammals). The assistantship position includes a stipend (the candidate is expected to work as a TA at least 3 semesters), 50% of the student health insurance, and tuition paid for the graduate program at the University of Maine. Expected start date June 1st 2017. If you are interested please send your application as a unique pdf file including: 1) a cover letter that outlines your qualifications for the project (focusing on skills mentioned in the candidate profile and preferred qualifications) and career goals, 2) Curriculum vitae 3) GRE scores 4) an unofficial transcript. Send the document to Dr. Alessio Mortelliti (alessio.mortelliti@maine.edu). Applications will be reviewed beginning January 30, 2017. Posted: 1/7/17.

University of Maine: Drs. Amanda Klemmer and Brian Olsen are looking for a graduate student to investigate the community and food-web ecology of intertidal, rockweed-dominated (Ascophyllum & Fucus spp.) habitats in light of commercial rockweed harvesting. The candidate could pursue either a M.S. or Ph.D. degree starting in Orono, Maine in January 2017. In conjunction with partners at the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, and the National Park Service, the project’s objective is to assess linkages between rockweed, the invertebrate community, and coastal bird populations in a changing, multi-use landscape. The successful candidate will possess a strong academic record, field experience, and the ability to identify common invertebrate orders of the intertidal zone. Preference will be given to candidates with experience supervising field crews; building partnerships with industry, governmental agencies, non-profits, and public stakeholders; managing databases; and constructing statistical models (or interest in gaining such an experience). An enthusiasm for cold temperatures, wet feet, curious landowners, the bold beauty of the Maine coast, and other blessings of field work is required. Interested candidates should email the following materials to amanda.klemmer@maine.edu and brian.olsen@maine.edu: a curriculum vitae, unofficial transcript, GRE scores, a scientific writing sample, and contact information for three references. Consideration of candidates will begin on November 10th. Posted: 10/28/16.

University of Maine: A position is open for a Master's student to join my research group in the School of Biology and Ecology in Fall 2017. My lab studies the ecology of infectious diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. The research topic will broadly address the effects of landscape and/or climate change on arthropods of medical importance in Maine's Midcoast and Downeast regions using a combined lab/field approach, with specific research questions and hypotheses determined in discussion with the student. The most important prerequisites to joining the lab are experience with and enthusiasm for conducting field work and openness to developing new scientific skills (e.g., experimental design, molecular techniques, the analysis and presentation of quantitative data). Research assistant support is available from the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station for at least one semester, and teaching assistant support is guaranteed for the duration of the graduate program (course assignments may include Basic Biology, Biology of Organisms, and General Entomology). Applications submitted prior to 15 January 2017 also may be considered for UMaine fellowships. The student may be admitted through the program in 1) Ecology and Environmental Science, 2) Entomology, or 3) Zoology depending upon his/her interests and professional goals. Please send inquiries to Dr. Allie Gardner (allison.gardner@maine.edu) by 1 November 2016 with the following to ensure consideration: 1) Cover letter discussing your interest in graduate study in ecology and relevant coursework and research experience; 2) Names and contact information for three references; 3) Writing sample (e.g., an undergraduate paper or lab report of ~5-10 pages in length, which does not necessarily need to be related to biology). Allison M. Gardner, School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, 310 Deering Hall, Orono, ME 04469. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Maine: A Ph.D. research assistantship is available through the Ecology & Environmental Sciences Program in the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture, School of Food and Agriculture. The student will develop and conduct research on the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases in wildlife and domestic animals using genetic approaches. Research topics may include the investigation of: (1) eco-evolutionary drivers of transmission and spillover, (2) host-pathogen adaptation, (3) the genetic basis for heterogeneity in host susceptibility, and (4) disease transmission pathways using genetic data. This position will involve interdisciplinary research with strong field, laboratory and analytical components. Data collection may require international fieldwork (depending on the choice of research topic). The student will have the unique opportunity to be part of the new interdisciplinary Center for One Health & the Environment and have the potential to collaborate with the UMaine Animal Health Laboratory. Salary: $19k annual stipend, tuition waiver (up to 9 credit hours/semester, 1 credit hour in summer), 50% health insurance. Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in biology, ecology, evolution, microbiology, immunology, epidemiology, genetics, bioinformatics, or a related field. Preferred candidates will have a Master’s degree or equivalent experience and be accomplished in writing, statistics, molecular methods, population/ phylogenetic analyses, and field skills. How to Apply: Interested qualified applicants are encouraged to email a cover letter, CV/resume, unofficial transcripts, writing sample, and the names and contact information for three references to Pauline Kamath (paulinekamath@gmail.com). Expected Start Date: January 17, 2017. Last Date to Apply: September 4, 2016. Pauline Kamath, Ph.D., College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture, School of Food and Agriculture, University of Maine, Orono, Email: paulinekamath@gmail.com. Posted: 8/30/16.

University of Maryland: Support is available in the Johnson lab for a Doctoral (preferred) or Master of Science student in urban forest ecology. The successful applicant will join a project that supports urban forest management decision-making by testing both ecological theory and science-based management approaches in urban environments, synthesis of multiple long-term data sets describing biophysical and social variables, and increasing information connectivity networks. The successful applicant will assist in these efforts and develop a thesis that contributes to the project. Demonstrated skills in plant identification and/or analysis of large data sets are preferred, as is a Master’s degree for those seeking to earn a doctorate. The University of Maryland faculty includes experts in a broad range of related fields, including urban forestry, landscape architecture, ecology, soil science, environmental science and policy, and many specialties in biology. The University is affiliated with the National Center for Socio-Environmental Synthesis. See additional information about UMD and the Plant Science Graduate Program of the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture. Send a CV, unofficial transcripts, and a personal statement detailing research interests, motivation, and relevant experience via email. Review of applications will begin immediately. A summer 2017 start may be possible for a highly qualified applicant. Contact: Lea R. Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Maryland, 2134 Plant Sciences Building, College Park, MD 20742. (301) 405-1602 Office, leaj@umd.edu. Posted: 2/8/17.

University of Maryland: The Swenson Lab is seeking to add a new Ph.D. student to begin in the fall of 2017. We are looking for a student interested in conducting highly interdisciplinary research working with concepts and techniques from forest ecology, transcriptomics, physiological ecology, and demographic modeling. Previous experience with quantitative analyses in ecology and/or genetics are preferred, but are not a requirement. A passion for and dedication to research are essential as is an integrative approach to tackling big problems. The researcher would be a part of a larger project in the Swenson Lab that recently received NSF funding, but the student would be encouraged and expected to develop novel avenues of investigation that can leverage the design, samples and data generated from the larger project. The student would also be expected to assist in field research at two study sites: Harvard Forest & the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. The lab is located in the Department of Biology with a Ph.D. student concentration in our Behavior, Ecology, Evolution and Systematics program. Existing collaborations with the Smithsonian, particularly with the Center for Tropical Forest Science and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, our proximity to the National Museum of Natural History and collaborative relationships with the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center in Annapolis allow students in the lab to interact in a broader scientific community in the DC area. If you are interested, please email Nate Swenson (swenson at umd dot edu) with a brief statement of your interests and research experience, GRE scores if available, GPA and list of biology, statistics, and/or mathematics courses taken. Students from under-represented groups in ecology and evolution are particularly encouraged to apply. Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Maryland: Urbanization is transforming landscapes at a global scale, but patches of forest and other habitats persist and regenerate in cities. Despite their small size, these habitat patches are disproportionately important to both local biodiversity and human well-being. Their managers are faced with a uniquely urban set of problems to solve. Support is available in the Johnson lab for a Doctoral (preferred) or Master of Science student interested in addressing these challenges. Post-doctoral research is also a possibility via joint development of a proposal led by the potential postdoc to a National Center for Socio-Environmental Synthesis post-doctoral fellowship program (pre-screening application deadline October 24). The successful applicant will join a project that aids urban forest management decision-making by 1) synthesis of multiple long-term data sets describing biophysical and social variables; 2) increasing information connectivity networks; and 3) testing science-based management approaches. The successful applicant will assist in these efforts and develop a thesis using project-generated data. Experience with collaborative groups will be helpful. A master’s degree or experience demonstrating management, analysis, and synthesis of large data sets is preferred. The University of Maryland faculty includes experts in a broad range of related fields, including urban forestry, landscape architecture, landscape management, ecology, soil science, environmental science and policy, and many specialties in biology. Competitive support, including health benefits for students and their dependents, is available. Send a CV, unofficial transcripts, and a personal statement describing your research interests, motivation, and relevant experience. All students must apply to the Graduate School; the deadline for Spring 2017 is October 1. Additional details about the Plant Science Graduate Program of the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture For more information, contact: Lea R. Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Maryland, 2134 Plant Sciences Building, College Park, MD 20742, (301) 405-1602 Office, leaj@umd.edu. Posted: 9/20/16.

University of Maryland: PhD or MS student assistantships are available to work in Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman’s lab to develop field and lab research projects focusing on abiotic and biotic drivers of ecosystem function in urban environments, with a particular emphasis on linking soil quality, urban hydrology, and ecosystem services. The lab investigates biogeochemical and ecohydrologic responses of green infrastructure, urban soils, and urban forests, and collaborates with hydrologists, engineers, landscape architects, geographers, and planners. Applicants should have a degree in ecology, environmental science, soil science, geography, or closely related field (an MS degree is required for the PhD program). Lab and/or field experience in soils, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem ecology is required. Experience with sensors and data loggers, ecosystem service assessment, GIS, statistical analysis, or remote sensing would be an advantage. Successful applicants will be self-motivated and able to work well in teams. The students would be enrolled in the Department of Environmental Science and Technology at the University of Maryland. See information on application and program details. Assistantships include a tuition waiver, stipend, and health benefits - the students would start in Fall 2017. To apply, please contact Dr. Pavao-Zuckerman (mpzucker@umd.edu) with your CV, unofficial transcript(s) & GRE scores, and a short statement describing research interests and career goals. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: The Gugger Lab is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student to develop a dissertation project on ecological genomics of trees. The lab uses next-generation sequencing approaches to understand how populations of long-lived trees respond evolutionarily to environmental change, the molecular basis of local adaptation, the factors influencing population divergence, the role of hybridization in adaptation and speciation, and implications for conservation under global change. The ideal applicant will have prior research experience in population genetics or plant ecology/evolution, molecular laboratory skills, strong quantitative skills, and interest in learning basic bioinformatics. A Master’s degree is preferred, but not required. The Ph.D. student will matriculate through the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Sciences (MEES) Graduate Program at the University of Maryland, College Park but will reside at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg (western MD) for the duration of the degree. Three years of support are available through research assistantships, with additional support through competitive teaching assistantships and fellowships. Starting date can be as soon as January 2017 and no later than August 2017. If interested, please email Paul Gugger (pgugger@umces.edu) a single PDF containing (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, and (3) contact information for three references. Please indicate “Genomics PhD position” in your subject line. Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: The Zhang Lab at UMCES is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student interested in investigating the interactions between food production and global environmental change with data-driven approaches. The student would have the opportunity to design his/her own topic of investigation related to food security, agricultural production, climate change, and/or global nitrogen and carbon cycles. In addition, the student will be able to work closely with modeling development groups at Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton and Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD) in France. The Zhang lab has been using interdisciplinary and data-driven approaches to examine strategies for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environment degradation, and climate change. Ongoing research projects include modeling the impact of agricultural production on global nitrogen cycle and assessing the environmental and economic trade-offs between expansion and intensification of agriculture production. The successful candidate will have working knowledge of the biogeochemical and biophysical processes of the earth system, strong quantitative skills, and proficiency in at least one basic programming language (e.g. Matlab, R, FORTRAN). Prior research experience in environmental science and policy is desirable. The position is based at the UMCES Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg, Maryland and comes with a highly competite stipend and benefits package. Three years of support are available through research assistantships, with additional support possible through competitive teaching assistantships. Finalists for the position will also be encouraged to apply for fellowships through UMCES. The student will matriculate through the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Sciences Program (MEES) at the University of Maryland, College Park and will reside at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg for the duration of the project. Frostburg is a small college town in the mountains of western Maryland, providing abundant outdoor recreational opportunities. To apply, please email Xin Zhang (xin.zhang@umces.edu) a single PDF containing (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, and (3) contact information for three references. Please indicate “Food and the Environment PhD position” in your subject line. Review of applications will continue until a suitable candidate is found, with starting dates available as soon as September 2016 and no later than September 2017. Posted: 9/23/16.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: seeking a highly motivated doctoral or master’s student interested in interdisciplinary research in agro-ecosystems. This new project focuses on water management and greenhouse gas fluxes at a farm on the Delmarva Peninsula. Our team of researchers (Eric Davidson and Horn Point Laboratory GIS Group) will be studying the impact of water table management through drainage on greenhouse gas fluxes (methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide), on nitrate and phosphate leaching, and on socio-economic returns for farmers and society. We seek a student who will focus mostly on micrometeorological measurements of nitrous oxide and methane fluxes and who will contribute to the integrated team effort of this project. The ideal candidate must have experience with eddy covariance or gradient flux measurements. Knowledge and experience in micrometeorology, soil biogeochemistry, hydrology, and programming using ‘R’ are highly desirable. A master’s or bachelor’s degree in a related field of the natural sciences (e.g. Environmental Science, Agronomy, Meteorology, Geography) is preferred. Information on the UMCES graduate program. The student will reside at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg (western MD). At least three years of support are available through a research assistantship, with additional support possible as needed. The preferred starting date is January 2017. To apply, please by email to Eric A. Davidson (edavidson@umces.edu) a single PDF containing (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, (3) undergraduate and graduate school transcripts (unofficial copies are OK at this point); and (4) contact information for three references. The successful candidate will be invited to formally apply to the UMCES graduate program during the month of September 2016. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: The Gugger Lab at UMCES is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student to develop a dissertation project on ecological genomics of trees. The lab uses next-generation sequencing approaches to understand how populations of long-lived trees respond evolutionarily to environmental change, the molecular basis of local adaptation, the factors influencing population divergence, the role of hybridization in adaptation and speciation, and implications for conservation under global change. The ideal applicant will have prior research experience in population genetics or plant ecology/evolution, molecular laboratory skills, strong quantitative skills, and proficiency in or interest in learning basic bioinformatics. A Master’s degree is preferred, but not required. The Ph.D. student will matriculate through the Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Sciences (MEES) Graduate Program at the University of Maryland, College Park but will reside at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg (western MD) for the duration of the degree. Three years of support are available through research assistantships, with additional support through competitive teaching assistantships and fellowships. Starting date can be as soon as January 2017 and no later than August 2017. To apply, please first email Paul Gugger (pgugger@umces.edu) a single PDF containing (1) a statement of interest, (2) a CV, and (3) contact information for three references. Please indicate “Genomics PhD position” in your subject line. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Massachusetts—Amherst: PhD Graduate Research Assistantship available in the Keiluweit Lab. Research Project: Organic Matter Mineralization and Metal Cycling During Flood Plain Evolution We are inviting applications for a fully funded PhD positions in the Soil and Microbial Biogeochemistry group. The successful candidate will conduct research into the biogeochemical cycling of organic matter within floodplains. The overarching goal of this research is to decipher the coevolution of organic matter and metal chemistry within the dynamic floodplains, and its resulting determinant of soil carbon storage and metal contaminant fate and transport. This research is focused on the East River watershed in Colorado, where a legacy of mining has left floodplain soils contaminated with uranium and other metals. The candidates will combine experiments in laboratories with field sampling and long-term monitoring to examine the key microbial processes responsible for the cycling of carbon and associated metals. Candidates will have the excellent opportunity to apply cutting-edge synchrotron-based spectroscopy/microscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular biology techniques to study the microbial transformations of carbon and metals. This research will be conducted in collaboration with a supportive team of scientists at Stanford University, the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and the Environmental Molecular Science Lab. Qualifications: Applicants with B.S. and/or M.S. degrees in soil science or a related field (environmental science, geoscience, microbiology, or environmental chemistry) are encouraged to apply. We expect the student to have a general interest in fundamental biogeochemical mechanisms in soils, and to creatively integrate his or her own ideas within the broader framework of the project. Application: Interested candidates are asked to send their CV, copies of Bachelor and/or Master degrees (including academic transcripts), and a list of two potential references (including full contact addresses). These materials, and inquiries for further information, should be sent to Dr. Marco Keiluweit (keiluweit@umass.edu). Posted: 6/30/16, revised: 10/28/16.

University of Melbourne: Biocontrol of the Vegetable Leafminer. Masters (or PhD) opportunity with Prof Ary Hoffmann (Bio21 Institute, the University of Melbourne), Dr Peter Ridland (Honorary Fellow, the University of Melbourne) and Dr Paul Umina (Bio21 Institute, the University of Melbourne and cesar), to help control the vegetable leafminer, a major quarantine threat for our food production systems.This project will identify candidate parasitoid wasps for the biocontrol of VLM through a combination of literature reviews and field collections of agromyzids and their parasitoids across Australia. The project is expected to include a significant field work component, largely within key agricultural production areas of southern Australia, but with the potential to travel to the Cape York Peninsula. An interest in taxonomy and/or molecular methods would be ideal. Scholarship support of $7,500 per annum and ALL funds to support research and fieldwork costs included. To apply contact Prof Ary Hoffmann (ary@unimelb.edu.au 03 8344 2282) or Dr Paul Umina (pumina@unimelb.edu.au 03 9349 4723). More info. Posted: 5/31/17.

University of Memphis: Fully funded PhD assistantship in fungal and microbial ecology. I am looking for one PhD student to start January 2018 to join the Brown Lab in the Department of Biological Sciences. In the Brown Lab, we use a cross-domain approach (Fungi, Bacteria, Archaea, Algae, etc.) to ask questions about how communities are structured, how microbe-microbe or microbe-host interactions influence assembly, and how these communities play a role in ecosystem processes. Research questions are open, but may include: snow algae-microbe interactions and function, isolation and characterization snow-borne and alpine fungal and microbial communities, or microbial successional dynamics after glacier retreat. Preferences given to candidates who have a strong background or interest in the following: next-generation sequence generation and analysis – including command line based analyses, familiarity with Fungi (as well as bacteria), and a strong sense of curiosity. If interested, please contact me (Shawn Brown) at spbrown2@memphis.edu with “Memphis PhD position” in the subject line. Include in the email (in PDF or .docx format) a short description of your interests, experience, and career goals that includes undergraduate (and graduate if applicable) GPA. Also include a CV/resume, GRE scores. Applications will be screened as received and a Skype interview may be invited soon thereafter. Posted: 3/20/17, revised: 6/9/17.

University of Mississippi: Graduate Student Research Assistantships in Aquatic Ecology. The Resetarits Lab has openings for highly qualified MS or PhD students as a Doherty Research Assistant in Freshwater Biology. These are 12 month Research Assistantships in the Department of Biology, providing full 5 years of support for PhD. students, and 2 full years for MS students. Current stipend is 22 (MS), 25-28 (PhD.)/year, with health insurance, and full tuition remission. Recipients are expected to design and implement independent dissertation projects (empirical and/or theoretical) at the interface between community, behavioral, and evolutionary ecology in freshwater systems, or at the freshwater/terrestrial interface, as well as participate in ongoing projects. Current studies in the Lab address a variety of questions, including the role of habitat selection in the assembly of communities and the dynamics of metacommunities, the role of diversity and species interactions in community assembly/ecosystem function, life history evolution in amphibians and insects, and biochemical, behavioral, evolution and community dynamics of chemical camouflage. Study organisms include amphibians, aquatic insects, other aquatic invertebrates, and fish, while focal habitats range from small ephemeral ponds to headwater mountain streams. Funding for past and ongoing research has come primarily from NSF, along with EPA/NASA, and the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Foundation. Profile and Recent/representative papers. The Resetarits Lab is based in the Department of Biology and housed primarily at the University of Mississippi Field Station (UMFS), approximately 11 miles from the main campus in Oxford. The Lab has outstanding space and facilities and access to over 200 experimental ponds and wetlands at the UMFS (check us out on Google maps), hundreds of mesocosms of various sizes for experimental work, and dedicated field vehicles. The Department of Biology has an organismal focus, including a dynamic and growing group of ecologists and evolutionary biologists. For more information contact me. To begin the application procedure, please attach a letter of interest, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, and resume (including contact information for 3 references) to Dr. William Resetarits (wresetar@olemiss.edu). Posted: 1/8/17.

University of Mississippi: Graduate assistantships are available to support Masters or PhD students in the Hom Lab at Ole Miss. We are generally interested in understanding how biotic and abiotic factors facilitate the formation, persistence, and evolution of species interactions, notably those that are symbiotic. We are particularly fond of studying interactions involving fungi and algae and use a predominantly synthetic approach to address our questions (see Science 345:94-98). Our lab is seeking bright, highly motivated, and disciplined students with an appetite for discovery and adventure to join us in pursuing research projects of mutual interest in areas that include (but are not limited to): experimental evolution, synthetic ecology, Eco-Evo-Devo, eukaryotic metagenomics, bioinformatics, applied microbiology, and the ecology and biodiversity of microbial consortia in both laboratory and field contexts. We offer students substantial flexibility to define their own research project(s) and/or to contribute to one or more ongoing projects in our growing research portfolio. Members of our lab come from all over the world and we are deeply committed to community outreach and the continual expansion of our international collaborations (e.g., see http://mycophygolife.org). Stipend support will be a combination of research and teaching assistantships, and includes tuition waivers and health benefits. The desired start date for these positions is August 2017. We strongly encourage women and underrepresented minorities to apply. Those with a particular interest in STEM education and outreach within an underserved region are also highly encouraged to apply—there are great opportunities to serve. For consideration and/or more information, please contact Dr. Hom (erik -at- olemiss.edu), +1-662-915-1731) preferably before January 15, 2017. Requirements for graduate admissions can be found at: http://biology.olemiss.edu/. To apply, please send a single PDF file that includes: 1) a cover letter explaining your specific research interest(s) and qualifications/research experience, 2) your curriculum vitae, 3) a scientific writing sample, 4) school transcript(s), 5) GRE scores (note: quantitative and verbal scores should each be >150), and 6) contact information for at least 3 references. Posted: 11/21/16.

University of Missouri: A Master of Science graduate research assistantship is available with Dr. Mitch Weegman in the School of Natural Resources. This project will utilize data collected from hybrid Global Positioning System (GPS) and acceleration (ACC) tracking devices fitted to greater white-fronted geese in Europe and North America to answer fundamental questions in movement ecology related to life history differences underlying white-fronted goose subspecies, and linked with their demographic rates and population trends. This work is a collaboration between researchers at the University of Missouri, Texas A & M University-Kingsville, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (UK), University of Exeter (UK) and Aarhus University (Denmark). Prerequisites: Ideal candidates will have an undergraduate degree in statistics, wildlife ecology or a closely related field, and interpersonal skills to lead discussions among collaborators. Preference will be given to those with a strong quantitative background (e.g., experience with Program R, machine learning algorithms, Bayesian methods), knowledge of waterfowl ecology and management, and field experience (e.g., handling birds). Competitive applicants will have an undergraduate GPA > 3.4, quantitative GRE scores that average in the 70th percentile or higher, and a GRE analytical writing score > 4.0. Students must have a valid driver’s license. The successful applicant will be expected to publish manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and present papers at scientific meetings. Salary ~$18k per year, with an expected annual increase, health insurance and course waiver (i.e., the student will not pay tuition). Start date: January 2017. Last date to apply: October 7, 2016. To be considered for this position, please send the following (preferably as a single PDF) to Dr. Mitch Weegman (weegmanm@missouri.edu): 1. Letter of interest summarizing your experience, 2. Curriculum vitae or resume, 3. College transcripts (unofficial are fine), 4. GRE scores (unofficial are fine), 5. Contact information for three references. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Montana: The Priscu Research Group is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student to work with Dr. John Priscu on the aquatic systems in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica as part of the McMurdo LTER project. This six-year interdisciplinary project extends 24 years of previous data collection on the permanently ice-covered lakes of the region and will focus on biogeochemical responses to changes in landscape connectivity and climate. The successful applicant will be expected to interact with technicians, graduate students and PI’s in Antarctic fieldwork. The successful applicant must also pass the medical and dental exams required by NSF for Antarctic deployment. A Master’s degree in ecosystem modeling, aquatic biogeochemistry, or microbial ecology is desirable. Interested students should contact Amy Chiuchiolo, Montana State University, Bozeman (achiuchiolo@montana.edu) and include a brief statement of interest. Posted: 3/7/17.

University of Montana: Applicants are sought to a new NSF-funded graduate traineeship, UM BRIDGES: Bridging Divides across the Food, Energy, and Water Nexus. Fellowships are available for PhD and MS students in STEM disciplines, including in the Departments of Ecosystem & Conservation Sciences, Geosciences, Society & Conservation, Economics, Environmental Studies, and Forest Management. Fellows will receive stipend, tuition waiver, and research support (travel, supplies); take coursework on the food-energy-water (FEW) nexus and workshops to develop professional and research skills; participate in other NRT activities; and conduct disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in consultation with their graduate advisor. General research themes may include but are not limited to FEW issues and tradeoffs in river and rangeland systems; energy transitions and implications for agriculture and water; drought management in the face of climate change uncertainty; and tribal and indigenous issues at the FEW nexus. Students will be based in and apply to participating departments. Additional information, including contact information for participating faculty and application requirements, can be found at http://www.umt.edu/bridges/. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Montana: A PhD assistantship is available for Fall (or spring) 2017 to pursue a project focused on modeling predator-prey dynamics of large carnivores and ungulates in multi-prey, multi-predator systems in the Rocky Mountain west. The student will work with Idaho Dept of Fish and Game to develop mathematical/statistical models of predator-prey systems and apply them to different study areas with different densities of predator and prey species. Opportunities for fieldwork could be developed, but we anticipate this project will be primarily focused on testing hypotheses using existing datasets. The student will be advised jointly by Dr. Angela Luis and Dr. Mark Hebblewhite, and funding for this project will be provided by IDFG and the University of Montana. Required qualifications include M.Sc./M.A. in wildlife biology, ecology, conservation biology, mathematics/statistics, physics or related field; outstanding work ethic; exceptional quantitative skills and motivation; demonstrated excellence in oral and written communication and interpersonal skills. Preferred qualifications include experience working with wildlife management agencies, with dynamical and statistical models, mathematical biology, R, GIS, scientific writing, and spatial modeling. To apply, send cover letter summarizing interest and relevant experience, resume/CV, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores, and contact information (including phone and email - letters not required yet) for 3 references to Dr. Angela Luis (angela.luis@umontana.edu), Wildlife Biology Program, University of Montana. Start date is flexible—Jan 2017 or Aug 2017. UM Wildlife Biology Program application deadline is Jan 15, 2017. Top candidates will be contacted by Dec 31st, 2016, and directed to apply for admission to the UM graduate school. Posted: 11/10/16.

University of Montana: PhD student opportunities in Ecology & Conservation. The lab of Dr. Jedediah Brodie is looking for enthusiastic and talented students for two PhD positions to start in September 2017. Applicants need to be strongly self-motivated but also able to work as a team, and must have substantial experience in ecology or conservation work. Experience with GIS, other spatial analysis, or computer modeling is desirable. The projects are flexible, but will be roughly along these lines: 1) Landscape connectivity for wildlife movement and conservation in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Connectivity between habitat patches has long been known to be important, but an explosion of recent conceptual development is greatly enhancing our ability to understand this critical topic. The general idea of the project is to assess how dispersal across large landscapes can best be maintained for multiple species, and how such dispersal affects species persistence and community structure. The details will be worked out as the student begins the program and takes ownership of the project. We will seek to combine many existing large datasets (e.g. from camera traps, GPS collars, habitat data, citizen science information, etc.) from researchers, NGOs, and government agencies, potentially using and even developing new modeling tools to understand multi-species connectivity. There may be a field work component, dependent on funding and need. 2) Climate change in Alaska. High latitude regions are changing rapidly, and not always in predictable ways. This project will build on work that Dr. Brodie and collaborators have started in Denali, to look at drivers and consequences of large-scale habitat changes such as treeline advance. The project could include some or all of the following factors: (i) experiments to assess the impacts of animal herbivores on tree- and shrub-line change, (ii) drone-based surveys of plant and animal community changes, (iii) modelling of large mammal responses to climate and habitat changes using existing data from federal collaborators, and (iv) other aspects developed by the student. Substantial field work and camping experience is required for this position, ideally from remote, difficult, and dangerous settings. Experience in Alaska, specifically, is highly desirable. These positions could be based in either Biological Sciences or the Wildlife Biology Program, depending on funding sources and the student’s background and career goals. Funding for these projects will come from a combination of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and grants led by the student (but with help on the application from Dr. Brodie). To apply send an email to jedediah.brodie@mso.umt.edu, with “PhD position application” (no quotes) in the subject line, by 1 November 2016. Include as attachments: (1) A 1-2 page cover letter stating which project you’re interested in, explaining why you’re interested in and prepared for that position, and listing your undergrad and/or MSc institution and GPA, your GRE scores, names & contact info for 3 references, and your TOEFL score if applicable. Do not send transcripts, reference letters, or other materials at this time. (2) Your CV. Posted: 9/26/16.

University of Montana, University of Idaho, University of Wyoming, and Kansas State University: We are seeking enthusiastic and curious graduate students to join a new research project studying the causes and consequences of wildfire activity in Rocky Mountain subalpine forests over the past 2500 years. Two PhD (4-yr) and two MS (2-yr) positions are available for this highly collaborative project involving field work in subalpine forests in Montana and Colorado, analysis of lake-sediment cores, and ecosystem modeling. Students will be based at one of four institutions: Univ. of Montana, Univ. of Idaho, Univ. of Wyoming, or Kansas State Univ. Potential research projects will focus on vegetation and fire history in the Northern Rockies, synthesizing existing paleorecords in the Southern Rockies, developing paleoclimate records, developing biogeochemical proxies from new and existing records, and ecosystem modeling. Prior experience in these topics is not required. Qualifications:  BS or BA, or MS (preferred, for PhD students) degree in ecology, biology, Earth sciences, geography, geology, or related field.  Field work experience; experience working in remote settings is an asset.  Research experience including quant. analysis; computer prog. in Matlab or R is an asset.  Strong verbal and written communication skills; publication record is an asset. To apply: Interested students should contact Dr. Philip Higuera (philip.higuera@umontana.edu) for further information. Please include (1) a brief description of your research interests and relevant experience, and (2) a resume or CV that includes your undergraduate/graduate GPA and GRE scores (with percentiles). Potential advisors include Dr. Higuera, Dr. Tara Hudiburg (thudiburg@uidaho.edu), Dr. Kendra McLauchlan (mclauch@ksu.edu), and Dr. Bryan Shuman (bshuman@uwyo.edu). Further steps will include applying to the graduate school at the relevant university, as soon as January 2017. Successful candidates could start in June 2017. Posted: 12/15/16.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Graduate student opportunities in community and/or ecosystem ecology: Plant community ecology of Tibetan grasslands. This project is located in Gansu province, China. Compared to grasslands worldwide, Tibetan grasslands have an extremely high level of plant diversity, averaging 30-40 species per 0.25m2. In contrast to other grasslands, forbs can represent up to 95% of NPP. This unique high alpha, high beta diversity and large functional group dominance differences make Tibetan plateau grasslands an ideal system to examine mechanisms driving plant diversity and plant species coexistence. The Tibetan plateau is also characterized by intense above- and belowground herbivory and a long evolutionary history of grazing. We hypothesize that this intense herbivory by a large array of different herbivores is an important factor driving plant diversity. For this project, a Master’s degree in ecology and a working knowledge of Chinese are preferred. Fire, deer browsing and nitrogen additions impacts on ecosystem. This project is at Cedar Creek, LTER in Minnesota. Community and ecosystem patterns are driven by environmental drivers, and drivers such as fire, herbivory and atmospheric nitrogen deposition have changed. This project uses a three factorial experiment (fire, deer fencing and nitrogen fertilization) to examine community and ecosystem consequences of such changes. Both projects, require an interest in community and ecosystem ecology and an undergraduate degree in ecology, or a closely related field. If interested, please contact: Johannes (Jean) M H Knops, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, 348 Manter Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588,, Phone (402) 817 6957, Email: jknops2@unl.edu. Posted: 8/30/16.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: M.Sc. opportunity with Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit within the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The successful candidate will explore spatiotemporal relationships between recreational anglers and fish populations within a social-ecological context across Nebraska reservoirs. Access to a long-term historical Nebraska standardized creel survey and fish population database, participation in collecting contemporary creel survey data, and development of online surveys will be required to address project objectives. Individuals with broad interests within a social-ecological framework are encouraged to apply. Collaboration with agency, academic, and general public entities will be required. Must be highly motivated, possess excellent communication skills, and willing to work on weekends and holidays. To apply, please email a single document including a brief letter of interest, CV, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, and three references and their contact information to Dr. Mark Kaemingk (mkaemingk2@unl.edu) and Dr. Kevin Pope (kpope2@unl.edu) with “MSc Assistantship” in the subject line. We anticipate a January 2017 start date with review of applicants beginning in September. Posted: 6/2/16.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas: A PhD Assistantship position is available in the School of Life Sciences. The successful student will be supported through a combination of RA and TA positions. The student will become part of a vibrant, interdisciplinary research team investigating the evolutionary genetics, ecology, and behavior of Hawaiian picture-winged Drosophila in Dr. Donald Price’s laboratory. The student will enroll in the PhD program in Biological Sciences with a start date for the position of August 2017. Project Summary - The spectacular diversity of the ca. 120 species of Hawaiian picture-wing Drosophila display highly divergent behavioral, ecological and morphological traits. The overarching goal of this project is to determine the functional genomics underlying adaptive radiation for three Hawaiian picture-wing Drosophila species. Recombinant inbred lines between D. silvestris and D. heteroneura and between D. silvestrisand D. planitibia will be created and the genomes of each line sequenced. RNA-seq analysis will be conducted in targeted tissues to analyze the tissue-specific gene expression profiles and phenotypic traits will be measured that differ between species that play critical roles in adaptation, reproduction and reproductive isolation between species. The combined analysis of genome sequence analysis, RNA-seq profiling and phenotypic trait analysis in these recombinant lines will allow for an understanding of the role of structural genomic and gene expression in the development and expression of phenotypic traits important in adaptive divergence. The graduate student will be engaged in each phase of this project with a focus on analyzing the genomes and phenotypic traits in the recombinant lines. The graduate student will be expected to develop independent research projects. The student must meet admission requirements to the PhD program of the School of Life Sciences. Additionally, to be considered for this position, the student ideally will have: a) completed a master’s degree or graduated by August 2017. Someone with a Bachelor’s degree with extensive research experience may qualify; b) performed laboratory or field research in evolutionary or behavioral genetics as part of master’s degree research; c) published (or in prep.) one or more manuscripts from a research project from master’s degree research or other research. The student should be self-motivated, able to work in teams, and have an interest in working and living in southern Nevada and being part of UNLV graduate and research programs. Interested candidates should email me (donald.price@unlv.edu) the following: (a) 1-page statement of interest outlining your background, coursework, research and publication experience including laboratory and fieldwork, research interests and career goals; (b) CV or resume including undergraduate and Master’s degrees and GPA, list of relevant coursework, and employment and professional experience; (c) names and contact information of three academic or professional references. In your email, please use a subject line of: Hawaiian Drosophila UNLV PhD Position Application (your name). We will contact applicants directly for further consideration. Posted: 1/3/17.

University of Nevada, Reno: PhD Graduate Position in Climate, Land Use and Wildlife Research. The Interdisciplinary Climate Research Lab in the Department of Geography, led by Dr. Douglas Boyle and Dr. Scott Bassett, is recruiting a Doctoral student interested in pursuing multi-disciplinary climate research with us and our collaborators at the University of Maine and Desert Research Institute. The research will focus on the use of downscaled climate models and land use change scenarios to determine potential future impacts on native fauna in the Southern California region. With the limited extent of natural communities near the Southern California coast, need has arisen to better understand the nexis of climate, land use, and species distribution in a non-stationary world. The prospective student will be integrated with a collaborative group of researchers working on a host of climatic topics in arid and semiarid regions of the world. Research will be conducted in close collaboration with Dr. Scott Bassett. Applicants with scientific backgrounds in climate, geography, planning or ecology and an interest in computer modeling and interdisciplinary research are encouraged to apply. Financial support is available through a likely combination of teaching and research assistantships. Health insurance and partial tuition waivers are also provided. If interested send a Curriculum Vitae, unofficial transcripts, GRE scores and a personal statement (1-2 pages) describing your previous research experience and future research interests to Dr. Scott Bassett (sbassett@unr.edu). Applicants will also need to submit an application to the Geography Ph.D. program. Applications will be reviewed as material is received and potential candidates should have all material sent to Dr. Scott Bassett by January 15, 2017. For full consideration the official application and all associated material must be completed/received by February 1, 2017. Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Nevada, Reno: Graduate Research Position in Mountain Ecohydrology. We invite applications for a Ph.D. student to fill a research assistantship in the Graduate Program of Hydrologic Sciences. The exact nature of the research project will depend on student interests. Typically research involves combing field, remote sensing, and modeling efforts. Quantitive background, including computer coding in R, Python, or MATLAB, is strongly encouraged. Experience traveling over snow is desirable (but not required). More information can be found at the link below. To discuss the position please contact Dr. Adrian Harpold with a CV and a letter stating your interests and college GPA and recent GRE scores. Posted: 10/27/16.

University of Nevada, Reno: MS and PhD opportunities are available in evolutionary endocrinology and urban physiology. The Ouyang lab is looking to recruit a MS and/or PhD graduate student to join our lab in fall 2017. Students interested in evolutionary physiology, light pollution, and/or urban ecology are strongly encouraged to apply. The MS position is in biology, and the successful candidate will examine individual variation and plasticity in the stress response both in the field and the lab. The second position is in the EECB (ecology, evolution, conservation biology) program, and the candidate will look at the effects of urbanization on behavior and physiology. Candidates will have the opportunity to work on a nest box population of house wrens and house sparrows as well as on a captive, breeding population of sparrows. Students with bird handling, animal husbandry, and/or neuroendocrine lab experience are encouraged to apply. Interested candidates should send an email to jouyang@unr.edu with a CV and a cover letter. Posted: 10/27/16.

University of New Brunswick: I (Dr. Ben Speers-Roesch) have a MSc or PhD position available in my marine ecophysiology lab in the Department of Biological Sciences. The successful applicant will explore the thermal physiology and overwintering strategies of fishes. The position is available to start September 2017 but this is flexible. See the full ad (pdf) for details. Preference will be given to applications received by May 31, 2017. Posted: 5/5/17.

University of New Brunswick Saint John: The Houlahan lab is looking for a Ph.D. student interested in fundamental questions in population and/or community ecology to begin in the fall of 2017 (although later start dates could be negotiated). We are happy to hear from students with a wide range of interests - some examples of topics include (i) the relationship between diversity and stability, (ii) the relative importance of density dependent effects on population dynamics, and (iii) the stability of competitive hierarchies in nature but we are less concerned about the question than the approach. The approach would involve developing theoretical and/or statistical models that would then be tested on new data (see Houlahan et al. 2017 in Oikos) to assess the predictive ability of those models and how predictive ability changes over time and space. The successful applicant will have strong quantitative skills, and more particularly, be somebody who is comfortable analyzing data and modeling in something like R or Python. Students will have an opportunity to improve their analytical and modeling skills, become better grounded in basic ecology theory, and improve writing, logical thinking and problem-solving abilities. We are interested in ecology, environmental science, computer science and/or mathematics students. Funding of at least $21k/year is guaranteed for 4 years and comes from TA’ships, RA’ships and scholarships. The Houlahan lab is part of the Department of Biological Sciences and The Canadian Rivers Institute at the Saint John campus. This is a vibrant department with a focus on aquatic and marine biology and more than 50 graduate students. If you are interested in the position drop me a note at jeffhoul@unb.ca and attach your cv, transcripts (unofficial or official) and 3 references with contact info. Expiry date: July 1, 2017. Posted: 2/22/17.

University of New Hampshire: I have an open position for a M.Sc. or Ph.D. student in Soil Biogeochemistry/Microbial Ecology. My lab examines how soil organisms interact with their environment to regulate agroecosystem productivity and ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling, organic matter turnover, and trace gas emissions. While we use a range of fundamental laboratory methods, which include molecular chemical and microbiological approaches, we always have an eye towards applying our results to improve ecosystem processes and management. The student's research area may be in line with other lab projects but is flexible depending on student interests. Potential areas of inquiry could include seeking an understanding of 1) how plants and microbes interact to acquire N from organic pools through priming; 2) the potential for cover crops to enhance soil communities and soil health by diversifying agroecosystems; 3) the resilience of microbial communities and plant productivity to variable precipitation; 4) soil biogeochemical modeling, including microbial-explicit modeling of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling; and 5) the role of soil food webs in soil organic matter dynamics. I'm very open, however, to new directions if you have ideas. I also am open to accepting students from non-science and non-traditional backgrounds that are interested in changing career directions, and are motivated to create a more sustainable planet, starting from the ground up. The position start date is flexible but preferably fall semester 2017, or by January 2018 at the latest. Please contact Stuart Grandy with your interests if this position sounds like a good fit, stuart.grandy@unh.edu, with "graduate student 092017" in the subject heading. Posted: 3/20/17.

University of New Hampshire: The Garnas lab seeks a highly motivated graduate student (MSc or PhD – MSc preferred) for a USDA-APHIS funded project on the ecological factors influencing parasitism rates and long-term efficacy of one of the key biocontrol agents of the Emerald ash borer (Tetrastichus planipennisi). The position will be housed in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment and begins at the start of the Spring semester (January 2017). Interested applicants, please send: - a CV - a brief summary of research interests and any relevant experience - contact information for three references as a single pdf file to jeff.garnas@unh.edu. Posted: 11/6/16.

University of New Hampshire: The Rowe lab is looking for a PhD student to participate on an NSF-funded interdisciplinary project examining herbivore effects on ecosystem function. This is a field intensive project conducting mark-recapture surveys on voles and lemmings in Alaska with sites on the Seward Peninsula, in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range (i.e., Arctic LTER site at Toolik Lake), and on the arctic coastal plain near Barrow. Research will focus on population density, home range, and resource use with flexibility to explore related questions based on student interest. An MS degree in biology, ecology, natural resources, or related field is preferred, though applicants without an MS degree, but with relevant research experience, will be considered. Field experience is desirable, especially familiarity live-trapping small mammals. Applicants must be able to begin in May 2017. Prospective students are encouraged to email Rebecca Rowe (rebecca.rowe@unh.edu) a brief summary of their research interests and experiences as well as a CV (including GPA and GRE scores), in advance of applying to the program. The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment is part of an interdepartmental Ph.D. program in Natural Resources & Earth Systems Science (NRESS). The program has an emphasis on interdisciplinary training in environmental and earth sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and policy. See link above for details about the program and the application process. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of New Mexico: The Earth Systems Ecology Lab is recruiting 1-2 PhD students to begin fall 2017. Current research topics in the lab include: understanding factors controlling post-wildfire tree establishment, quantifying the influence of changing climate and wildfire on tree species distributions and carbon dynamics, and quantifying the influence of forest management activities on forest carbon dynamics. Student support will include some combination of teaching and research assistantships and only US citizens/legal residents will be considered. Preference will be given to students with a quantitative background. If you are interested in being considered, send your CV, a one-page statement of research interests, unofficial transcripts, and unofficial GRE scores to mhurteau@unm.edu. Review will begin on 7 November. Posted: 10/11/16.

University of North Carolina Wilmington: The is currently recruiting for the Fall 2017 cohort in the Masters of Science in Environmental Studies program. Deadline for Fall 2017 is April 15. Our non-thesis program is an exciting, interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on linking classroom experience with hands-on fieldwork, culminating in a semester-long internship/practicum with an environmentally-related organization. Our program is both challenging and rewarding, with a high degree of collegiality among students and faculty. MS concentrations are available in: -Coastal Management -Environmental Conservation and Management -Marine and Coastal Education -Environmental Education and Interpretation An Individualized Concentration is also available for those who wish to design their own curriculum in conjunction with faculty. Be sure to watch our short video about the program with student testimonials: For questions or additional information, please feel free to contact Dr. James A. Rotenberg, Graduate Program Coordinator, rotenbergj@uncw.edu. Posted: 4/3/17.

University of North Dakota: The Department of Earth System Science and Policy is accepting applications for prospective students seeking a Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.), or a Ph.D. Degree. This is an interdisciplinary department which focuses on the sustainability of environmental-human interactions within the greater context of the Earth System. The primary areas of faculty mentored research includes: glaciology and glacio-hydrology, agro-ecology, renewable energy, geomorphology, public policy, environmental economics, Earth systems modeling, and geospatial analysis. These topics can be tailored to fit graduate student research interests and the possibility of tuition waiver is available. Students from a wide range of fields are encouraged to apply, such as Biology, Climatology, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, and Hydrology, as well as Economics, Policy, and Political Science. For prospective students interested in applying, please contact Dr. Jeff VanLooy (Graduate Director) (701-777-4755, jvanlooy@aero.und.edu). Please see the UND Graduate School for application instructions. Recommended deadline for application is February 1st however, early applications will receive top priority for admission and possible tuition waiver. Posted: 9/28/16.

University of Northern British Columbia: We are seeking two M.Sc. students to work on projects that examine different aspects of forest-climate interactions. A growing body of science involving both measurement and modeling suggests that rising greenhouse gases and climate change will influence the composition and dynamics of northern conifer forests. These shifts are projected to alter tree growth and forest development, and potentially impact the forests ability to store carbon and provide other ecosystem services. We are seeking students interested in examining the mechanism underlying how tree and forest development will be influenced by climate shifts, and exploring the concomitant impacts on carbons storage and other forest ecosystem services. Project 1: evaluate how individual tree growth is influences by site-specific growing conditions and experienced climate variables over short (daily) and intermediate (monthly, yearly) periods. The student will evaluate environmental conditions in the field and measure trees growth response using dendrometer bands. The objective of this project is to advance our understanding of how tree growth is influenced by within season climatic variation so that we will be able to better project forest development under future climate conditions. This project would benefit from the applicant having a good foundation in tree physiology or plant biology, and an interest in organismal science. This research project will provide the opportunity to undertake both field work and computer modelling. Strong quantitative skills, familiarity with statistical model fitting, and experience modeling in R or Python will be beneficial. Project 2: investigate above ground carbon dynamics in sub-boreal forests in British Columbia’s interior plateau. Using a combination of remotes sensing data (aerial LiDAR) and field based surveys the student will evaluate carbon sequestration and carbon stock changes at the UNBC Aleza Lake Research Forest over the past decade. Detailed plot-based carbon stock measurements and LiDAR data were initially acquired in the mid 2000’s, and acquired again in 2015. We would like to understand the stock changes over this interval, and how environmental factors influence carbon accumulation in trees at different stages of development. This project will require familiarity with forests, and specific training in GIS and spatial modeling of landscape level data over time. Ideal candidates will have a strong forest ecology background and be interested in understanding how forest dynamics are impacted by environmental conditions. Strong quantitative skills and experience conducting data analysis and modeling in R or Python would be beneficial. Successful applicants will be working with Dr. Ché Elkin and Dr. Art Fredeen in the Ecosystem Science and Management program. Two years of guaranteed funding are available for each of these positions. The preferred start date for the positions will be September 2017, with the potential for a May 2017 start. More information. Interested students should contact Ché Elkin (che.elkin@unbc.ca) for further information on these research opportunities. Applicants for these positions are asked to send a letter of interest, detailed CV, transcripts, and names of 3 references to Dr. Ché Elkin (che.elkin@unbc.ca). Posted: 10/13/16.

University of Northern Colorado: Graduate positions (MS or PhD) in Plant Conservation Genetics in the lab of Dr. Mitchell McGlaughlin and Community Ecology in the lab of Dr. Scott Franklin, School of Biological Sciences. We are seeking MS or PhD students interested in plant conservation genetics, habitat restoration, and/or community ecology. Research in the McGlaughlin lab is focused on using population genetics to inform conservation plant conservation and management. Research in the Franklin lab focusses on disturbance ecology at the community level. We are currently recruiting two MS or PhD students to be involved in a Bureau of Land Management funded project examining the genetics of plant habitat restoration. Specifically, we are interested in how seeds sourced from different geographic areas impact the success of sage brush restoration. This project will leverage genetic and field data to determine how local a provenance is required for maximum restoration success. One student will be predominantly responsible for genetic questions, while the other student will be responsible for field-based analysis of germination, establishment, and community development of plots seeded with different plant accessions. The selected students will work closely with each other and the PI’s, and will gain experience with both field and lab techniques, including extensive fieldwork in northwestern Colorado. Funding is available to support graduate students through teaching and research assistantships during the academic year and summer research stipends. We are looking for students to start in Summer or Fall of 2017. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest and CV to Dr. Mitchell McGlaughlin (Mitchell.mcglaughlin@unco.edu) or Dr. Scott Franklin (scott.franklin@unco.edu). To apply, students will need to submit a complete application to the UNC Graduate School. Posted: 1/23/17.

University of Notre Dame: The Jeff Feder lab in the Department of Biological Sciences has a graduate student position available for studying the genomics of ecological adaptation and speciation in insects. Our research has both laboratory and field components, spanning the realms of ecology and evolution from experimental manipulation studies to high throughput DNA sequencing, focused on discerning the adaptive basis of speciation and its genomic underpinnings. Ideally, we seek individuals with experience in bioinformatics and candidates with past research experience (e.g., in a master’s program), for the position. However, all highly motivated students are encouraged to apply. The Department provides graduate students with generous stipend support and benefits. To apply please e-mail a CV, personal statement of interest, and contact information for three references to feder.2@nd.edu. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Notre Dame: The McLachlan Lab is looking for one or more PhD students interested in how rapid evolution in a coastal sedge species has affected the ecosystem dynamics of salt marshes. Differences in the phenotypes of plants recovered from seed banks dating back over 100 years are large enough to alter ecosystem properties like carbon sequestration and the stability of marsh surface elevation. Our lab uses Bayesian data assimilation to make joint inference about these changes based on field measurements, controlled experiments, and mechanistic models of ecosystem processes. The project is also associated with a large training exercise for undergraduate researchers. Applicants should have interest and proficiency in one or more of the following: ecological modeling; Bayesian statistics; plant growth & physiology; and/or undergraduate research training. To learn more, contact Jason McLachlan (jmclachl@nd.edu) and Jody Peters (peters.63@nd.edu). Applications are due by December 1st. Posted: 10/28/16.

University of Oklahoma: A MS or PhD assistantship is available to study fish biodiversity in small rivers and streams in the Ozarks and Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma. The student will join the Neeson lab in the Dept. of Geography and Environmental Sustainability. The project is funded by the Oklahoma Dept. of Wildlife Conservation and is aimed at assessing the status and trends of fish communities in the region, as well as their relationships to ecosystem stressors (e.g., habitat loss and fragmentation). The project complements ongoing work in our lab and in the department focused on interactions between freshwater ecosystems and transportation infrastructure, and there is considerable room for the student to develop novel research directions along these lines. Strong candidates will have experience with standard field methods for sampling fish communities in wadeable rivers and streams; experience with GIS and project data management; the ability to supervise a small team of two undergraduate field assistants; and excellent writing skills. Anticipated start date is August 2017. To apply, please send a cover letter, CV, GRE scores, and contact information for three references to neeson@ou.edu by January 15, 2017. Posted: 11/29/16.

University of Oklahoma: A MS position is available in the Neeson lab, beginning January 2017. The student will join an interdisciplinary team of researchers examining the growth of road networks through time in Oklahoma, the effects of roads on ecosystems, and the role of the natural environment in determining patterns of road network growth. We welcome applications from students with an interdisciplinary background, and there is considerable room for the student to determine the direction of the project. Strong candidates will have experience in GIS, programming or statistics, excellent verbal and written communication skills, and the ability to collaborate within an interdisciplinary team. The student will be supported with a teaching assistantship (stipend, tuition waiver and benefits) and based in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability at OU, a growing department with five faculty hires in the last three years. To apply, send a single PDF with CV, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, a brief statement of research interests and goals, and contact information for three references to Dr. Thomas Neeson (neeson@ou.edu). Please apply by Oct. 15 for full consideration. Posted: 9/23/16.

University of Oregon: The Department of Biology and the Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IE2) seek outstanding applicants for the PhD program. We are looking for highly motivated students who wish to develop high-caliber research programs in any area of ecology and evolutionary biology. IE2 consists of a dynamic, energetic, and highly interactive group of faculty members, graduate students, and postdocs whose research interests are world-renowned and span traditional disciplines. Particular strengths of the group include evolutionary genetics and genomics, evolution of development, and microbial, population, community, and ecosystems ecology. IE2 consists of faculty from multiple departments on campus, including Biology, Anthropology, Math, and Geography. In addition, IE2 maintains close ties with other research institutes and departments on campus, including the Institutes of Molecular Biology and Neuroscience, the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, and the Departments of Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, and Landscape Architecture. Our integrative approach to research and graduate education is supported by numerous grants, training grants, and fellowships from both federal and privately-funded sources. For more information about IE2 and individual faculty research interests, please see the IE2 website (linked above) as well as individual lab websites. For information about graduate studies in the Department of Biology, or to submit an online application, please see: http://biology.uoregon.edu/graduate-studies/apply/. The deadline for online applications is December 1, 2016. For specific inquiries about IE2, contact Matt Streisfeld (mstreis@uoregon.edu). For inquiries about the graduate application process, please contact the Biology Department Graduate Program Manager, Jessica Wilson (wilson21@uoregon.edu). Posted: 9/28/16.

University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras: Graduate Assistantship in the Large-scale Dynamics of Tropical Mountains mediated by Landsliding. I am seeking a graduate student interested in conducting research at the interface between Ecology and Geomorphology. The research project is aimed at understanding how variation in soil fertility through its effect on plant attributes that contribute to soil stability may influence landsliding from local to regional scales. The project combines field and laboratory analytical work, extensive GIS/RS, modeling, and use of tree rings to examine the causes and consequences of landsliding in the Sierra de Las Minas, a mountain range in eastern Guatemala. The student can start participating in the project during our 2017 summer field campaign. The ideal candidate will have a B.Sc. or M.Sc. in Ecology, Environmental Science, or a related field; experience with GIS/RS; a strong quantitative and statistical background; an interest in combining field with laboratory work. The 3-year assistantship includes stipend, tuition, and benefits. Interested candidates should contact me ASAP and send their Curriculum Vitae (with GPA and GRE scores) as well as Personal and Research Statements. If you are interested in this opportunity contact Dr. Carla Restrepo (crestre@hpcf.upr.edu) to receive additional information, including admission requirements and instructions on how to apply. The deadline for application to the Biology Graduate Program at UPR RP is January 30. Posted: 1/16/17.

University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue: A MSc position is available in the intensive silviculture lab at UQAT beginning January 2017. Working within the Forest Research Institute, the student will use an experimental design in the field to study the influence of soil temperature on growth and root development of white spruce (Picea glauca) and black spruce (Picea mariana). The latter is known for better tolerating cold and wet soils. A scholarship over two years is available. I seek students who are curious, passionate about trees, forest ecology and tree biology, have good academic records and can understand at least a bit of French. Preference will be given to students with prior research experience and good writing skills. Interested candidates should apply by email (annie.desrochers@uqat.ca) and send: 1) a motivation letter describing their educational background and research experience, research interests, and educational and career goals, 2) a CV/resume, and 3) the names of three references by October 3rd, 2016. Annie DesRochers, PhD, Professeur-Chercheure, Institut de Recherche sur les Forêts, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 341 Principale Nord, Amos, Qc, Canada, J9T2L8, Tel:1-819-732-8809 ext 8327. Posted: 9/23/16.

University of Regina: I seek a motivated individual with interests in forest ecology and airborne remote sensing for an MSc project investigating forest canopy structure across a semi-arid “island” forest landscape in the Canadian prairies. Water availability can have a strong bearing on the structure, biomass, and carbon balance of forests. Relationships between soil moisture and forest structure can help in better understanding how increasing aridity may affect the long-term persistence of forest cover near the prairie-forest ecotone in western Canada, potentially leading to the loss of ecosystem services provided by forests in this region. The successful candidate for this project will survey forest canopies using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and use the resulting imagery, together with aerial LiDAR and ground plot data, to quantify forest structure and biomass across a topographic gradient in soil moisture. He or she will then develop allometric models to assess how the size and form of individual trees, as well as the overall biomass and structure of forest stands, vary with water availability. Field work will be conducted in Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park, located near the southern end of the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. The position will be hosted at the Department of Biology working under the supervision of Dr. Mark Vanderwel. Applicants should have a BSc, a strong academic record in biology or a related field, and good quantitative skills. Candidates with a background in geography, math, or computer science with interests in ecology are also encouraged to apply. Preferred start date is May 2017, but this is flexible. To apply, please send a cover letter describing research interests, a CV, unofficial academic transcripts, and contact information for 2 references by e-mail to mark.vanderwel@uregina.ca. Posted: 3/2/17.

University of Rhode Island: PhD positions in plankton eco-evolutionary dynamics and global change biology. The Rynearson lab has two open positions for PhD students to focus on the broad themes of understanding ecology and evolution in marine phytoplankton. Both projects include aspects of global change biology. One position includes opportunities to examine phytoplankton gene flow, connectivity and diversity using population genetics and experimental evolution approaches. A second position includes opportunities to use genomics and transcriptomics to examine the metabolic ecology of phytoplankton. Applicants should have MSc and/or undergraduate degrees, with backgrounds in population genetics, physiology, ecology microbiology and/or evolutionary biology. Both positions include funding for tuition and salary. If interested, please send a short research interest statement and CV to Tatiana Rynearson with the subject line “Fall 2017 graduate position”. Initial queries should be sent by June 15 2017. Start date for the position is late August 2017. Posted: 5/23/17.

University of Rhode Island: M.Sc. or Ph.D. - Graduate Assistantship in Avian Ecology, Department of Natural Resources Science. A research assistantship is available at the M.Sc. or Ph.D. level to study the spatial ecology and habitat use of American Woodcock (AMWO) during migration and winter in the Delmarva Peninsula and elsewhere. Nanotags will be used to track the movements and habitat use of AMWO throughout winter and spring migration in relation to habitat availability. Body condition of birds will also be evaluated at capture by measuring plasma metabolites. Significant habitat assessment and mapping will also be involved. Most fieldwork will be conducted in the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia region in collaboration with the USFWS and the Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuges. Qualifications: Only hard-working, motivated, intelligent, good-natured persons interested in birds need apply. Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in animal/wildlife biology or ecology, earned at least a 3.2 GPA, must have taken the GRE, and must have excellent oral and written communication skills. Field experience with bird capture and handling, techniques for capturing AMWO, radiotelemetry, and GIS are highly desirable. Experience with quantitative analysis skills and field research is required. Ability to work collaboratively and to supervise research assistants and undergraduates working in the field is also required. Stipends are approx. $25k/academic yr (includes a mix of RA & TA) and tuition is paid. Summer stipend of approx.. $10k is also available. Starting date is September 2017. To apply submit the following to the URI Graduate School: a letter stating your qualifications and research interests, a resume or CV, official college transcripts, official GRE scores, and 3 letters of reference by no later than 15 January 2017 (early application is encouraged). Contact for further specific questions: Dr. Scott R. McWilliams, Dept. Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881; 401-874-7531; srmcwilliams@uri.edu. Graduate students will choose to be trained in the Ecology & Ecosystem Science or the Integrative & Evolutionary Biology graduate program. These are interdepartmental graduate groups within our College of the Environment and Life Sciences that are designed to provide students with a strong, interdisciplinary and integrative learning environment. Posted: 12/8/16.

University of Rhode Island: The Preisser Lab, as part of an NSF-funded collaboration with Colin Orians (Tufts University), is seeking two highly-motivated students for M.S. work in plant-insect ecology beginning in fall 2017. Full funding for two students will be provided as a combination of research and teaching assistantships, depending on student background and availability. Applicants should be independent, excited to work in a collaborative environment, and possess research, field, and/or modeling experience. Research in my lab addresses predator-prey and/or herbivore-plant interactions; specific research topics have included the population-level consequences of non-lethal interactions between predators and their prey and the effect(s) of interactions between invasive species on eastern forests. Prospective students should contact me at preisser@uri.edu; please provide a short description of your research interests and accomplishments, a CV (including GPA and GRE scores), and contact information for three references. I will contact suitable candidates to discuss potential graduate projects and to set up an interview. Formal department review of applications will begin January 1, 2017, but interested students should contact me well before the application deadline. Posted: 11/8/16.

University of Rhode Island: There are two open positions for PhD students at the Graduate School of Oceanography in the lab of Professor Rynearson to study ecology and evolution in marine phytoplankton. 1. Gene flow, connectivity and diversity in Southern Ocean diatoms: This PhD project will be associated with a collaborative project focused on examining links between diversity, gene flow and plasticity in Antarctic diatoms. The Southern Ocean is one of the most productive regions on the planet, yet very little is known about the population structure, gene flow, and functional diversity of the microbes that form the basis of this ecosystem. This is a fantastic opportunity for a graduate student to examine the evolutionary potential of key players in global biogeochemical cycles. Possible research questions include: What is the magnitude of gene flow between diatom populations across the Southern Ocean, and what functional implications does this have now and in the future? How does being cold adapted influence evolutionary and demographic responses to global change? 2. Metabolic ecology of marine diatoms: This PhD project is part of a collaborative effort to understand the metabolic responses of diatoms from different marine provinces, from the coast to the open ocean, using quantitative metabolic fingerprinting. Diatoms form the base of marine food webs in many regions and they have the capacity to thrive under a diverse set of environmental conditions. This project will use genomics and transcriptomics to tease apart the diverse metabolic responses of diatoms to their environment. Possible research questions include: How does nutrient availability influence diatom metabolic ecology? How are those pathways modulated across geochemical gradients? Applicants should have undergraduate and/or MSc degrees, with backgrounds in population genetics, physiology, ecology microbiology and/or evolutionary biology. Before applying, please send a short research interest statement and CV to Tatiana Rynearson with the subject line “PhD position”. Emails without this subject line will not be read. Initial queries should be sent by September 30, 2016. Start date for the position at URI as early as January 23, 2017. Posted: 8/23/16.

University of Saskatchewan: PhD candidate in soil phosphorus and carbon cycling in hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities. The remediation of complex mixtures by microorganisms involves a wide variety of bacteria, archaea and fungi. Yet, little is known about the different roles played by various members of these communities. As part of a project between industrial and university partners, the University of Saskatchewan, Department of Soil Science, is recruiting a PhD student in soil microbiology, to identify and characterize the role and function of select members of the soil microbial community during engineered biostimulation. The candidate will use the newly invented phosphate stable isotope probe coupled with conventional stable isotope probes to identify members and functions of communities across six different field sites. We hypothesize that there will be organisms directly responsible for hydrocarbon degradation, others involved in nutrient mobilization, and others providing unknown support services. Using a combination of expression and metabolomic approaches, the PhD candidate will unravel how these members respond to amendment gradients, to identify optimal biostimulation strategies in cold region soils. The successful candidates should have some experience in soil ecosystems, bioinformatics, ecological modelling, chemistry, and/or microbiology. The Department of Soil Science is Canada’s premier soil science department with 13 faculty, over 70 graduate students and a thriving undergraduate program in renewable resource management and environmental soil science. The PhD candidate in soil microbiology would join an applied research laboratory group headed by Steven Siciliano, an NSERC/COOP Industrial Research Chair in In Situ Remediation and Risk Assessment. The successful candidate should expect to spend substantial time interacting with industrial partners and working at field locations with environmental engineering teams. If interested, contact Steven.Siciliano@usask.ca with a resume, a statement of interest, and a transcript. Exceptional master’s candidates will also be considered. Also seeking other PhD candidates to investigate (1) the soil ecology of the hydrochar corona during remediation and restoration and (2) human bioaccessibility of groundwater pollutants. Posted: 5/1/17.

University of Saskatchewan: MSc in Avian Ecology and Ecotoxicology to pursue a project on the Influence of Climate Change on the Health of Breeding Shorebirds. The selected student will conduct research, using both captive and wild birds, to evaluate how changes in spring temperatures might influence the health of shorebirds, through effects on (a) embryonic development times, (b) tissue distributions and detoxification of contaminants in ovo, with consequences for physiological and fitness related trade-offs. Working at both the new U of S Facility for Applied Avian Research (FAAR) and in the field in collaboration with Dr. K Gurney at Environment and Climate Change Canada, the student will be trained in experimental design, sample collection, and statistical analyses of results. A strong background in biology, ecotoxicology or environmental science is required, and some prior field and/or captive research experience with birds is highly desirable. Minimum stipend funding is available at $18k per annum, however, candidates with a strong academic record (80% or higher) have a high probability of securing student scholarships. Ideally, the student will also have relevant experience in conducting field-based studies and be willing to develop their quantitative skills. To apply: Send application to Dr. Morrissey christy.morrissey@usask.ca and include (a) a letter describing your interests and qualifications for the position, specifically highlighting how your skills match the position requirements, (b) your CV/resume, (c) contact information for 3 academic/professional references, and (d) copies of any unofficial transcripts. Anticipated start date is January 2017, with field work commencing in early May. Applications should be received by Dec.1, 2016 but suitable candidates are encouraged to apply asap. Informal inquiries (without application materials) are welcome. Posted: 10/22/16.

University of Saskatchewan: MSc position in Ecotoxicology to study the Influence of fuelling and fasting on circulating contaminants and toxicity in migratory shorebirds. Duration: 2 years from start date: ideally January 2017 or May 2017 The student will address ecotoxicological questions related to shorebird fuelling at stopovers and fasting during long distance flights. Through a set of controlled experiments and possibly field sampling, we will evaluate the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of industrial contaminants (e.g. PCBs and PAHs) during both fuelling and fasting (flight) in birds. Position is based out of Saskatoon with captive bird work at the Facility for Applied Avian Research (FAAR). Some field work will be included depending on the student’s interest and skills. I am seeking an enthusiastic and motivated student with a solid academic background and a strong interest in ecology and toxicology. The ideal candidate will have experience working in avian wildlife with previous lab or field research experience. Specific requirements include 1) BSc degree in Ecology, Toxicology or Environmental studies with strong academic record (80% or better) 2) Experience in handling and blood sampling of birds is an asset 3) Experience in conducting lab bioassays or lab analyses is an asset 4) Strong writing and communication skills 5) Self-motivated and able to work independently and with a team. If interested and qualified, please send a statement of interest and suitability, your CV (including names of references), and a copy of your unofficial transcript by email to Dr. Morrissey christy.morrissey@usask.ca. Application deadline: Dec.1, 2016 or as soon as possible. Posted: 10/22/16.

University of Saskatchewan: PhD position: Importance of wetlands for offsetting adverse effects of agricultural intensification to birds. Deadline: Dec.1, 2016 or as soon as possible. Duration: 3-4 years from start date: ideally January or May 2017. We are seeking a talented student to develop a PhD program of research addressing questions about how intact Prairie wetlands can buffer agroecosystems against land use perturbations, pesticides and other stressors. The student will investigate factors that alter wetland health and the ability of wetlands to provide a resource for exporting high quality aquatic prey for terrestrial insectivorous birds. The work will involve observational and experimental studies using a well-established nestbox population of Tree swallows across different agricultural landscapes. This is a collaborative project with Dr. Tim Jardine (U of S) and Dr. Bob Clark at Environment and Climate Change Canada. We are seeking an enthusiastic and motivated student with a solid academic background and a strong interest in ecology of wild birds and aquatic ecosystems. The ideal candidate will have experience working on avian wildlife, aquatic invertebrates and with previous field research experience. Specific requirements include 1) BSc and MSc degree in Ecology and Environmental studies with strong academic record (80% or better) 2) Experience in handling and sampling of birds in order to obtain a banding permit 3) A valid driver’s licence 4) Strong writing and oral communication skills 5) an ability to work independently and with a team. If interested and qualified, please send a statement of interest and suitability, your CV (including names of references), and a copy of your unofficial transcript by email to Dr. Morrissey christy.morrissey@usask.ca. Posted: 10/22/16.

University of Saskatchewan: Root traits and root-soil interactions in contrasting crop genotypes Two positions (1 MSc, $21k for 2 years and 1 PhD, $24k for 3 years) are available in Melissa Arcand’s lab in the Department of Soil Science. This project is funded by the Global Institute for Food Security, NSERC Discovery, and the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. The primary objective of the research is to link plant root traits to soil processes and crop productivity. The students will investigate differences in (i) root system architecture, (ii) rhizodeposition, and (iii) how these factors relate to the development of the rhizosphere microbiomes and biogeochemical functioning of contrasting crop genotypes using techniques in root imaging, stable isotope labelling, and soil microbiology. The research will occur in controlled environments and in the field and in collaboration with plant physiologists, crop breeders, soil microbial ecologists, and soil chemists. Candidates with a BSc or MSc in Soil Science, Plant Science, Chemistry, Microbiology, Environmental Science or related discipline and with strong analytical laboratory and communication skills are encouraged to apply. Interested candidates should submit a CV, a one page statement of research interest, and unofficial transcripts to melissa.arcand@usask.ca. Start date: January 2017, or as early as September 2016. Posted: 8/15/16.

University of Saskatchewan: Anticipated Toxicology M.Sc. Opportunity: Environmental and social risk assessment to support informed collaborative decision making for vegetation management of northern Rights-of-Way. Through integration of social and environmental sciences, the goal of our research project is to develop both effective community engagement strategies and relevant ecological risk assessment data to support informed collaborative decision making for vegetation management of northern Rights-of-Way. SaskPower has extensive ROWs within the boreal forest ecosystem extending as far north as Uranium City and east to Flin Flon. As a first step in implementing an Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) plan for these northern ROWs, SaskPower is proposing the use of GarlonTM RTU via basal bark application to augment recent hand cutting. Information is needed regarding the persistence and toxicity of GarlonTM RTU in northern soils and plants. Local Indigenous communities have raised concerns regarding herbicide usage on northern powerline ROWs. In addition to working with SaskPower, this project will also work closely with Indigenous communities in northern Saskatchewan. Development of toxicology research questions will in part be driven by community concerns and sharing of information regarding risk associated with various vegetation management decisions will be an important aspect of the project. Incorporating toxicology research and community engagement provides an opportunity to build on our knowledge of northern boreal herbicide persistence and toxicity, while addressing the concerns of those communities most directly impacted by herbicide usage. The student will be expected to: - Complete two internships with SaskPower where they will provide relevant information for risk-based decision making and assist with development of an IVM monitoring system - Work closely with a northern Saskatchewan Indigenous community to integrate primary areas of concern regarding GarlonTMRTU usage into testable hypotheses - Complete field trials examining herbicide persistence and toxicity during the months of June-August in the northern Saskatchewan - Complete laboratory trials examining toxicity of GarlonTMRTU in northern boreal soils and plants - Work closely with a Project Manager and Masters of Environment and Sustainability (M.E.S.) student to facilitate community participation in field trials and assist with community outreach activities The expected starting date for this 2 year project will be September 1, 2016. The stipend for this position is $18k including benefits per year for 2 years. Interested candidates should submit a CV, three references and unofficial transcripts to Dr. Katherine Stewart (katherine.stewart@usask.ca). For more information please contact Dr. Stewart. Posted: 7/12/16.

University of Saskatchewan: Energetics of Life History Variation in a hibernating mammal (PhD): one Ph.D. student opening in the Lane lab in the Department of Biology. Ideally the student will begin September, 2016, but a January or April, 2017 start date may also be feasible. A full stipend ($20k CAD/yr for 4 years) is guaranteed, but the successful student will be expected to apply for any funding for which they may be eligible. The project will take advantage of recent approaches/technology (e.g., field respirometry, doubly-labeled water, body composition analysis) to test and advance life history theory. The study system is a fully-censused, long-monitored, population of Columbian ground squirrels (studied since 2003) in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. Requirements: GPA >80% (converted to the UofS’ 1-100 scale) over the past two years of schooling and a degree in a relevant discipline (i.e., Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Physiology, Environmental Biology). A passion for fieldwork is a must, as are strong scientific communication skills (both written and oral) and statistical proficiency (or a willingness to gain it). Evidence of scientific productivity (manuscripts published or in preparation, conference attendance and presentation) is also expected. This position is open to both Canadian and international students. Please submit a cv (including names and contact details of references), a short (1 pg) description of research interests and an unofficial copy of your transcripts to jeffrey.lane@usask.ca. To ensure full consideration of your application, therefore, please submit asap. Any questions can be directed to Jeff Lane. Posted: 6/22/16.

University of South Bohemia/Czech Academy of Sciences: Doctoral (PhD) Studentship in Ecology: Tropical Plant-Insect Food Webs, Department of Ecology and Conservation Biology. We are seeking highly motivated postgraduate students to join Vojtech Novotny’s international team studying the ecology of plant-insect food webs in tropical forest ecosystems, particularly Papua New Guinea, funded by an ERC grant. The successful applicant will have strong background in entomology, botany, community ecology, molecular ecology, phylogenetic analysis and/or biostatistics. We are looking for a creative person able to work in difficult field conditions, manage research teams, and analyse data on advanced level. Fluency in English is required, another language may be an advantage. Funding: Fully funded tuition, research costs and living expenses for 4-year PhD programme. Eligibility: A completed MSc degree is required. Applicants from all countries are eligible. Location: Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic (with field work in Papua New Guinea). Application: Send your CV, a cover letter stating qualifications, previous work and motivation, and contact details for three references to Prof. Vojtech Novotny (novotny@entu.cas.cz). Review of applications will begin on 20th March 2017 and will continue until the position has been filled. The studentship is available from 1st July 2017 (later start negotiable) and lasts four years. Pdf of this ad. Posted: 2/6/17.

University of South Bohemia/Czech Academy of Sciences: A four year PhD Studentship is available for a highly motivated postgraduate student to join a project exploring how abiotic and biotic factors structure host-parasitoid food webs. This collaborative project utilizes a novel food web model system of wild Drosophila species and their parasitoids. The student will take part in surveying the focal food webs along environmental gradients in tropical Australia and Papua New Guinea using modern DNA metabarcoding methods, establishing the role of symbiotic bacteria in food webs, and dissecting the factors structuring the food webs using field and laboratory experiments. There will also be opportunities to develop the project in a direction of the student’s own choosing. The successful applicant will join the Laboratory of Experimental Ecology at the Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre, Czech Academy of Sciences, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic, under the supervision of Dr Jan Hrcek. The laboratory is part of the Department of Ecology, a dynamic multinational centre for interaction network research with regular publications in leading journals. The student will be co-supervised by Prof. Owen Lewis (University of Oxford) and will be in regular contact with the Community Ecology group at Oxford. The deadline for applications is August 8th 2016, with expected start date of October 1st 2016. The student will receive a salary which comfortably covers living expenses in the Czech Republic. The salary will be composed of stipend from the University of South Bohemia and part time employment at Biology Centre CAS. The working language is English and applicants from all countries are eligible. Required · A master’s degree (non-negotiable requirement for PhD study in the Czech Republic) · A strong educational track record in biological sciences · Very good written and spoken English · Interest in community ecology · Experience with molecular laboratory work Desirable · Research experience with molecular ecology, insect ecology or laboratory experiments · Experience in ecological statistics or bioinformatics · Enthusiasm for fieldwork in the tropics To apply please send one document which includes CV, contact details for two references, and cover letter stating qualifications, previous work and motivation to Jan Hrcek [janhrcek@gmail.com]. Posted: 7/18/16.

University of South Dakota: Ph.D. Opportunity in Avian Biodiversity. The Missouri River Institute, Department of Biology, and Sustainability Program has a Ph.D. Research Assistantship position in ornithology available, beginning in August, 2017. The Ph.D. project is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation to examine impacts of movement toward a bioenergy economy for the Upper Missouri River Basin. The ornithology Ph.D. project will focus on modeling avian biodiversity and population projections in response to land-use and climate change. The project may also involve studying ecosystem services provided by birds or other avian ecology questions, but there is some flexibility in developing precise dissertation projects. The Ph.D. fellowship provides four years of support at an annual stipend of $22k, with teaching or research assistantship funding provided by the department for at least one additional year. Contact David Swanson (david.swanson@usd.edu) or Mark Dixon (mark.dixon@usd.edu), Department of Biology, for additional details. Posted: 11/16/16.

University of South Dakota: The Jarchow Lab at the University of South Dakota is seeking an innovative and hard-working student to be part of the first cohort of students in a graduate program in sustainability that is being developed at USD. The PhD position is fully funded for four years at ~$22k per year. The position has a flexible start date of either summer or fall 2017. The PhD position is part of a project, funded by NSF, titled “Sustainable socio-economic, ecological, and technological scenarios for achieving global climate stabilization through negative CO2 emission policies.” The project brings together an interdisciplinary team of researchers from USD, Montana State University, and the University of Wyoming to evaluate the role that a BEECS (bioenergy and carbon capture and sequestration) economy would have on the Upper Missouri River Basin (UMRB). The Jarchow Lab-led project has two main components. First, we will assess, map, and quantify how residents of the UMRB perceive the social values of the ecosystem services provided by their environment. Second, we will do sustainability visioning to develop a scenario of a desirable future for the UMRB. Applicants with training in a number of academic disciplines will be considered for this position including sustainability, biology/ecology, environmental science or studies, political science, sociology, or other related fields. Additional qualifications include knowledge of geographical information systems (GIS) software, excellent oral communication skills, and interest in conducting interdisciplinary research. To apply for this position, please send a cover letter describing your career goals and how your experience and qualifications make you a strong fit for this position to me (Meghann.Jarchow@usd.edu). Also attach your CV or resume, unofficial transcript(s), GRE scores (unofficial OK), TOEFL scores (for non-native English speakers only), and the names and e-mail addresses of three references. Applicants are encouraged to submit their materials by 16 December 2016. Posted: 11/14/16.

University of South Dakota: The Missouri River Institute, Department of Biology, and Sustainability Program have three Ph.D. research assistantship positions and a number of undergraduate summer research fellowships available, beginning in the summer and fall of 2017. The Ph.D. research fellowships will begin in August 2017 and are funded under a grant from the National Science Foundation to examine impacts of movement toward a bioenergy economy for the Upper Missouri River Basin. Ph.D. students will be part of a Graduate Program in Sustainability being developed at USD and will be housed in the Department of Biology. Ph.D. projects will be developed which relate to grant goals, with individual projects focused on impacts of land-use and climate change on water quality, bird & amphibian biodiversity, and cultural ecosystem services & sustainability visioning. Each fellowship provides four years of funding at an annual stipend of $22k, with teaching or research assistantship funding provided by the department for at least one additional year. Interested candidates may also contact project directors David Swanson (david.swanson@usd.edu) or Meghann Jarchow (meghann.jarchow@usd.edu). Posted: 10/12/16.

University of South Florida St. Petersburg: We are seeking Master of Science students with interest in ecology and historical ecology of freshwater ecosystems for research in our laboratory. Students would be enrolled in a thesis-based Master’s program in Conservation Biology. Our research examines biological and chemical evidence in lake sediment cores to reconstruct historical changes in lakes, watersheds, and wetlands. Findings have relevance to management, restoration, and conservation programs. Our research requires knowledge of modern freshwater ecology, and genuine interest in examining evidence in the historical context. We particularly seek students who have interest in aquatic and wetland plants, who would participate in historic analyses involving pollen, plant macrofossils, phytoliths, diatoms, algae, etc. The investigators have more than 30 years of experience in freshwater historical ecology. Florida has 8000 lakes that offer diverse research opportunities. Interested applicants should have a B.S. in a biological discipline, ecology coursework, and preferably some coursework in freshwater ecosystems and non-agricultural plants. Our program is small, selective, and M.S. students would be eligible for teaching assistantships that provide health insurance and some tuition waivers. The M.S. program application deadline is June 1, but those with interest in conducting thesis research in our lab should contact us well in advance to discuss their interests. We request serious inquiries only to: Dr. Thomas J. Whitmore - whitmore@usfsp.edu and Dr. Melanie Riedinger-Whitmore – mariedin@usfsp.edu. Posted: 5/1/17.

University of South Florida St. Petersburg: Applications are now being accepted for a new M.S. degree in Conservation Biology, that starts Fall 2017. This new thesis-based degree provides graduate training in conservation, biodiversity, organismal biology, taxonomy and ecology to students interested in pursuing careers in research and management of natural resources. The focus of our degree is on providing the academic and professional skills needed to study, protect and conserve biological and habitat diversity, with an emphasis on natural areas in southwest Florida. Admission to the M.S. program requires: a) a B.S. in Biological Sciences, or a related discipline from a regionally accredited college or university, b) a 3.0 GPA for the final 60 credit hours of the undergraduate degree, c) GRE test scores (General Test), and d) 3 letters of recommendation addressing the academic and research potential of applicant. Applicants that do not have an undergraduate Biology degree can still apply if they have completed at least 15 credit hours of upper-level undergraduate course work in biology relevant to a graduate degree in Conservation Biology (e.g. ecology, genetics, evolution, zoology, botany). Acceptance to the program also requires that a faculty member in the program has agreed to serve as a thesis advisor for the applicant. Graduation requirements include completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate-level core and approved elective course work, a minimum 3.0 graduate GPA, and the successful oral defense and publication-ready manuscript of the student’s thesis research. Students must complete all course work and thesis defense within 5 years of admission to the program. Please contact Dr. Melanie Riedinger-Whitmore, Chairperson, Department of Biological Sciences, mariedin@usfsp.edu for more information. Please refer to the Biological Sciences Faculty page for information on faculty research interests. Please apply by June 1st for consideration for graduate teaching assistant positions and tuition waivers. Both are highly competitive. Please see https://www.usfsp.edu/academics/masters-programs/ or contact the Office of Graduate Studies (727) 873-4567 or applygrad@usfsp.edu for more details on the application process. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Southern Mississippi: One M.S. position, funded by NAS Gulf Research Program, is available in the Division of Coastal Sciences, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, School of Ocean Science and Technology, The University of Southern Mississippi. The campus is located in Ocean Springs on Mississippi Gulf Coast, 1.5 hours away from New Orleans. The new graduate student is expected to start in Fall semester of 2017, and will conduct research on modeling the impact of sea-level rise on landscape and ecosystem services of coastal wetlands in the northern Gulf of Mexico region. Applicants should be highly motivated to learn new research skills, have a BS with quantitative background in ecology, statistics, mathematics, geography, or a closely related field. Experiences in modeling, Bayesian statistics, or GIS/Remote Sensing are desirable but not required. Assistantship with competitive stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance will be provided. Interested candidates should send an email describing their past experience and their motivation for pursuing a graduate degree, along with a resume, unofficial college transcripts, GRE scores, and the names and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Wei Wu wei.wu@usm.edu, Associate Professor, School of Ocean Science and Technology, The University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS 39564. Posted: 4/5/17.

University of Southern Mississippi: We seek a highly motivated student to fill a funded Ph.D. assistantship at USM's Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs. MS. The selected student will be co-advised by Dr. Kelly M. Darnell and Dr. M. Zachary Darnell. The overarching goal of this project is to conduct a management-driven, Gulf of Mexico-wide assessment of the use of turtlegrass as habitat by nekton and to evaluate the support provided to blue crabs, a commercially valuable species, using habitat-specific production estimates. This project will involve substantial field sampling and laboratory sample processing. Experience working in seagrass beds is preferred, but not required. This is a collaborative project with researchers at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, the University of Florida, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The student will work closely with personnel from these institutions. The student selected for this assistantship will pursue a Ph.D. in the Division of Coastal Sciences within the School of Ocean Science and Technology. This assistantship will begin in August 2017, and includes tuition and a stipend of $23k per year (increasing to $24k per year after achieving candidacy). The student selected for the assistantship will be a fully integrated member of the project team and will contribute to study design, collection and analysis of data, and manuscript preparation. Applicants with an M.S. degree are preferred. The Division of Coastal Sciences is a research and graduate education unit within the School of Ocean Science and Technology, offering programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees. The Division is located at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (Ocean Springs, MS), a marine laboratory featuring comprehensive basic and applied research programs in coastal and marine biological sciences. Research program support includes state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and instrumentation; a fleet of small and large research vessels, including the R/V Point Sur; the GCRL Museum collection; the Center for Fisheries Research and Development; NSF I/UCRC Science Center for Marine Fisheries, and aquaculture facilities including the Thad Cochran Marine Aquaculture Center. Interested students should contact Dr. Kelly Darnell (kelly.darnell@usm.edu). Please include a copy of your CV (including GRE scores), unofficial undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and contact information for three professional references. For full consideration, submit all materials prior to April 15. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Southern Mississippi: A funded Ph.D. Research Assistant position is available in the research laboratory of Dr. Kevin A. Kuehn, Department of Biological Sciences. This position is part of a 3 year funded NSF project that seeks to understand the relative importance of algal photosynthetic priming vs. photolysis in facilitating microbial-mediated (bacterial and fungal) organic matter decomposition in freshwater wetland ecosystems. The successful applicant is expected to have excellent communication skills, and will be creative, motivated and capable of working both independently and in a collaborative group setting. Applicants having experience in aquatic or microbial ecology would be considered a plus. A Master’s degree in biology, ecology, or closely related field is preferred; however, exceptional students with a B.S. degree will also be considered. Responsibilities of the Ph.D. student will include completing graduate coursework, research pursuant to the grant objectives, publishing their research findings, working with project collaborators, and participating in outreach related activities. The stipend for this graduate research assistantship is $20k/year and includes a full tuition waiver and health care benefits. The anticipated start date is negotiable. Interested applicants should send a cover letter, short statement of research interests and future goals, CV, contact information for three references, and copies of transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial is fine) to Dr. Kevin A. Kuehn (kevin.kuehn@usm.edu). Posted: 1/11/17.

University of Southern Mississippi: Location: USM Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Salary: $19k (minimum) stipend plus tuition. USM’s Division of Coastal Sciences is pleased to announce the availability of a MS or PhD research assistantship for a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation funded research project examining food webs and nutrient cycling at artificial reef sites in Mississippi waters. The prospective student should have an interest in fisheries oceanography, the use of stable isotopes in ecological studies and have analytical laboratory experience. This research is part of a larger project to assess Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus (and other major reef fish) populations in Mississippi state waters. The project has many components including fish age/growth, reproduction/histology, trophic ecology, and assessing water quality parameters. The student will participate in research cruises, prepare and analyze fish and prey item samples for stable isotope analysis and assist in the analysis of water samples for nutrients and other parameters. The Division of Coastal Sciences (COA) is a research and graduate education division of the School of Ocean Science and Technology, offering programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees. As a research-intensive unit, COA’s graduate program offers excellent opportunities for students to immerse themselves in applied as well as basic research. Graduates are equipped to help the nation better protect, manage, and enhance our marine resources. Investigator- and institutionally- initiated research programs support graduate and postdoctoral students in investigations related to aquaculture, aquatic toxicology, biodiversity, ecology, fisheries, and pathobiology. More information. To apply: Compile: 1. Cover letter 2. CV –include GPA and GRE scores 3. Unofficial transcripts. Please send requested information or any inquiries about the graduate assistantship to Dr. Kevin Dillon (kevin.dillon@usm.edu). Posted: 12/13/16.

University of Southern Mississippi: A MS position, funded by NAS Gulf Research Program, is available in the Division of Coastal Sciences, School of Ocean Science and Technology, (Gulf Coast Research Lab). The campus is located in Ocean Springs on Mississippi Gulf Coast, 1.5 hours away from New Orleans. The new graduate student is expected to start in spring semester of 2017, and will conduct research on developing multi-scale models for carbon dynamics in coastal wetlands and the impact of sea level rise on landscape of coastal wetlands in the northern Gulf of Mexico region. Applicants should have a BS in ecology, statistics, or a closely related field. Experiences in carbon research, Bayesian statistics, modeling, or GIS/Remote Sensing are desirable but not required. Interested candidates should send an email describing their past experience and their motivation for pursuing a graduate degree, along with a resume, unofficial college transcripts, GRE scores, and the names and contact information for 3 references to Dr. Wei Wu wei.wu@usm.edu, Associate Professor, School of Ocean Science and Technology, The University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS 39564. Posted: 9/28/16.

University of Southern Mississippi: One or more graduate positions in evolutionary ecology are available in the Schaefer lab to work on projects dealing with: hybridization and genomic patterns of introgression in the Fundulus notatus species complex, thermal ecology of a broadly distributed grazing minnow, and conservation biology and population genomics of a Mississippi endemic darter. All students admitted to the program receive a full tuition waiver, health insurance and support in the form of either a teaching or research assistantship. Information on the program and admission procedures. The preferred candidate will have a M.S. degree and experience working with stream fishes. Projects will offer professional development through a mix of field sampling, lab work, manipulative mesocosm experiments and collaboration with other universities. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Jake Schaefer (jake.schaefer@usm.edu), providing a brief review of research interests and experience. Posted: 9/26/16.

University of Southern Mississippi: I’m looking for 2 M.S. or Ph.D. students to join the Yee Lab of Aquatic Insect ecology to formally start Spring 2017. The student(s) should have interests in aspect of the ecology of insects in temporary waters, with an emphasis on mosquitoes, predaceous diving beetles, or both. Opportunities also exist for working with insects in terrestrial systems. The Yee lab uses a combination of field sampling, field and laboratory experiments, and statistical modeling to answer ecological questions and to test ecological theory. Research venues include the U.S. Gulf Coast as well as Puerto Rico. Strong candidates have a minimum GPA of 3.00 and have taken the GRE before application, experience with field work, publication record (including co-author), and have a good background in ecology and entomology. Prior experience in statistics is preferred but not essential. Students will < 3.00 GPA are unlikely to be considered. Deadline for applications is 15 October 2016. USM and the Yee lab are highly committed to diversity and access to research opportunities for underrepresented groups, including women. Thus, individuals from these groups are especially encouraged to apply. Full tuition scholarships for successful applicants are provided. Basic and major medical health coverage is provided to fulltime graduate students in good academic standing. Support is provided through a combination of teaching and research assistantships. If interested, submit (via e-mail) a brief (~ one page) review of your research experience, interests, and goals, a CV, and contact for two academic references to: Donald A. Yee, Ph.D. (donald.yee@usm.edu), Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Texas at Austin: The Farrior lab is soliciting applications for two open Ph.D. student positions. This new research group provides many exciting opportunities to creatively develop novel research directions. Research in the Farrior lab focuses on understanding how the fundamental constraints on plants interact with the environment to produce variation in plant functional traits within ecological communities and across landscapes. This understanding is critical as environmental conditions for many ecosystems are shifting into novel configurations. For this reason, we often collaborate with earth system modelers to understand the implications of findings for the global carbon cycle and the pace of climate change. Interested students should contact Dr. Caroline Farrior by email (cfarrior@austin.utexas.edu) with a CV (including GPA and GRE scores) and a short discussion of research interests. Formal applications will be submitted through the Ecology, Evolution and Behavior or Plant Biology graduate programs. Both programs provide excellent support and are the home to an impressive set of students. Applications are due December 1, 2016. Posted: 9/29/16, revised: 10/5/16.

University of Texas at El Paso: The McLaren Lab is looking for graduate students interested in working at the intersection of ecosystem and community ecology. A PhD position is available on an NSF-funded project examining the role of small mammals on carbon cycling in arctic tundra. This project will use a combination of field experiments with manipulations of mammal densities, measurements of plant and soil responses, and modeling and is a collaboration with faculty at Columbia University, Towson University, University of New Hampshire and the Marine Biological Laboratory. The project will involve summer field work in Alaska at Toolik Field Station, Barrow and Nome. The PhD student will assist with data collection for the larger project while developing his/her own dissertation project in conjunction with our research questions. The student will be support through a combination of RAships and TAships. Qualified candidates should have a B.S. or M.S. (preferred) in Ecology, Biology, Environmental Science or related field, and show a strong interest in plant ecology, ecosystem ecology or biogeochemistry. Ideal candidates will have some previous research experience in field ecology, a strong work ethic, be able to work independently and with a field crew, and availability to begin in June 2017. More information: Department of Biological Sciences and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program. Applications for graduate school are due Feb 1 but students are encouraged to contact me well in advance of that date. Interested students should send a c.v. and short statement of research interests to Jennie McLaren at jrmclaren@utep.edu prior to applying. Posted: 1/8/17.

University of Texas at El Paso: The newly established Lavretsky Population and Evolutionary Genetics Lab is seeking highly motivated doctoral student(s) to start in the fall of 2017 (but negotiable). The student will join a vibrant and growing research body in the Department of Biological Sciences, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program. The Lavretsky lab is recruiting students broadly interested in population genetics, evolutionary genetics, and/or conservation & wildlife genetics. My primary study system has been the mallard duck complex. The group is comprised of six island and eight mainland taxa that provide natural “replicates” for testing the roles and interactions of various evolutionary forces (i.e., selection, genetic drift, gene flow) in shaping genomes, as well as determining new methods to meet conservation goals. While there are several waterfowl based projects that I have currently moving forward, I am always open and encourage students to pursue other similar questions. Minimum Qualifications: - B.S. Degree in evolutionary biology, molecular biology, conservation genetics, bioinformatics or a related field - Highly self-motivated, independent, and creative thinkers that are enthusiastic about pursuing a career in population, conservation, and evolutionary genetics. Desired Qualifications: - Experience in population genetics, evolutionary genetics, or molecular evolution and with molecular data - Experience with programing language such as Perl or Python - Experience with analysis of NGS sequence data. To apply, please submit: a cover letter describing research interests, career goals, and experience related to, or interest in, a current CV; unofficial academic transcript; and, the name and full contact information for three references to Dr. Philip Lavretsky (plavretsky@utep.edu). Review of applications will begin January 1, 2017. Posted: 11/15/16.

University of Texas at El Paso: The Department of Biological Sciences, seeks a highly motivated doctoral student to study wetland ecology, which could include vertebrate, invertebrate or plant ecology at the genetic to ecosystem levels, beginning Summer 2017. Participation in undergraduate education activities, including design of laboratory exercises related to wetland ecology, is expected. Funding for this graduate research assistantship comes from a grant to UTEP from the Dept of Education through the Hispanic Serving Institutions STEM Articulation Program. Required qualifications include a Bachelor’s degree in biology or closely related discipline. To apply, please submit: a cover letter describing research interests, career goals, and experience related to, or interest in, curriculum development; a current CV; unofficial academic transcript; and, the name and full contact information for three references to Drs. Vanessa Lougheed (vlougheed@utep.edu) and Elizabeth Walsh (ewalsh@utep.edu). Review of applications will begin December 1, 2016. Posted: 11/8/16.

University of Texas Marine Science Institute: A graduate student position (MS or PhD) in the field of marine community ecology is available in the Yeager Lab to begin Fall 2017. Research in the Yeager lab focuses on understanding the factors regulating marine communities under environmental change to both advance process-based models in predictive ecology as well as inform effective conservation and management strategies. Specific areas of research include: habitat fragmentation effects on biodiversity, terrestrial-aquatic food web subsidies, coastal landscapes under global change, and macroecological controls on functional diversity. We combine field experiments, observational field surveys, and large-scale data synthesis to study the structure and function of a variety of coastal habitats including mangroves, seagrass, salt marsh, oyster reef, and coral reef habitats. The graduate student will work with Dr. Yeager to design their own research project within one of these focal research areas. Graduate students in the Marine Science program typically complete two semesters on the Austin campus before moving to the UT Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas for specialized advanced courses and thesis or dissertation research. Port Aransas is located on the Gulf coast near Corpus Christi. The Marine Science Institute provides opportunities to study living organisms in the laboratory and in their natural habitats. A wide variety of environments is readily accessible, such as the pass connecting Corpus Christi Bay with the Gulf of Mexico, the continental shelf, and many bays and estuaries, including brackish estuaries and the hypersaline Laguna Madre. Extensive wet laboratory facilities with running seawater are available for maintaining marine organisms. There are also specialized wet laboratories and environmental chambers for mariculture, physiology, behavior, and toxicology research. Vessels include the R/V KATY, a 54-foot ship with dredge and trawl equipment for collection of specimens and a fleet of smaller boats for use in bays and estuaries. There are 14 faculty in residence at the Marine Science Institute with wide ranging expertise including the fields of ecosystem ecology, fisheries ecology, microbiology, plankton ecology, biogeochemistry, estuarine ecology, physiology, and organic geochemistry. The ideal candidate for this position will have a BS or MS in a related field, previous field and laboratory research experience, the ability to work independently, and good quantitative and writing skills. To be considered, please contact Dr. Lauren Yeager by November 1st via email (lyeager@utexas.edu) with the following information: CV, GPA and GRE scores, brief statement of research experience, interests and career goals, and contact information for 2-3 references. Prospective students from under-represented minorities in marine science (African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, Hispanics, and Alaska/Native Americans) are encouraged to contact me. Posted: 9/26/16.

University of Tokyo: The Shefferson lab is recruiting graduate students at both the MS and PhD levels. We specialize in eco-evolutionary dynamics and plant/microbial evolution, and are currently working on the following funded research projects: 1) Micro-evolutionary interactions between symbiosis and population dynamics, with a focus on the mycorrhiza. 2) The micro- and macro-evolution of senescence-related life history patterns and life history costs, with a focus on herbaceous plants and terrestrial fungi. 3) Interactions between community structure and phylogeny at differing timescales, with a focus on the mycorrhiza. 4) Eco-evolutionary impacts of conservation problems and associated management. Students applying to work in the lab may focus on these topics, or choose other research themes in plant and microbial evolutionary ecology. Research methods typically involve in situ monitoring and experimentation, combined with modeling and analysis based in R and/or C++. The Shefferson lab is global in its scope, with active field sites in the USA, Europe, and Central America. Our current collaborations include projects in Estonia, China, Taiwan, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Although we work with all plants and fungi, we are particularly interested in herbaceous plants and mycorrhizal fungi. The Shefferson lab is located within the University of Tokyo, at the Komaba Campus. U Tokyo is home to some of the finest scientists in Japan, including ecologists and evolutionary biologists, and more Nobel laureates than you can shake a stick at. Komaba in particular has a particularly large community of ecologists and evolutionary biologists working on plants, animals, and fungi. We also offer graduate programs in both Japanese and English. Students wishing to pursue their graduate research may do so fully in English via the Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences. Please note the application deadline of 25 Nov 2016 for entry in September 2017. Entry into the program on this deadline typically includes a generous fellowship covering tuition and other expenses. If interested, please contact me at cdorm@g.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp, and please also explore the Shefferson lab website (linked above). Posted: 10/28/16.

University of Toronto: A fully-funded Ph.D. position is available either in the Geography Department or in the Faculty of Forestry. The Ph.D. candidate will develop new techniques for monitoring trees using the latest remote sensing technology. In particular, the candidate will use optical imagery and/or LIDAR to delineate tree crowns, then assess tree health, branch fall, and tree mortality. Some of the data will be collected using unmanned aerial vehicles or helicopters carrying hyperspectral sensors, multispectral sensors, as well as LIDAR. Thus, the candidate will have the opportunity to work at the Koffler Scientific Reserve and Haliburton Forest. Qualifications: 1) sincere interest in remote sensing and forest ecology; 2) strong quantitative skills; 3) remote sensing skills, or the ability to learn them quickly; and 4) excellent oral and written communication skills in English. Applicants should send a letter of enquiry and curriculum vitae to Prof. Yuhong He (yuhong.he@utoronto.ca) and Prof. John Caspersen (john.caspersen@utoronto.ca). Applications will be reviewed beginning January 15th. Posted: 10/11/16.

University of Tübingen: The Plant Ecology Group is searching for a PhD student in Plant Ecology. We are looking for an ecologist with excellent theoretical and practical knowledge in the field of plant ecology, with a focus on community ecology or population ecology. The candidate should hold a M.Sc., Diploma or similar degree in biology or a related subject. S/he should have a strong conceptual approach to ecological questions, a profound knowledge of biostatistics and experimental design, and basic knowledge of plant species. In addition, a good physical condition is advantageous, due to the extensive field work associated with the project. The project 'HEDGE 2' deals with the role of habitat heterogeneity for species diversity and is embedded the priority programme 'Biodiversity Exploratories' funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). This programme investigates relationship between land use and species diversity and includes three regions within Germany. In this particular project, we will collaborate with a modelling group in Israel (Prof. R. Kadmon), the core management team of the Exploratories as well as with remote sensing specialists with the aim of identifying how land use affects habitat heterogeneity and plant beta-diversity in the grasslands of the Biodiversity Exploratories. The work includes a large and innovative common garden experiment in Tübingen as well as extensive field studies in all three Exploratories. The main working place is Tübingen, a lively and pretty university town in South-West Germany. Our working group is very international and excellent knowledge of English is a prerequisite for this position. The salary is based on the German public tariff E13 TV-L (65%) and includes social benefits. The University seeks to raise the number of women in research and therefore urges qualified female academics to apply for this position. Disabled candidates will be given preference over other equally qualified applicants. Please send your application including a letter of interest and CV as a single pdf-file to Prof. Dr. Katja Tielbörger (vegetation@bot.uni-tuebingen.de) to whom also inquiries should be addressed. Please also make sure that two letters of reference will be sent to the above address independently. The deadline for applications is January 20, 2017. Posted: 12/23/16.

University of Utah: PhD Research Assistantships. Physiological Ecology of Western US Mountain Forests, Dept. of Biology. We are seeking PhD students to work with an interdisciplinary team studying forest physiology and forest carbon and water cycling in mountains of the western U.S. Current projects are focused on biological and physical factors influencing photosynthesis and transpiration of mountain forests in the context of climate change and drought. The students will have the opportunity to learn and use a wide variety of techniques, including measurement of leaf traits and gas exchange, plant water transport, forest environmental and flux measurement methods, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and to work collaboratively with scientists using satellite-based remote sensing observations and Earth system models. The students will be trained in analytical field and laboratory instrumentation and research techniques, experimental design, data analysis, computer programming, ecological modeling and scientific writing. These positions include up to 5 years of financial support in the form of research and teaching assistantships, and will involve field work in Utah, Colorado, and other western states. Requirements: 1) a bachelor’s or master’s degree and research experience in a field of Earth system science (ecology, geology, physics, chemistry, geography, etc.), 2) innate curiosity about the natural world and how it works, 3) interest in learning and applying cutting-edge analytical techniques to study ecology, and 4) strong motivation and ability to work both independently and collaboratively. Experience with plant physiological ecology or environmental instrumentation are highly desired. The students will be based in the research groups of Dr. Bill Anderegg and/or Dr. Dave Bowling. More information about our Graduate Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Deadline to apply is January 3, 2017. Opportunities to work on other projects are also available. If you’re interested, please contact either Dr. Bill Anderegg, anderegg@utah.edu Dr. Dave Bowling, david.bowling@utah.edu. Posted: 11/6/16.

University of Utah: We are seeking Ph.D. students interested in global change ecology to join the Anderegg Lab in the Department of Biology. We have ongoing projects on an array of topics, including drought-induced tree mortality, recovery after climate extremes, disturbance and carbon dynamics, and ecosystem modeling. Candidates with research interests in ecosystem ecology, disturbance, ecological modeling, ecophysiology, or plant ecology would be strong fits. Interested applicants should send a current CV including GPA and GRE scores and a brief statement describing your research interests and background to William Anderegg (anderegg@utah.edu). The Department of Biology at UU offers a competitive package for graduate students. Applications are due January 4, 2017. Posted: 9/7/16.

University of Vermont: A multi-year Graduate Research Assistantship position is available as part of a research study on Resilience to Extreme Events in Social Ecological Systems of the Lake Champlain Basin. We are seeking a student interested in pursuing PhD level research in the areas of catchment hydrology and stormwater management in the context of climate change impacts. Research will involve modeling (including programming) and field work components. Candidates should enjoy being part of an interdisciplinary team of researchers (i.e., faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and stakeholders) working toward identifying strategies that improve water quality resilience within the Basin. Additional information. Qualifications: B.A., B.S. with published research experience, or M.S. in engineering, environmental science, or a related field. Research interests and previous experience should fall within the following fields: hydrology, land use, stormwater management, catchment hydrology, water quality, soil science, programming, and mathematical modeling. A major goal of Vermont EPSCoR is workforce development, which means that the graduate students will be intensively mentored for success. PhD students should also expect to mentor undergraduate students during the summer research season. Individuals selected will be expected to interact substantially across the project. Start date January 2018 (may be flexible). For questions, please email: epscor@uvm.edu Applications should include a CV and cover letter, and be emailed to epscor@uvm.edu. For all inquiries and applications, please reference position number GRA#003. Note that the successful candidate selected by EPSCoR will also need to be admitted to the UVM Graduate College. Posted: 5/23/17.

University of Vermont: We are seeking a Ph.D. level Graduate Research Assistant to statistically downscale climate change projections and to use these projections to simulate forest dynamics in our New England study region. This position will require expertise, or the potential to develop expertise, in R/Python, Bayesian statistics and running simulation models in a Linux-based high performance computing environment. This position is part of a large interdisciplinary project at the University of Vermont that is supported by Vermont EPSCoR through a NSF Track 1 award, Basin Resilience to Extreme Events. This project is focused on understanding the linkages among the Lake Champlain Basin’s landscape, watershed and lake, and potential responses of this coupled natural and human system to climate change and extreme weather events. Some benefits to working on a large, interdisciplinary project like this include a community of faculty, GRAs and Postdocs working towards similar goals, dedicated administrative and technical support, and professional development activities This position requires an undergraduate or Master’s degree in a quantitative, computational or ecological field, coursework in statistics, and facility with a programming language. The position is available June 2017, has an annual stipend of $27k, health insurance, and a tuition scholarship. The grant guarantees full GRA support through May 31, 2021 and there is the potential for support beyond this date. The student will be primarily supervised by Prof. Brian Beckage, Ph.D., Department of Plant Biology, at the University of Vermont. Questions can be directed to Arne Bomblies (Arne.Bomblies@uvm.edu). To apply: please send CV, names and contact information for three references, and a cover letter outlining research interests, expertise and availability to epscor@uvm.edu and reference Position ID GRA#008. Posted: 3/7/17.

University of Vermont: We seek an enthusiastic and motivated student with expertise in biogeochemistry, soil science, catchment hydrology or related fields with a focus on exploring the biogeochemical linkages between terrestrial and aquatic systems during extreme climate events. The student’s dissertation research will utilize an advanced in-situ riparian soil and stream monitoring network to develop and address fundamental research questions regarding environmental controls on nutrient (P, N, Fe) and carbon efflux from landscape to streams in forested and agricultural catchments of the Lake Champlain Basin. Basic dissertation research questions will focus on the drivers of the response of soil and stream water quality to extreme events, such as antecedent conditions, phenology, and event severity, and how these manifest in systems that differ in riparian zone configuration (e.g., poor- vs. well-drained riparian soils) in forested and agricultural catchments. Qualifications: Previous experiences working with in-situ sensors in soils and/or streams are desirable, and enthusiasm and physical capability to conduct field intensive research across a range of weather conditions are required. MS research experiences studying nutrient/carbon dynamics in forested and/or agricultural riparian soils and/or catchments are also preferable. This position comes with a research assistantship that is renewable through May 2021. The position will begin on June 1, 2017, and applications will be considered until the position is filled. Please contact Carol Adair (Carol.Adair@uvm.edu) for more information. To apply: please send CV, names and contact information for three references, and a cover letter outlining research interests, expertise and availability to epscor@uvm.edu and reference Position ID GRA#001. More information. Posted: 10/14/16.

University of Vermont: Vermont EPSCoR is recruiting a prospective PhD level graduate student to join our cutting-edge NSF funded research on Basin Resilience to Extreme Events (BREE). We are initiating a five-year award of large-scale interdisciplinary studies which will determine how the Lake Champlain Basin’s landscape, watershed and lake conditions respond to extreme weather events and will test policy scenarios for enhancing resilience using our comprehensive Integrated Assessment Model (IAM). As a member of the BREE team, you will have excellent mentoring and participate in unique learning and professional development experiences including learning to communicate your science through our program with the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. CLIMATE STATISTICS PHD STUDENT, Position ID: GRA#008. Vermont EPSCoR’s latest Track 1 award, Basin Resilience to Extreme Events, is recruiting for a number of positions within the next year to work on a cutting-edge, large-scale, interdisciplinary, NSF-funded study which will determine how the Lake Champlain Basin’s landscape, watershed and lake conditions respond to extreme weather events. We are seeking a PhD level Graduate Research Assistant, who will be responsible for i) statistical modeling of climate change projections in support of downstream models and ii) using these climate change projections to simulate forest dynamics in our New England study region. This GRA will require or develop technical expertise in R/Python, Bayesian statistics and running simulations models in a Linux-based high performance computing environment. It is expected that the successful applicant will have an undergraduate or Master’s degree in a quantitative or computational field. Qualifications: An undergraduate or Master’s degree in a quantitative or computational field, coursework in statistics, and knowledge/facility with a programming language. This position comes with a research assistantship that is renewable through May 2021. The position will begin on June 1, 2017 (or as soon as possible thereafter). Questions can be directed to Arne Bomblies (Arne.Bomblies@uvm.edu). To apply: please send CV, names and contact information for three references, and a cover letter outlining research interests, expertise and availability to epscor@uvm.edu and reference Position ID GRA#008. See all of our job opportunities listed here: http://www.uvm.edu/EPSCoR/jobs. Posted: 7/7/16, revised: 3/27/17.

University of Washington: The Quantitative Ecology Lab is looking for a PhD student to take part in a large collaborative multi-predator, multi-prey study. The student will focus on camera trapping and non-invasive sampling to examine patterns of predator-prey dynamics in Northeastern Washington, where wolves are recolonizing. The student will be advised by Beth Gardner in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington and will work closely with biologists in the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and other faculty in SEFS. The position is fully funded for 4 years (stipend, tuition, research costs). The start date is somewhat flexible, between spring and fall of 2017. An MS degree, excellent quantitative skills (including knowledge of R), strong academic record, and previous experience with hands-on wildlife research (preferably, camera-trapping) is required. A record of publishing in peer-reviewed journals and knowledge of occupancy or capture-recapture modeling is highly desirable. To be considered for this opportunity, send a cover letter outlining your research interests and qualifications, a CV, and contact information for 3 references to Beth Gardner (bg43@uw.edu) by January 6, 2017 (open until position is filled). Please include your undergraduate GPA and GRE scores (percentiles) in your materials. Posted: 12/12/16.

University of Washington: The lab of Dr. Brian Harvey in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences is seeking qualified, motivated, and enthusiastic applicants for graduate research (PhD, MS) in disturbance ecology and landscape ecology of forest ecosystems. Our research focuses on conifer forests in western North America (Rocky Mountains and Pacific Northwest), and centers on advancing ecological theory and connecting scientific understanding to effective forest management. Projects are primarily field based, and we link field data with remote sensing, GIS, and spatial analyses to gain insights across scales. We are particularly interested in how forest disturbances (e.g., wildfires, insect outbreaks) and climate change affect forest resilience and the maintenance/provisioning of forest ecosystem services. Exact research topics for students are flexible within these broader themes. Students interested in applying to start in Fall 2017 (possibly beginning fieldwork in Summer 2017) are encouraged to contact Brian Harvey (brianjamesharvey@gmail.com). Please send a brief introductory email (with a pdf of your CV/resume) to start the discussion of potential research directions and other considerations. We should speak by phone before formally applying to the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (Dec. 1, 2016 application deadline). Accepted students can expect to be funded (stipend, tuition, and benefits) on a combination of research assistantships (RA), teaching assistantships (TA), and competitive fellowships/grants to be written in collaboration with Dr. Harvey. The School offers access to a wide range of field sites in the Pacific Northwest and provides an excellent foundation to launch a successful career in forest ecology. Students also have opportunities to collaborate with a broad network of researchers in other departments across campus, the US Forest Service, the National Park Service, and the Washington Department of Natural Resources. Posted: 9/14/16.

University of Washington Seattle: Two PhD students are needed to take part in an exciting new study examining interactions among carnivores and ungulates in northern Washington. Two funded positions are available to examine: (1) effects of recolonizing wolves and resident cougars on ungulates (mule deer, white-tailed deer, and elk), and (2) interactions among large and small carnivores (with a focus on wolves, cougars, coyotes, and bobcats). This is a large collaborative multi-predator, multi-prey study beginning in 2017 with funding from NSF and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The students will be advised by Laura Prugh in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington, and they will work closely with other PhD students, professors (Aaron Wirsing and Beth Gardner), and WDFW biologists. Both PhD positions will involve intensive fieldwork and have considerable flexibility in terms of specific questions that will be addressed. The ungulate-focused position will likely involve assisting with adult GPS collaring operations, leading neonatal captures, assessing habitat conditions, modeling spatial movements, and/or modeling predator-prey interactions. It would be ideal for the student to conduct pilot fieldwork starting in May 2017. The mesocarnivore-focused position will likely involve coyote and bobcat GPS collaring, scat analysis (fecal genotyping and diet), stable isotope analysis, small mammal trapping, monitoring scavenging at ungulate carcasses, and a variety of modeling approaches (e.g., spatial CMR, movement, behavior, demography). This position will start fall 2017. An MS degree, strong academic record, and previous experience with hands-on wildlife research (ideally, with ungulates or carnivores) is required. Strong quantitative skills and a record of publishing in peer-reviewed journals are highly desirable. In exceptional cases, applicants without MS degrees may be considered (e.g., if the applicant has a first-author peer-reviewed publication, excellent academic record, and field experience). To be considered for these opportunities, please send a cover letter outlining your research interests and qualifications, a CV, and contact information for 3 references as a single PDF document to Laura Prugh (lprugh@uw.edu). To ensure full consideration, submit your materials by December 31, 2016. Be sure to include your undergraduate GPA and GRE percentiles (NOT raw scores) in your materials. Posted: 12/19/16.

University of Western Australia: The Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology research group (ERIE) is seeking applications from highly qualified and motivated candidates for a PhD program investigating the restoration of habitats through the reintroduction of native digging mammals. The successful student will work as part of a team within the ERIE group, and in conjunction with government and non-government conservation agencies. Mammals that dig for food or create burrows have the ability to alter their environment. The digging actions of some mammals have been linked with altered soil properties, microhabitat resources and seedling recruitment, with many digging mammals being considered ecosystem engineers. In Australia, the majority of digging mammals have suffered widespread declines and the loss of digging mammals has been linked with deterioration in ecosystem function of landscapes. Where digging mammals have been reintroduced into predator-proof sanctuaries, their foraging or burrowing activities are associated with the restoration of ecosystem processes. The main aims of this project are to i) further investigate the ecosystem engineering capabilities of Western Australia’s threatened digging mammals; and, ii) to examine whether the reintroduction of previously abundant digging mammals can assist in the restoration of landscape processes. The student will be supervised by IAS Distinguished Fellow Professor Richard Hobbs and Dr Leonie Valentine at The University of Western Australia; and be part of the National Environmental Science Programme's Threatened Species Recovery Hub (NESP – TSR). Funding This project is funded with a UWA PhD Scholarship (AUD$26k p.a.) and a NESP – TSR top-up scholarship ($7k p.a.) tax free in fortnightly instalments for 3 years. UWA provides funding for research activities ($2,500 p.a.) and students are encouraged to seek additional research funds by applying for student grants. Eligibility The successful candidate will have a background in ecology and conservation biology or environmental science and will be capable of collecting high-quality field data. We are looking for a candidate who is enthusiastic and driven, wants to work as part of a collaborative, interdisciplinary team, but with the ability to work independently when required. Excellent academic results and existing publications are desirable, but not essential. The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship: The scholarship is open to Australian and International candidates. Applicants must hold a Bachelors degree with honours or a research Masters degree or be able to demonstrate relevant and substantial research experience in a comparable field. Applicants must be able to demonstrate knowledge of field research, including the ability to independently plan and execute field-based research. Demonstrated high level communication skills (written and oral) and analytical skills are desirable. How to apply Interested individuals are invited to discuss the project with Dr Leonie Valentine (Leonie.Valentine@uwa.edu.au) and Prof. Richard Hobbs (Richard.Hobbs@uwa.edu.au) in the first instance, before the UWA closing date. Applicants are asked to submit a CV, academic transcript and a short letter outlining their suitability for the project. The candidate will be expected to commence the doctoral program in mid-late 2017 (negotiable). UWA Closing date: 31st May 2017. Posted: 3/27/17.

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Recruiting: Ph.D. student. Project: Systems biology enabled research on the roles of microbial communities in carbon cycle processes – Determination of the roles of pyrophilous microbes in the breakdown and stabilization of pyrolyzed forms of soil organic matter Institution: University of Wisconsin-Madison (Dr. Thea Whitman) Collaborators: University of California-Berkeley (Dr. Matthew Traxler and Dr. Tom Bruns), and Joint Genome Institute (Dr. Igor Grigoriev). We are recruiting a Ph.D. student to work on a DOE-funded multi-institutional project investigating the role of microbes in post-fire soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics. The ideal candidate will have an MS, with expertise and interest in some or all of the following areas: microbiology and soil science, stable isotope probing of DNA, bioinformatics, microbial community ecology, soil carbon cycling or pyrogenic organic matter cycling, and gas flux tracing using stable isotopes. Successful candidates will join a dynamic team of researchers to use a systems biology approach, coupling 13C stable isotope probing of nucleic acids, gas flux analyses, small experimental “pyrocosms”, and mass spectrometry to dissect the effects of microbes on post-fire SOM dynamics. The position could start during the summer or fall semesters of 2017. If you are interested in this project, please contact twhitman@wisc.edu, sending a statement of interest and your cv before April 15, 2017. Posted: 4/3/17.

University of Wisconsin - Madison: A 4-year PhD research assistantship is available to study the ecology of one of Wisconsin’s endangered species – American marten. The student will combine field work on the Apostle Islands in Lake Superior with genetic approaches in the laboratory and demographic/population modelling to explore the distribution, origin and viability of this cryptic population of American martens. This assistantship will include 2-3 months of fieldwork on the remote islands. The student will be advised by Forest & Wildlife Ecology professor Jonathan Pauli and in collaboration with researchers at the National Park Service, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, US Forest Service and Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. Note that additional field, laboratory or modeling components could be added depending on shared interests and funding opportunities. Funding for a 12-month research assistantship and tuition remission is available for four years, pending satisfactory progress. Prospective students should have: Solid working knowledge/experience in field ecology, laboratory approaches (preferably genetic-based approaches) and population or community modeling; A master’s degree in ecology, biology, conservation or related environmental sciences (BS considered with equivalent demonstrated experience/expertise) and; Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills, as well as the ability to work and lead a research team. Current annual stipend levels are $22k per year before taxes, plus tuition remission and health care benefits. A start date of approximately 1 September 2017 is envisioned. Applications received before March 1, 2016 will be given full consideration. The application will ask for demographic information, test scores, previous and current education, previous and current research experience, and contact information for three references. Candidates will also need to upload (each as a PDF): 1) a letter outlining research interests, goals, and academic and professional background; 2) a resume or CV and; 3) unofficial transcripts (all institutions combined into a single PDF). Questions regarding application materials should be directed to our Student Services Coordinator, Sara Rodock (rodock@wisc.edu). Questions about the position (but not your application) should be directed to Dr. Pauli (jnpauli@wisc.edu). Posted: 1/16/17.

University of Würzburg: the M.Sc. program on applied Earth Observation and Geoanalysis of the Living Environment (EAGLE) offers a wide range of courses aiming to improve the application of remote sensing in various disciplines such as ecology, conservation, agriculture, forestry or water management. EAGLE is an international English language M.Sc. program offered at the University of Würzburg, Germany. It is focusing on Applied Earth Observation and Geoanalysis for the environment. The goal of EAGLE is to strengthen the practical use of applied Earth Observation in research, planning, and decision making, and to unlock the full potential of remote sensing data analyses in your desired field of application. The application deadline is May 15. Posted: 4/3/17.

University of Wuerzburg: 2 PhD student positions in Microbiome Ecology (Start March 2017 for 3 years), Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology. Within a collaborative framework between Würzburg (S. Leonhardt, A. Keller), Salzburg (R.R. Junker) and München (M. Schloter), the bacterial associates of flowers and bees will be investigated, with focus on the influence of land-use intensity on natural microbiota. Both positions will work in close interaction with each other in Würzburg, conducting field work, NGS-based microbiome assessments, bacterial cultivation, bioassays, chemical analyses and genomics. Position 1 — Floral Microbiota: Although flowers are directly linked to plant fitness and reproduction, bacterial colonizers of the anthosphere are less well characterized and understood compared to such associated with leaves or roots. We will investigate the organismal, functional, and genetic diversity of floral microbiota as a function of land use, plant diversity, and functional flower traits to understand links between these levels of diversity. Position 2 — Bee Microbiota: When investigating land-use effects on pollinators, a major player has been mainly ignored: microbes. Pollen, nectar and nesting materials are strongly affected by land-use, but also determine the microbiota of solitary bee adults, larvae and nests with direct consequences for host health. Goal of this study is to identify effects of land-use, landscape and foraging on microbial associates and functions in bees, on stability of the mutualism and also disease vectorization. Please send your application via eMail to Dr. Alexander Keller (a.keller@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de) as a single PDF document until 15th January 2017. Applications should include a cover letter, a short summary of research interests, CV, certificates, and contacts of two potential referees. Please also indicate your preference for one of the two projects. Both position are pending final funding decision. Primary requirement is strong interest and motivation in conducting biodiversity research on a metagenomic, molecular level. Further, applicants must have a MSc/ Diplom (DE) related to one of: - Metagenomics - Community ecology - Pollination ecology - Chemical ecology - NextGen-Sequencing - DNA-Barcoding - Bioinformatics - Microbial biochemistry - Microbial cultivation The successful candidates must be willing to become acquainted with these topics during the projects, as well as scientific writing in english. Posted: 12/8/16.

University of Wyoming: A funded Ph.D. Graduate Assistant position starting in the fall 2017 semester is available in the research laboratory of Dr. Daniel Laughlin in the Botany Department. This project will evaluate how plant traits moderate species responses to changing climate in western US ecosystems. The successful applicant will demonstrate experience and interests in plant population and community ecology, functional ecology, and quantitative modelling. Interested applicants should email a statement of interest, CV, contact information for three references, and copies of transcripts and GRE scores (unofficial is okay) to daniel.laughlin@waikato.ac.nz. Posted: 1/16/17.

University of Wyoming: PhD Under-Represented Domestic Minority (URDM) mentoring Graduate Assistantship available to work with Dr. Melanie Murphy in Department of Ecosystem Science and Management/Program in Ecology. Graduate student research will address distribution and connectivity of amphibian species in the context of species rarity. Q1 – Is niche breadth explained by rarity? Student will use environmental DNA (eDNA) and species distribution models to estimate niche breath. Q2 - What are the consequences of species’ rarity on connectivity? Student will use genotyping by sequencing (GBS) and a landscape genomics approach to test competing hypotheses of limits to effective dispersal for species by rarity form. Prospective students with a background in natural resources, ecology, and/or population genetics are encouraged to apply. Evidence of robust analytical skills, ability to work independently under harsh field conditions, strong work ethic, scientific writing, passion for scientific inquiry, and aptitude for collaborative research are expected. Additional skills in population genetics laboratory skills, particularly using low quality/low quantity DNA, will be preferred but not required. Work will require hiking, backpacking, camping, working in harsh field conditions at high elevation and driving a 4WD vehicle. To apply, please send a statement of interest, complete CV, unofficial transcripts, unofficial GRE scores, and contact information for three professional references as a single PDF file (LastName_URDM.pdf) to melanie.murphy@uwyo.edu. Application deadline is Jan 13, 2017 [extended]. Position starts August 2017. Candidate(s) may be invited to attend a recruiting event in mid to late February (financial support available for travel expenses). In addition, applicants are encouraged to investigate the Program in Ecology, an integrated, interdepartmental PhD program in ecological science. Posted: 12/13/16, revised: 1/7/17.

University of Wyoming: The Plant Sciences department is recruiting a PhD student to conduct research exploring the ecology of plant-insect interactions in cropping systems. The project will focus on plant defenses against the alfalfa weevil and will include both greenhouse and field components. The student will serve as a teaching assistant for both face-to-face classes as well as distance-based online education in the department. This assistantship specifically supports under-represented domestic minority students, specifically American-born or naturalized citizens of African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American-Indian/Alaskan native, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, or Asian descent. The student will be mentored in the areas of research, teaching, public outreach, and career development. More broadly, support and community are present at the University through Multicultural Affairs, including the Multicultural Resource Center and a suite of student organizations, and the Women in Math, Science & Engineering (WiMSE) program. In addition to the department’s PhD degree in Agronomy, the University of Wyoming also offers an interdisciplinary PhD program in Ecology. Required qualifications are a BS in biology, ecology, entomology, and agronomy, or a related field, independent research experience, demonstrated excellence in oral and written communication, and a valid driver’s license, given necessary research travel throughout the state. Preferred qualifications are a MS degree in the fields listed above, and experience and interest in working with plants, insects, and agriculture. Interested applicants should contact Dr. Randa Jabbour with any questions or for information on how to apply (rjabbour@uwyo.edu, 307-766-3439). Application review will begin January 15, 2017. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Preferred start date is May 2017. Posted: 11/8/16.

University of Wyoming: We are seeking a PhD student to develop dissertation research in collaboration with an NSF-funded project to understand how elephant browsing is compounding the negative effects of an invasive ant on trees in Laikipia, Kenya. In this region, native mutualist ants defend the dominant tree Acacia drepanolobium from browsing by elephants. The invasive big-headed ant is disrupting this mutualism by killing native ant species, leaving the trees undefended against the destructive effects of elephants -- which can destroy whole trees -- and other wild browsers. Invasive ants may also be having negative impacts on trees, independent of browsing. We are interested in the consequences of invasive ant-elephant interactions for savanna dynamics, particularly as they relate to tree cover and demography, and habitat use by wild and domestic ungulates. Desired qualifications of the PhD student: (1) research experience (preferably an MSc) in ecology, wildlife biology, or a similar field; (2) demonstrated abilities in writing, oral communication, and statistical skills; (3) demonstrated ability in GIS and/or remote-sensing skills, or a strong desire to learn; (4) demonstrated ability in demographic modeling, or a strong desire to learn; (5) intellectual creativity and self-motivation to conceive, design, and implement dissertation work largely independently and in remote field conditions; and (6) demonstrated ability in communicating with rural landowners and other stakeholders. The PhD student will be co-advised by Drs. Jake Goheen and Corinna Riginos at the University of Wyoming. Field research will entail 4-8 months per year for four years at the Mpala Conservancy and Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia, Kenya. To apply, please send a single pdf attachment (file name formatted as lastname_firstname_phd_date.pdf) to jgoheen@uwyo.edu containing (1) a cover letter/statement of interest; (2) a CV; (3) copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts; (4) copies of GRE scores; and (5) contact information for three references. Please use the subject header “PhD assistantship application”. Review of applications will begin 20 August 2016. We expect the student will commence graduate studies in Spring 2017. Posted: 7/29/16.

Utah State University: We are looking for a motivated MS student to study the phenology of a native and commercially managed solitary bee species, the blue orchard bee, in managed and unmanaged settings. The student will be advised by Dr. Theresa L. Pitts-Singer in the USDA-ARS Pollinating Insects Research Unit in Logan, UT. Specific research objectives of the position: 1. Determine the variation in developmental phenology of regional populations of blue orchard bees (BOBs) by maintaining regionally-specific bees under managed or unmanaged conditions. 2018 January-December; 2019 January-June. 2. Determine the heritability of regional phenology traits for BOBs from California and Utah by examining population crosses in controlled experiments. 2018 January-December; 2019 January-June. 3. Determine the difference in the retention of females between California and Utah BOBs used as pollinators in regions outside of their geographic origin by examining the dispersal and flight range of these populations in cherry orchards in regionally distinct environments. 2018 March-November. Requirements: Acceptance to USU graduate program; Bachelor’s Degree in life sciences (e.g., biology, ecology, entomology, natural resources, botany) from accredited university; experience with bees and/or pollination desired. USU Biology Department. Send inquiries to Dr. Theresa Pitts-Singer, Theresa.Pitts-Singer@ars.usda.gov; 435-797-0581. Posted: 5/9/17.

Utah State University: The Environmental Biogeochemistry and Paleoecology lab is recruiting MSc students to join an interdisciplinary research program broadly focused on aquatic ecosystems and water resources in the American West. The student(s) will work on projects that seek to quantify and characterize dust deposition effects in Utah lakes. Specific research projects are flexible and students are strongly encouraged to develop their own research focus within the lab’s overall framework. Students in the lab will generally have the opportunity to gain field, laboratory, and microscopy skills. Qualifications: The student(s) must have completed a BSc by the start data and have a strong interest in water quality, limnology, biogeochemistry, or aquatic ecology. The student must have excellent writing and quantitative skills. Laboratory and field experience is preferred. Preference will be given to students with a strong work ethic and capacity to work independently. How to Apply: Please send 1) letter describing your background, interest in the project, and educational and career goals, 2) a CV, and 3) the names and contact information for three references to Janice.brahney@usu.edu. Anticipated start date is no later than August 2017, but students may begin as early as June 2017. Posted: 4/3/17.

Utah State University: The Atwood and Kettenring labs in the Department of Watershed Sciences and the Ecology Center have openings for graduate students (MS and/or PhD) in wetland ecosystem services and wetland plant restoration, starting summer and fall 2017. One project is primarily focused on quantifying ecosystem services in natural and restored Great Salt Lake wetlands and the prioritization of management actions based on different ecosystem service scenarios, under the guidance of Dr. Trisha Atwood, an aquatic ecologist with a focus on global change. Students with past experience working in wetlands and/or working with conservation prioritization tools are particularly encouraged to apply. A second project is focused on techniques for reestablishing native plants for supporting ecosystem functions and services in Great Salt Lake wetlands, under the guidance of Dr. Karin Kettenring, a plant ecologist who focuses wetland restoration and management. Students with a background and interest in seed ecology, plant propagation, and/or wetland restoration are particularly encouraged to apply. Interested candidates should email Dr. Atwood (trisha.atwood@usu.edu) and Dr. Kettenring (karin.kettenring@usu.edu) with their transcripts (unofficial okay), GRE scores, a statement of research interests including preference for one or both projects, and a resume or CV. Review of applicants will begin April 14, 2017. Posted: 4/3/17.

Utah State University: PhD Assistantship – Large animal food web ecology. The successful applicant will focus on understanding how interactions between wolves, elk, and aspen in northern Yellowstone National Park are shaped by other members of the large animal community including bears, cougars, and bison. Research will be conducted in collaboration with agency scientists and will involve integrated analyses of several long-term datasets. Desired start date: August 28, 2017. The assistantship includes tuition and fees, health insurance, travel stipend, and a yearly stipend of $20k for up to four years. Funding is contingent on receipt of a S. J. and Jesse E. Quinney Doctoral Research Fellowship awarded to the student by the Wildland Resources Department. Deadline for fellowship applications is February 17, 2017. Minimum qualifications: MSc in ecology, wildlife biology, conservation biology, or related field; GRE scores (for both verbal and quantitative) ≥70th percentile and cumulative GPA ≥3.50. Competitive applicants will have experience collecting, analyzing, presenting, and publishing field data, working collaboratively with agency and academic scientists, and strong interests in developing and applying quantitative models of food web dynamics. Applicants should email the following materials as a single pdf file with the subject line “PhD Assistantship” to dan.macnulty@usu.edu: (a) one page cover letter describing relevant experience, interests, and professional goals, (b) CV, (c) GRE scores, (d) transcripts (unofficial) from undergraduate and graduate education, and (e) contact information for three professional references. Consideration of interested applicants begins immediately and continues until February 10, 2017. For additional information contact Dr. Dan MacNulty. Posted: 1/26/17.

Utah State University: Doctoral Fellows – Two four-year fellowships, including stipend, tuition, and fees, are available for PhD students in any discipline within Watershed Sciences. Colorado River Scholarships – Two four-year scholarships, including stipend, tuition and fees, and research support, are available for PhD students whose focus is the application of science to the management of the Colorado River. Climate Adaptation Science – For students admitted to the graduate program, one-year fellowships are available to support participation in the Climate Adaptation Science program, a traineeship that combines interdisciplinary research, work-place experience, instruction, and collaboration among scientists, land and resource managers, policy-makers, trainees, and citizen stakeholders. Where to start: contact a faculty member with whom you would like to study. Graduate admissions in the Department of Watershed Sciences requires faculty sponsorship and funding. Watershed Sciences is a multidisciplinary department in the Quinney College of Natural Resources. Our faculty conduct research in geomorphology, hydrology, aquatic ecology, limnology, fish ecology, wetland ecology, water quality, biogeochemistry, and paleoecology. We find collaborative opportunities in addressing problems of management and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Posted: 12/19/16.

Utah State University: I am recruiting a student for a project on techniques for restoration of native plant species in alkali semi-desert areas, where restoration research historically has focused largely on non-native species. The student will perform soil and vegetation mapping, followed by implementation of experiments testing establishment of native plants in different types of vegetation patches and under different site preparation treatments. This project is best suited for students with genuine interest in generating practical restoration approaches for land management agencies. The student will have the freedom to further develop and test broader restoration concepts including, but not limited to: 1) efficacy of high-effort restoration approaches (e.g., plantings vs. broadcast seeding), and 2) establishment of ‘restoration islands’ or ‘nucleation plantings’. A PhD student will have the most freedom to pursue these concepts (or others), given the time constraints of an MS degree. The project will be conducted in collaboration with Dr. Janis Boettinger (USU), Dr. Tom Monaco (USDA-ARS), and the Pocatello Bureau BLM. Desired qualifications include past independent field research experience, excellent written communication skills, and experience working with both soils and vegetation. MS and PhD candidates must apply to USU’s School of Graduate Studies and may be interested in applying to the interdisciplinary Climate Adaptation science program. PhD students are required to apply for the USU Presidential Doctoral Research Fellowship and S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney Ph.D. Fellowships Program (announcement forthcoming). Before beginning the formal USU application process potential students should send 1) a letter of interest and qualifications, 2) CV, 3) unofficial transcripts, 4) GRE scores, and 5) contact information for three references to Dr. Kari E. Veblen (kari.veblen@usu.edu). Review of applications begins immediately. Start date: summer or fall 2017. Closing date: 12/31/16. Posted: 11/8/16.

Utah State University: Biology seeks a highly motivated student to study ecology and behavior of a highly invasive insect pest, brown marmorated stink bug, in Utah’s urban-agricultural landscapes, beginning August 2017. Specifically, the project will focus on determining the phenology (timing and development) of brown marmorated stink bug life stages (eggs, nymphs, and adults), and comparing efficacy of traps and pheromone lures for adults in fruit and adjacent crops. Participation in public outreach activities is expected. The graduate research assistantship includes an annual stipend, tuition waiver, and student health insurance. Required qualifications include a Bachelor’s degree in biology, entomology, ecology, horticulture, or closely related discipline. To apply, please submit a 1-page cover letter describing research interests and career goals, a current CV, unofficial academic transcript and GRE test scores, and the name and full contact information for three references to Drs. Diane Alston (diane.alston@usu.edu) and Lori Spears (lori.spears@usu.edu). Review of applications will begin December 1, 2016. Posted: 11/6/16.

Utah State University: Biology seeks a highly qualified and motivated individual wishing to pursue an MS or PhD degree beginning fall 2017. The successful applicant will evaluate how agricultural and urban landscape structure affects beneficial insects (pollinators and predators) and their interactions with abiotic (e.g., drought) and biotic (e.g., entomopathogens) factors. As a component of this project, the student will also be heavily involved with developing interactive identification and diagnostic tools that include fact sheets for current and potentially invasive bees in the U.S. The project is a collaborative effort with the USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect-Biology, Management, Systematics Research Unit in Logan, UT. Required qualifications include a background in ecology, entomology, plant sciences, agriculture, or related field, experience with field research, exposure to statistics, and an ability to work in a collaborative environment. The graduate research assistantship includes an annual stipend, tuition waiver, and student health insurance. Contact Drs. Lori Spears (lori.spears@usu.edu), Ricardo Ramirez (ricardo.ramirez@usu.edu), and Terry Griswold (terry.griswold@ars.usda.gov) with your interest. Please provide a CV/resume (include GPA and GRE scores), a statement of purpose, and contact information for three references in your email. Review of applications will begin December 1, 2016. Posted: 10/27/16.

Utah State University: The Environmental Biogeochemistry and Paleoecology lab is recruiting MSc students to join an interdisciplinary research program broadly focused on aquatic ecosystems and water resources in the Canadian Columbia River Basin and the American West. The student(s) will work on one of several potential projects which seek to 1) understand the effects of climate warming and glacier recession on high mountain lakes and streams, or 2) quantify atmospheric phosphorus deposition effects in lake ecosystems. Specific research projects are flexible and students are strongly encouraged to develop their own research focus within the lab’s overall framework. Students in the lab will generally have the opportunity to gain field, laboratory, and microscopy skills. Qualifications: The student(s) must have completed a BSc by the start data and have a strong interest in water quality, limnology, biogeochemistry, or paleoecology. The student must have excellent writing and quantitative skills. Laboratory and field experience is preferred. Preference will be given to students with a strong work ethic and capacity to work independently. To Apply: Please send 1) letter describing your background, interest in the project, and educational and career goals, 2) a CV, and 3) the names and contact information for three references to Janice.brahney@usu.edu Anticipated start date is no later than August 2017, but students may begin as early as March 2017. Posted: 10/13/16.

Utah State University: The Ramirez Lab in the Department of Biology seeks a highly qualified and motivated individual wishing to pursue a graduate degree (M.Sc.) in the areas of applied entomology, insect pathology, and host plant resistance beginning summer (preferably) or fall 2017. The successful applicant will investigate clover root curculio phenology in the West and evaluate ecological interactions with host plant resistance and insect pathogens involved in the suppression of this soil herbivore. The project is a collaborative effort with the University of California-Davis and University of Idaho. Required qualifications include a background in entomology, ecology, plant sciences, agriculture, or related field, experience with field research, exposure to statistics, and an ability to work in a collaborative environment. The graduate assistantship includes an annual stipend and tuition waiver. Want to know more? Contact Dr. Ricardo Ramirez (ricardo.ramirez@usu.edu). Want to apply? Please provide a CV/resume (include GPA and GRE scores), a statement of purpose, and contact information for three references in your email. Review of applications will begin December 1, 2016. Posted: 10/11/16.

Utah State University: Graduate positions are available beginning Fall of 2017 in the research group of Dr. Noelle G. Beckman in the Department of Biology and Ecology Center. The Beckman Lab investigates interactions between plants and their environment occurring over multiple scales and examines the role of these interactions in limiting plant populations and maintaining biodiversity. Many of these interactions are disrupted by global change, and we examine the consequences of these disruptions for plant communities and ecosystem functions. The research group uses a combination of empirical and quantitative approaches to address our research questions. Examples of ongoing projects include: 1) synthesizing data with mathematical models to predict extinction risk of plant species to climate change, 2) understanding the importance of seed dispersal under global change, and 3) examining the influence of dispersal and plant consumers on plant spatial patterns. Before applying, interested candidates should contact Dr. Beckman (nbeckman AT sesync.org) with a letter of interest, CV, and contact information for two references. The recommended date to pre-apply is December 15 and application to the School of Graduate Studies is January 15 for full consideration of financial support. The Beckman Lab is committed to building a diverse and inclusive environment. Women, minorities, individuals with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. More for details about the position. Posted: 10/4/16.

Utah State University: The Waring lab is recruiting graduate students to work on projects related to plant-soil interactions and soil biogeochemistry. Applicants should have a strong research interest in plant-soil feedbacks, mycorrhizal ecology, and/or soil carbon cycling. Research in the Waring lab takes place in a diverse array of ecosystems, from semiarid grasslands to tropical forests, and is highly interdisciplinary, spanning plant, microbial, and ecosystem ecology. Candidates with lab or field experience in any of these areas are strongly encouraged to apply. For inquiries about the position, please contact bonnie.waring@usu.edu with a cover letter and CV. Posted: 9/26/16.

Utah State University: I'm looking for two PhD students to start in my lab in the 2017 academic year: one with experience in ecological and/or evolutionary modelling, and another with experience in plant ecology and fieldwork. These positions are fully funded, and include money to travel to conferences and working groups. More details and application instructions. The deadline for applications is the 15th of November. Posted: 9/14/16.

Virginia Commonwealth University: I am currently seeking graduate students at the MS and PhD level to join the Derek Johnson Research Group in the Fall of 2017. Students interested in ecological drivers of population dynamics and invasion in a changing world, particularly with a focus on insects, are encouraged to apply. The Johnson Lab asks research questions from local to landscape to geographic scales, and at temporal scales up to several centuries. We take a multi-tool approach to addressing ecological questions, including field research, analyzing existing large datasets, and population modeling. Applicants with strong quantitative skills and experience using R are preferred. The Master's program in Biology provides 2-years of competitive TA support. Applications for Fall 2017 admission to the MS program are due on January 15, 2017. The VCU Integrative Life Sciences PhD program provides up to 5 years of support in the form of research assistantships and teaching assistantships with full tuition covered. Stipend amounts are competitive on a national level. Additional support is available in the form of summer funds for PhD students in years 3 and up, travel funds to present at a national/international conference/workshop, and Dissertation Writing Fellowships for a full academic year where deserving students are paid to write and defend their dissertations. Applications for Fall 2017 admission to the PhD program are due on January 10, 2017. Candidates interested in applying for either MS or PhD positions are encouraged to email Dr. Johnson (dmjohnson@vcu.edu) well before the application deadline with the following information: 1) an unofficial transcript (undergraduate and/or MS, as appropriate), 2) curriculum vitae, and 3) a brief personal statement describing research and career goals, and how this degree would help the student achieve these goals. Posted: 10/12/16.

Virginia Commonwealth University: The Coastal Plant Ecology Lab run by Dr. Zinnert and Dr. Young has MS openings for highly motivated students interested in coastal research for the fall 2017 semester.Students with interest in combining field studies and remote sensing is preferred. Our research focuses on relationships between plants and the environment on barrier islands at multiple scales. Two projects that we are currently working on include 1) biotic and abiotic effects in barrier island state change from grassland to shrubland, and 2) understanding relationships between dune topography, swale vegetation, and effects on overall barrier island function and resilience to sea-level rise. We conduct our research at the Virginia Coast Reserve Long-Term Ecological Research site. We approach research questions at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The Coastal Plant Ecology Lab is located in the Department of Biology at VCU in Richmond, VA. VCU is the largest public university in Virginia. We are located in Richmond, VA on the James River, within easy reach of the Virginia coastal plain, Blue Ridge Mountains, Chesapeake Bay, and Virginia barrier islands. Apply to the VCU M.S. Program in Biology by January 15, 2017. Those who are interested or require more information should contact jczinnert@vcu.edu to discuss the position before applying. Posted: 9/26/16.

Virginia Commonwealth University: M.S. Graduate positions in insect behavior and multi-trophic interactions involving insect parasitoids will be available in Dr. Karen Kester’s lab in the Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, beginning August 2017. I seek students who are passionate about insects and possess a strong work ethic. Preference will be given to students with prior research experience and solid writing and quantitative skills. Current research includes mechanisms of speciation in braconid wasps, insect-plant interactions, and the thermal biology of tritrophic interactions. Interested persons are encouraged to submit by email (kmkester@vcu.edu): 1) a letter describing their educational background and research experience, research interests, and educational and career goals, 2) a CV/resume (with GPA, GRE and TOFEL (if applicable) scores, and 3) the names of three references by December 31, 2016. Applications to the VCU M.S. Graduate Program are due by January 15, 2017. Competitive teaching assistantships with tuition waivers and other forms of support are available. Posted: 9/23/16.

Virginia Commonwealth University: Graduate student opportunities are available in Dr. Salvatore Agosta’s lab in the Center for Environmental Studies and Department of Biology. We seek students that are highly motivated and enthusiastic to develop research projects in the broad areas of physiological ecology or species interactions. Current research in the lab focuses primarily on insects, including studies of thermal biology and interactions with plants. In general, the lab strives to conduct question-driven research that integrates ecological, physiological, and evolutionary perspectives to understand the interactions between organisms and their environments. Preference will be given to applicants with strong quantitative and writing skills and a clear passion for scientific research. Candidates will apply to either the Biology or Environmental Studies MS programs, or the VCU Integrative Life Sciences Ph.D. program. Interested candidates are encouraged to email 1) an unofficial transcript (undergraduate and/or MS), 2) a curriculum vitae, and 3) a brief personal statement describing research and career goals to Dr. Salvatore Agosta (sagosta@vcu.edu). The application deadlines are January 15, 2017 (MS programs), and January 10, 2017 (Ph.D.). Posted: 9/13/16.

Virginia Tech: Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship – Plant-stress interactions. We seek a highly motivated student to work on a collaborative project on the epigenetic mechanisms of stress tolerance in weeds and model systems. Projects will examine the role of epigenetics in plant response to a variety of stresses, including trans-generational inheritance of epigenetic changes. The student will lead greenhouse and growth chamber studies using a variety of stresses and plant species. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Jacob Barney and Dr. Shawn Askew and work closely with Drs. Jim Westwood, David Haak, and Liqing Zhang. The successful candidate will be fully funded (tuition and stipend) for up to 48 months (Ph.D.) on a graduate research assistantship. Qualifications: Applicants should have a strong interest and a prior degree in biology, ecology, or related discipline, an MS in a related field is desired but not required. Applicants should have extensive past research experience, an outstanding academic record and GRE scores, and evidence of strong writing and quantitative skills. Start date for the assistantship is negotiable, ranging from May to August 2017. To apply, please email a single PDF file to Dr. Jacob Barney (jnbarney@vt.edu) containing (1) a cover letter outlining your research interests, career goals, relevant experience, and preferred start date; (2) your CV; (3) undergraduate/graduate transcripts and GRE scores; and (4) full contact information for at least 3 professional references. The subject line of the email should read: Plant Stress Interactions Graduate Position. Posted: 2/15/17.

Virginia Tech: Seeking qualified applicants for a graduate assistantship at the Ph.D. level in the lab of Bryan L. Brown in the Department of Biological Sciences. Preferred starting date is Summer 2017, but Fall 2017 or even Spring 2018 could be negotiable. In general, the Brown lab focuses on community ecology in aquatic systems. Operationally, the lab emphasizes the intersection between theory and empiricism, primarily by testing broad ecological concepts using observation, experiment and, to a lesser degree, modeling. Themes in the lab include metacommunity ecology, community assembly, and the ecology of symbiosis. The Brown lab is also a member of the longstanding Virginia Tech Stream Team, a group of 8 labs in Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech that share common themes in community and ecosystem ecology, and a focus on aquatic systems. Specifically, the graduate assistantship will be supported by a recently-funded NSF project on metacommunity stability in river networks. The new project builds on prior work from the Brown lab, primarily in collaboration with Chris Swan (UMBC), and brings in the skills and experience of new collaborators Kurt Anderson (UC-Riverside) and Eric Sokol (Unv. Colorado). The project will have several diverse empirical facets that include field observational studies, field experimentation and meta-analysis using existing datasets. We will also employ a novel modeling component that will combine network modeling with metacommunity simulation modeling to generate testable hypotheses regarding the effects of network structure on stability in metacommunities. The successful student will be expected to not only engage in research included in the funded project (especially the field component for which the Brown lab is specifically responsible), but also to develop their own research focus under the general thematic umbrella of the project. This focus can include or combine any number of the project’s elements: fieldwork, experimentation, modeling, meta-analysis. Ultimately applicants will need to apply to the graduate program in the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia Tech. However, I STRONGLY urge you to contact me directly via email (stonefly@vt.edu), indicating your intention to apply. In that first message please include the following: 1) an brief introduction; 2) an academic CV; 3) GRE scores if they are currently available; 4) a description of your career goals and how you feel working on this project will further those ambitions. 1 and 4 can be included together in an email if you wish. I will give strong preference to students who have either completed a Masters degree, or who have very significant prior research experience that has resulted in publication. My goal is to bring the leading candidate to visit campus during our annual Research Day and Recruiting weekend February 4th, so if you are seriously interested, I would urge expediency. If you have questions, feel free to contact me directly at stonefly@vt.edu. Posted: 1/3/17.

Virginia Tech: The Invasive Plant Ecology Lab seeks to fill a Ph.D. position focused on broad aspects of invasive plant ecology. The student’s research will utilize the weedy invader Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)—one of the world’s worst weeds and invader of natural areas—but the scope of possible projects is broad and open to the interests of the student. The research will build on a growing body of work from our interdisciplinary team of scientists from several universities. The successful candidate will be fully funded (tuition and stipend) for up to 48 months (Ph.D.) on a graduate research assistantship. Field and laboratory research expenses are covered for the next 4 years through external federal grants and support from the University. Qualifications: Applicants should have a strong interest and a prior degree in biology, ecology, modeling or related discipline, an MS in a related field is desired but not required. Applicants should have extensive past research experience, an outstanding academic record and GRE scores, and evidence of strong writing and quantitative skills. Ph.D. applicants will also be encouraged to apply to be a Fellow in the Interfaces of Global Change Interdisciplinary Graduate Program, which provides additional training on the role of science in society, science-policy, and science communication. Start date for the assistantship is negotiable, ranging from May to August 10th, 2017. To apply, please email a single PDF file to Dr. Jacob Barney (jnbarney@vt.edu) containing (1) a cover letter outlining your research interests, career goals, relevant experience, and preferred start date; (2) your CV; (3) undergraduate/graduate transcripts and GRE scores; and (4) full contact information for at least 3 professional references. The subject line of the email should read: Invasive Plant Ecology Graduate Position. Posted: 11/6/16.

Virginia Tech: The Barrett Lab is seeking applicants for graduate research in soil ecology and biogeochemistry starting in the fall semester of 2017. Successful applicants will develop research pertinent to Long Term Ecological Research in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica and at the Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina working on projects addressing: • the responses of soil communities and biogeochemical processes to climate variability • the influence of land-use history and vegetation change on nitrogen cycling in Appalachian watersheds. • controls over primary production in microbial mat communities in polar deserts. Individuals with previous research experience and the demonstrated ability to work independently in remote field locations are strongly desired. Successful applicants will have the opportunity to participate in multidisciplinary programs in the Dept. of Biological Sciences and the Global Change Center at Virginia Tech. Please contact Dr. Jeb Barrett (jebarre@vt.edu) for further information. Posted: 10/11/16.

Virginia Tech: M.S. and Ph.D. Assistantships in Stream Ecology & Biogeochemistry, Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA. Starting Date: January or August 2017. Students will join and expand research in the Hotchkiss Lab exploring how land-water interactions, hydrology, and aquatic ecosystem processes (carbon metabolism, nutrient cycling, food web dynamics) shape the transport, transformations, and fates of carbon and nutrients in streams, rivers, and fluvial networks. Successful applicants will have: a keen interest in stream/river ecology, ecosystem ecology, and/or biogeochemistry; previous research and scientific writing experience; and the ability to work well independently and in groups. Candidates with strong quantitative skills are especially encouraged to apply. Students will be supported by research/teaching assistantships that include summer stipends and tuition. For More information about these opportunities, including due dates, and how to apply. Posted: 8/23/16.

Washington State University: The labs of Dr. Betsy Beers and Dr. Dave Crowder in the Department of Entomology are recruiting a student at the M.S. or Ph.D. level, to study acoustic (vibrational) communication by psyllid pests. Research on psyllids has shown that male and female psyllids conduct acoustic “duets” during their mate-locating activities. We are seeking a student who is interested in conducting research on acoustic communication by a psyllid pest of pears. Research areas may include behavioral analyses of duetting activities; recording acoustic signals and analyzing waveform traits; and, describing morphological structures of psyllids used in producing acoustic signals. Project aims are to develop fundamental knowledge leading to better understanding of the mate-locating activities of this pear pest. Moreover, These data will be used to design mating disruption strategies using acoustic signals that interfere with mate location by psyllids Potential students should have interests in insect behavior and mate-location strategies of insects. The research will be conducted in close collaboration with Dr. David Horton of the USDA, and field research will be conducted primarily in central Washington (so the student must be willing to travel to field sites in university-provided vehicles). Students interested in starting graduate school in August 2017 or January 2018 are encouraged to apply. To apply send CV and statement of interest to Dave Crowder (dcrowder@wsu.edu). Students that have completed MS degrees or conducted an independent research project are particularly encouraged to apply. Posted: 5/12/17.

Washington State University Vancouver: Ph.D. Assistantship in Watershed Biogeochemistry and the Food-Energy-Water Nexus. We are seeking a motivated student to pursue a Ph.D. (although exceptional M.S. applicants will also be considered), as part of an NSF-funded project investigating Innovations at the Food-Energy-Water nexus in the Columbia River Basin. The successful applicant will be expected to take on a research project focused on watershed biogeochemistry within the context of a larger, collaborative, multi-year, multi-investigator project focused on the relationship between water, food, and energy storage capacity and resilience. The student will be based at WSU Vancouver as a member of Dr. John Harrison’s Watershed Biogeochemistry and Global Change Laboratory, but there will be ample opportunities to interact with other project scientists as well. Preference will be given to candidates with a background in biogeochemistry, ecosystem ecology, hydrological or nutrient transport modeling, chemistry, environmental science, or limnology. Ideally, we are looking for a student to start in August 2017. If interested, please contact Dr. John Harrison (john_harrison@wsu.edu). Admission requirements and application materials for the Ph.D. in Environmental Science at WSU Vancouver. If preferred, a Ph.D. degree in Geology is also an option. Students will be supported by teaching and research assistantships and tuition waivers. Posted: 5/1/17.

Washington State University: Graduate Research Assistantship in Sustainability Modeling at the Food-Energy-Water Nexus. We are seeking a PhD student interested in environmental sustainability and coupled human-natural systems modeling to pursue their graduate education in the School of the Environment at Washington State University. The successful candidate will join a large, interdisciplinary team on a recently funded project researching the Food-Energy-Water (FEW) nexus of the Columbia River Basin (CRB). The student will conduct research on conceptual modelling of transactions, trade-offs and possible conflict across FEW sector boundaries, supplement the research of sector-specific team members, and help develop generic models of FEW system sustainability that are portable beyond the CRB. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the project and the subject matter, the successful candidate must be (1) highly motivated, (2) able to work within and across several disciplinary boundaries, and (3) be able to work rigorously with theoretical or abstract concepts that cut across multiple disciplines. Additionally, the candidate should have (4) a background in mathematical or formal modeling and (5) skills in collaborative research and communications. Strong consideration will be given to those who also have demonstrated background or experience in environmental or agricultural sustainability, resource policy and/or management, and quantitative analysis of complex system dynamics. A Masters degree in applied mathematics, philosophy of science/formal epistemology, or related fields is preferred, but accomplished and exceptionally motivated individuals in relevant fields will also receive full consideration. Interested candidates should send a cover letter, official or unofficial transcripts, CV, and contact information for 2 references to both Dr. Steve Katz (Steve.Katz@wsu.edu) and Dr. Michael Goldsby (michael.goldsby@wsu.edu). Information on Graduate Studies in the School of the Environment. Posted: 10/13/16.

Washington State University, Vancouver: The Porter lab is recruiting a graduate student for fall 2017. Our lab explores the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of plants and their microbial symbionts to test fundamental theory about cooperative interactions. We focus on environmentally acquired symbioses between plants and microbial mutualists such as nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria. Our research projects range from the field, to the lab to the greenhouse and integrate approaches from quantitative genetics, ecological genetics and genomics. Graduate students will have the opportunity to participate in a collaborative multi-year NSF-funded project with the Friesen lab at Michigan State University to investigate evolutionary and ecological shifts in plant-symbiont mutualism during plant invasions. Students are also welcome to develop a research program aligned with their own interests in plant or microbial evolutionary ecology. The lab supports diverse projects ranging from the importance of microbes to plant adaptation, to quantifying natural selection on cooperation. Graduate students will be supported through a combination of research assistantship in the Porter lab and TAship (5 years for PhD, 2 for MS) with the opportunity for summer funding. WSUV is a vibrant, rapidly growing institution located in the greater Portland/Vancouver metropolitan area, near the Columbia River, Cascade Mountains and coastal ocean, and as such offers an exceptional quality of life. Interested students should send a copy of their CV, description of research interests, and unofficial copy of transcripts to stephanie.porter@wsu.edu. Posted: 11/8/16.

Wesleyan University: The Singer Lab in the Biology Department is recruiting a Ph.D. student to participate in a collaborative project looking at effects of forest fragmentation on tri-trophic interactions at a landscape scale. The collaboration involves colleagues from the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at U. Connecticut: Dr. Robert Bagchi, Dr. David Wagner, and Dr. Christopher Elphick, and their lab groups. The broader project investigates bottom-up and top-down ecological and evolutionary factors hypothesized to cause the loss of dietary specialist, tree-feeding caterpillars from communities in fragmented forests in Connecticut. The Ph.D. project will mechanistically test the hypothesis that the fitness costs incurred by dietary specialist caterpillars are more severe than those incurred by dietary generalist caterpillars on woody host plants occurring in fragmented forest stands. The project entails 3 years of research funding, with additional years guaranteed support by the Biology Department. Applicants should have a strong interest in the evolutionary ecology of insect-plant interactions. Prior research experience at the undergraduate or Master's level is desirable. Individuals from underrepresented groups in the sciences are encouraged to apply. Applications will be processed through the Biology Department, although prospective applicants are encouraged to contact Dr. Michael Singer (msinger@wesleyan.edu) in advance. Posted: 8/30/16.

West Virginia University: The Interdisciplinary Hydrology Laboratory and the Institute of Water Security and Science in collaboration with the Divisions of Plant and Soil Sciences, and Forestry and Natural Resources in the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, invite applications for a Ph.D. graduate research assistant who will conduct research investigating the relationships of hydrology, pathogens and suspended sediment. Start date will be fall semester (August 16th) 2017. Primary duties include water flow and water quality monitoring with additional responsibilities including field work, stream cross sections, instrument maintenance, data collection, processing, analyses and modeling, coursework, dissertation, and multiple publications. Applicants must possess bachelors and master’s degrees completed in natural resources, ecology, environmental sciences, physical hydrology, water quality, or a closely related field. Experience in stream measurements, data processing, analysis and modeling, water quality monitoring and analysis, GIS, and strong verbal, written, and computational skills are highly desired. Successful applicants will work collaboratively and independently, conduct field work under variable weather conditions, and aid in installation and maintenance of instruments and monitoring sites. Applicants must possess a valid US driver's license and be able to lift and carry equipment and tools. To apply, please forward by email the following documents (unofficial documents for initial application are acceptable; incomplete applications will not be reviewed): transcript, curriculum vitae, recent GRE scores, recent TOEFL/IELTS scores (international students), cover letter (including academic, research and professional goals and interests), and the names and contact information of three references to: Dr. Jason Hubbart, 3109 Agricultural Sciences Building, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Tel No. (304) 293-2472; Fax: (304) 293-2960; Email: Jason.Hubbart@mail.wvu.edu. Posted: 5/1/17.

West Virginia University: M.S. Graduate Research Assistant: The role of understory nitrogen metabolism in watershed-level nitrogen retention in an Appalachian hardwood forest. The Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, in the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, invites applications for a graduate research assistant (GRA) to conduct research on the role of the herb layer in nitrogen cycling in an Appalachian hardwood forest. The study is situated in and takes advantage of the data-rich environment of the Fernow Experimental Forest operated by the U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Station. West Virginia University is the state’s flagship research-one institution, and is among the top universities in the nation, with demonstrated excellence in teaching and research. The successful applicant will conduct field work and sample collection, processing, and analyses to: 1) assess whether particular herbaceous species are disproportionally found under tree species associated with either high N or low N availability, 2) assess the relative importance of overstory and understory plants in watershed nitrogen retention, and 3) to assess how the composition of different soil nitrogen compounds is influenced by tree species associated with high vs low N availability. Other duties include (but are not limited to) various field and lab work, maintenance of field equipment, coursework and publication. The production of an exemplary thesis is expected. Applicants must possess a bachelor’s degree completed in natural resources, ecology, biology, environmental sciences, or a closely related field. Experience in forest plant identification, data processing, analysis, and GIS are a plus. Strong verbal, written, and computational skills are mandatory. Successful applicants will work collaboratively and independently, and conduct field work under variable weather conditions in steep, mountainous terrain. Applicants must possess a valid US driver's license. The preferred start date of the position is May or June of 2017. However, this position remains open until filled. If interested in applying, please forward by email the following documents (incomplete applications will not be reviewed): transcript, curriculum vitae, recent GRE scores, recent TOEFL/IELTS scores (international students), cover letter (including academic, research and professional goals and interests), and the names and contact information of three references to: Dr. Kirsten Stephan, Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, 337D Percival Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Tel: (304) 293-0024; Email: Kirsten.Stephan@mail.wvu.edu. Posted: 3/20/17.

West Virginia University: A Ph.D. graduate student position is available in the Quantitative Forest Management lab of Dr. Steve Chhin in the Division of Forestry and Natural Resources. The general objective of the project associated with this position is the restoration of the historical structure and species composition of mixed conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada region of California. The project will involve determining the effective intensity of mechanical thinning treatments to remove shade tolerant competitors and thereby promote the productivity of old-growth trees, reduce the risk of stand replacing fires, and ensure forest resilience to climate change. Dendrochronological analyses will be conducted to reconstruct historical forest stand dynamics to provide a target for forest restoration efforts. The position will also involve modeling growth and survival of old-growth trees and young plantations within the Sierra Nevada. The Ph.D. student will primarily be responsible for coordinating, planning and conducting the field and laboratory components of the project, with assistance from field and laboratory technicians. Field work will be conducted in California while lab work and course work will be completed at WVU which is located in Morgantown, WV. Qualifications: Applicants should preferably have completed a MS degree. A completed degree in forestry, biology, ecology, environmental sciences, or a similarly related natural resource field is acceptable. Preference will be given to applicants that are highly self-motivated, possess a strong work ethic, and have strong oral and written communication skills. A background or strong interest in conducting field based research and working in a laboratory environment is desirable. Applicants must enjoy working (e.g., rigorous field work) and living outdoors (e.g., camping) and possess a valid driver’s license. A cumulative GPA greater than 3.3 in undergraduate and graduate coursework is preferred. Short-listed candidates eventually will be asked to submit a writing sample. The start date for this position is August 2017. This position includes a tuition waiver and health benefits, and a competitive stipend. Application: Please submit: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) unofficial transcripts, 4) GRE scores, 5) contact information of three references, and 6) TOEFL scores (for international applicants). Please describe your career goals in the cover letter. To ensure full consideration, please e-mail your application material to Dr. Steve Chhin (sc0061@mix.wvu.edu) by April 7, 2017. Posted: 3/20/17.

West Virginia University: The Morrissey lab is seeking a motivated Ph.D. student interested in researching microbial ecology and soil carbon cycling. Students with experience in molecular biology, stable isotope probing, bioinformatics, biogeochemistry, and/or soil ecology are particularly encouraged to apply. If you are interested in this opportunity please contact Dr. Ember Morrissey and provide a brief description of your research interests and career goals as well as a resume/CV highlighting any relevant coursework and experience. Potential students will apply to one of the graduate programs within the Davis School of Agriculture. Posted: 2/14/17.

West Virginia University: The Freedman Lab of Environmental Microbiology is now accepting applications for a PhD-level Graduate Assistant position. Our research generally focuses on how biological, chemical, and physical factors affect the composition of soil microbial communities and their ecosystem function. A wide range of research topics are possible, including but not limited to: Impacts of anthropogenic climate change on the microbiomes of Appalachian forests and watersheds; effects of mining and mine reclamation on soil microbial communities; effects of herbivory on plant-microbe interactions, among many other possible topics. Qualified applicants will be highly motivated, enthusiastic, and will have a strong background in ecology, microbiology, soil science, or a closely related field. Experience with high-throughput DNA sequencing, metagenomics, biogeochemical measurements (for example, CO2 and trace gas production, enzyme activities, soil characteristics) and programming in R is ideal. Tuition Waiver and Stipend: The assistantship includes full tuition coverage, benefits, and a yearly stipend of $22k Opportunities for Teaching Assistantships will also be available. The expected start date is August 23, 2017. To Apply: Prospective students should send the following information with the subject line “PhD Position” to zachary.freedman@mail.wvu.edu: 1) a one page cover letter describing your research experience, interests, and goals, 2) a current CV, 3) current GRE scores, 4) unofficial transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate education, and 5) contact information for three academic references. Applications received by February 15 will receive full consideration. The selected applicant will submit a formal application to the WVU Graduate School for admission to the Applied and Environmental Microbiology Graduate Program. Posted: 1/16/17.

West Virginia University: The School of Natural Resources is seeking a highly motivated graduate student at either the PhD or MS level to study multi-species dynamics of high-elevation Appalachian bird communities. The student’s thesis or dissertation will evaluate the role of interspecific interactions, climate, and environmental conditions in shaping the distribution and temporal dynamics of Appalachian breeding birds. The project will have a strong quantitative component, and the student should have an interest and aptitude in developing advanced quantitative skills. Qualifications: Degree in wildlife science, ecology, zoology, or closely related field. Candidates should have experience identifying breeding birds (preferably within the eastern US) by sound and sight. Preference will be given to candidates experienced with generalized linear mixed models, particularly within a Bayesian context, though a demonstrated interest and aptitude in developing quantitative skills will go a long way. Candidates must have a minimum 3.25 GPA. Preference will be given to candidates who scored above the 50th percentile in both the quantitative and verbal components of the GRE. Stipend: $16,536 (MS) or $19,848 (PhD), plus health insurance and university tuition waiver. To Apply: Interested individuals should send a CV, cover letter, a 500-word statement of purpose (why do you want to work on this project, your research interests, and long-term career goals), unofficial copy of transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references as a single PDF file to Dr. Christopher Rota at christopher.rota@mail.wvu.edu. Explicitly state within your cover letter whether you are applying for the MS or PhD position. Review of applications will begin the week of January 23. Posted: 8/23/16, revised: 1/10/17.

West Virginia University: A graduate student position is available for investigating how acid deposition affects the nutrient dynamics and productivity of deciduous forests in central Appalachia. The student will conduct their research at the Fernow Experimental Forest and would receive training in the use of analytical instrumentation, experimental design, data analysis, computer modeling, communication skills, and teaching. Summer support is available for four years and this would supplement support received during the academic year for being a teaching assistant in the Department of Biology. Information about the graduate program in biology, and how to apply. A successful applicant should have: (1) a bachelor's or master's degree in a relevant field of study; (2) a strong interest in ecosystem ecology and environmental change; (3) a willingness to learn techniques used to analyze the chemical composition of soil, water, and plant samples; (5) strong writing skills, and (6) a commitment to the effective communication of science to technical and non-technical audiences. A student able to begin in the Summer 2017 and who has experience, or a strong interest, in using computer models to synthesize long-term ecological data is desirable. To learn more, please contact: Dr. William Peterjohn, Department of Biology, West Virginia University, bpj@wvu.edu, 304-293-1300. Posted: 8/25/16, revised: 9/28/16, 10/28/16.

West Virginia University: Ph.D. or M.S. Graduate Research Assistantship – Black Duck Wintering Ecology in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, Wildlife and Fisheries Resources Program. STARTING DATE: August 2016. Student will be supported by Research Assistantship with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Black Duck Joint Venture (BDJV), West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, and the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The objectives of the study are to: 1) Determine non-breeding black duck use of rivers and created and natural wetlands in West Virginia and Pennsylvania; 2) Construct time-activity budgets of black ducks within each habitat type to calculate basic energy expenditure models; 3) Determine potential carrying capacity, based on seeds and invertebrates, of wetlands; 4) Relate black duck densities and behavioral activities to landscape and habitat characteristics; and 5) Develop regional bioenergetics models of the amount and type of habitat needed to meet BDJV goals. The students will be working toward a Ph.D. in Forest Resources Science (Wildlife emphasis) or M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Resources. PhD applications are preferred. Qualifications: M.S. in Wildlife, Ecology, Environmental Science, or closely related field for Ph.D. degree or similar B.S. degree for M.S. position. Minimum GPA of 3.4 and combined quantitative/verbal GRE scores of 305 (~1,200 old scoring system). A strong interest in waterfowl management is required. Previous experience with wetland and waterfowl is highly desired. STIPEND: $19k/year (Ph.D.), $16k (MS) plus health insurance and tuition waiver. Interested individuals should send a letter of interest, Curriculum Vitae, a 500-word statement of purpose (why do you want to work on waterfowl, your research and career goals, etc.), copies of transcripts and GRE scores, and contact information for 3 references as a single PDF document to Dr. Jim Anderson at jim.anderson@mail.wvu.edu. Posted: 7/18/16.

Western Washington University: Graduate student position beginning fall 2017. I have funding for a graduate student to work on a master's thesis examining the relationship between benthic community structure and sediment geochemistry in Puget Sound, Washington State. In partnership with the Washington Department of Ecology, students in my laboratory will measure rates of sedimentary organic carbon mineralization, nutrient cycling, and other biogeochemical processes and compare these measurements to biomass and community structure of benthic macrofaunal communities throughout Puget Sound. The graduate student will learn how to measure rates of dissolved oxygen, inorganic carbon and nutrient fluxes, pH, and concentration profiles of nutrients and radionuclides. Depending on the direction of the student's thesis, the work may also include biogeochemical modeling and multivariate analysis of sediment geochemistry and benthic community structure. Students interested in studying the interface between community ecology and geochemistry are encouraged to contact me, David Shull (david.shull@wwu.edu), about this position. Posted: 12/13/16.

Wilfrid Laurier University: Two MSc positions are available for enthusiastic students interested in ecology and limnology. These students will join the laboratory of Dr. Derek Gray in the Department of Biology at WLU in Waterloo, Ontario. Both students will conduct research on the response of biological communities in lakes to long-term environmental stressors. Canadian lakes are changing in response to a warming climate, invasive species, and pollution. Understanding and predicting the impact of these changes on organisms in lakes is important for the development of management and adaptation efforts in regions of Canada expected to be affected by environmental change. Students are needed for two projects: 1) Examining the response of zooplankton communities to long-term salinity changes in lakes on the Great Plains of North America. This student will use paleolimnology and resurrection ecology approaches to examine how zooplankton have coped with climate-driven salinity changes on the Great Plains over the last two centuries. This research will allow us to better understand the potential impacts of predicted salinity increases in Great Plains lakes as a result of climate change. 2) Examining the recovery of zooplankton communities in acid-damaged Canadian Shield lakes. This student will examine the challenges of reestablishment for small populations of zooplankton recolonizing lakes damaged by acidification. The student will work with population growth models and examine zooplankton behavior in an effort to better understand the barriers to recolonization when populations occur at low densities. Both students will have the opportunity to gain extensive field and laboratory experience as part of their research projects. Students will be enrolled in the MSc in Integrative Biology Program at Wilfrid Laurier and will be guaranteed a minimum stipend of $21,500 per year for two years supported by a combination of grant funding, scholarships, and teaching assistantships. Information on the MSc program. Interested students should have a background in environmental science, ecology, or another related field. Please send a letter of interest describing your background and research interests to dgray@wlu.ca. Posted: 9/14/16.

Wright State University: I am seeking a Ph.D. student to join my laboratory studying the mechanistic basis and outcomes of novel plant–insect interactions. Funding is available through a combination of graduate research and teaching assistantships, and the student may start as early as Fall semester 2017 (August 2017). While the specific focus of the dissertation research is negotiable, current research foci include causes and consequences of host range expansion of emerald ash borer and the interaction of native insects with invasive host plants. Our work typically blends an understanding of the chemical basis of interactions with ecological outcomes. Interest in these and related topics is preferred. The student will be enrolled in Wright State’s Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences Ph.D. Program. Application requirements include: Bachelors degree in Biology, Ecology, Entomology, Plant Sciences, or related field; GRE scores within the last 5 y; minimum IBT TOEFL score of 100 and ability to pass a verbal English test (foreign students only), and current driver’s license or ability to obtain one. Preferred qualifications include: Masters degree or equivalent experience; a strong background in plant sciences/ecology/entomology, with interest and/or experience in field and laboratory research; good communication and writing skills. The current stipend is approx. $23k on a 12 month basis. See the Environmental Sciences Ph.D. program for program requirements, application procedures and stipends. Please contact Don Cipollini (don.cipollini@wright.edu) for more information about projects in the lab and the program prior to submitting an application. Posted: 5/31/17.

York University: A funded position(s) with Dr. Christopher Lortie is available to do research either at the MSC or PhD level on positive interactions using shrubs, annual plants, and animals. See our lab website http://www.ecoblender.org and the personal blog of Lortie. The primary focus of the research is exploring how we might better use positive interactions between plants for restoration and management of arid systems. In particular, we want to examine influences on other taxa such as insects (including pollinators), endangered animal species (such as leopard lizards and kangaroo rats - cute), and on community biodiversity dynamics. The research is in California, and we have partners with the BLM and Nature Conservancy. Each Fall, we plan experiments, analyze data, and write papers. In these deserts, it is a winter growing season with some rains. Hence, January to May are spent in California. Summers usually spent in Toronto for teaching assistant positions provided by university. Please contact lortie@yorku.ca for more information. Start date as early as Sept 8, 2016 if you apply rapidly and have a GPA of B+ (with experience) or an A. Canadian and International Students eligible, but Canadian Citizens pay significantly less tuition. Posted: 6/23/16.

Assistantships and Fellowships | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses

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Assistantships and Fellowships | Fellowship Program Links | Short Courses

Short Courses:

Fourth Annual Graduate Workshop on Environmental Data Analytics - June 12-16, 2017, NCAR, Boulder CO. This workshop series is designed to help prepare the next generation of researchers and practitioners to work within, and contribute to, the data-rich era. Each workshop will bring together graduate students and senior scientists in environmental statistics and related fields to explore contemporary topics in applied environmental data modeling. The workshop will consist of hands-on computing and modeling tutorials, presentations from graduate student participants, and invited talks from early career and established leaders in environmental data modeling. Tutorials and invited talks will address useful ideas and tools directly applicable to student participants' current and future research. Workshop participants will: *Develop new modeling and computing skills through hands-on analyses and lectures led by quantitative scientists *Share research findings and explore open questions within and at the interface of environmental, ecological, climatic, and statistical sciences *Learn about the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) data resources that can facilitate scientific discovery. Twenty five graduate students in environmental, ecological, climatic, and statistical science fields will be selected to participate in this year's week-long workshop. There is no registration fee. Lodging will be at CU-Boulder and daily transportation to NCAR Mesa Lab and NEON is covered by the sponsors (NSF, NCAR, IMAGe, and SAMSI). Participants will only be responsible for travel to Boulder and meals. Application materials are due March 31 and notification will occur around April 4. Please see www2.cisl.ucar.edu/events/workshops/4th-annual-graduate-workshop-environmental-data-analytics-2017 for application details. Please email Andrew Finley finleya@msu.edu with any questions. Posted: 3/20/17.

Organization for Tropical Studies Graduate Field Courses: I wanted to let you know about the courses we will be offering this academic year. Graduate Courses 2016-2017: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond (4 weeks, 29 Dec 2016 – 24 Jan 2017) Deadline: October 10, 2017 Website link: http://bitly.com/FieldEcology Tropical Biology: An Ecological Approach (6 weeks, 22 May – 2 July 2017) Deadline: February 3, 2017 Website link: http://bit.ly/TropBio The above two courses are our hallmark field ecology courses that immerse graduate students in hypothesis-driven research learning. The 4-weekField Ecology in late December and January allows students to fit in the course while still attending fall and spring terms at their home campus. The 6-weekTropical Biology, scheduled this year during Summer Session 1, will provide more time during and after the course to hone research skills. Both courses include a science communication workshop to share research through the production of podcasts and videos. Please take a moment to view a video about these courses (click here). Graduate Short Courses 2017: Ecology and Evolution of Arachnids (2 weeks, 3 – 17 January 2017) Deadline: October 10, 2017 Website link: bit.ly/arachid Tropical Ferns and Lycophytes (2 weeks, 6 – 22 January 2017) Deadline: October 10, 2017 Website link: bit.ly/2c5dzyk Biology of Neotropical Social Insects (2 weeks, 12 – 24 March 2017) Deadline: November 15, 2017 Website link: http://bit.ly/soc_ins Tropícal Butterfly Ecology (2 weeks, 28 May – 10 June 2017) Deadline: March 1, 2017 Website link: bit.ly/Tbe2016 Ecology and Evolution of Coleoptera (Beetles) (3 weeks, 5 – 24 June 2017) Deadline: March 1, 2017 Website link: bit.ly/eec2017. Posted: 9/21/16.

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